wiki:WIMAXExperiments

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  1. Catalog of WiMAX Experiments, Demos and Tutorials
    1. 1. References
      1. 1.1 How to Run Experiments on GENI WiMAX Testbeds
      2. 1.2 OMF/OML in WiMAX Sites and Experiments
      3. 1.3 Writing and Conducting WiMAX Experiments Using OMF/OML at GEC11
      4. 1.4 Using OMF and OML in Your Experiment at GEC12
      5. 1.5) Types of WiMAX Experiments in GENI
    2. 2. Experiments and Demos
      1. 2.1 WiMAX Base Station Demo at GEC6
      2. 2.2 Demo Planning at GEC7
      3. 2.3 Demo Planning for GEC8 and GEC9
      4. 2.4 ParkNet Demo at GEC9
      5. 2.5 "Wirel" Demo at GEC9
      6. 2.6 Measurements and Experiments at GEC10
      7. 2.7 Throughput and Range Measurements at GEC10
        1. Columbia University (1770)
        2. Polytechnic Institute of NYU (1751)
        3. UCLA (1797)
        4. Colorado: (1768)
        5. UMass Amherst (1731)
        6. Wisconsin (1724)
        7. BBN Technologies, Cambridge MA
      8. 2.8 Local Experiments at GEC10
      9. 2.9 Measurements and Experiments at GEC11
      10. 2.10 Throughput and Range Measurements at GEC11
        1. Columbia University (1770)
        2. Polytechnic Institute of NYU (1751)
        3. UCLA (1797)
        4. Colorado: (1768)
        5. UMass Amherst (1731)
        6. Wisconsin (1724)
        7. BBN Technologies, Cambridge MA
      11. 2.11 BBN Reference Throughput and Range Experiment at GEC11
      12. 2.12 MIT Experiments at GEC12
      13. 2.13 Experiments at GEC12
        1. Throughput Experiment Using iperf
        2. Throughput Experiment Using Bit Torrent
        3. Raw IP and UDP Traffic Generators
        4. Using OMF and OML in Your Experiment
        5. Multiple Site Experiment: Mobility First
      14. 2.14 Multiple Site Experiment: Mobility First
      15. 2.15 Demos at GEC13
        1. Cooperative Packet Recovery over Heterogeneous Networks
        2. Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Algorithms on Operational Network
        3. Demonstration of Robust Delivery Services and Multi-homing in …
      16. 2.16 Demos at GEC14
        1. Multi-Site Experimentation with GENI WiMAX
        2. Running Opportunistic Mobile Wireless Network Experiments on ORBIT
        3. Demonstration of a WiMAX-Optical hybrid network with dynamic switching
        4. Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on GENI
        5. Clemson WiMAX BW Contention Resolution and DDoS demo
        6. Global Name Resolution Service: Scalable Mobility Support in …
        7. WiRover/WiMAX demo
      17. 2.17 Review of Types of WiMAX Experiments at GEC14
      18. 2.18 WiMAX Spectrum Survey Tool
      19. 2.19 Wireless Demos at GEC15
        1. Supporting MobilityFirst in OpenFlow based SDNs
        2. OFUWI: Network Coding
        3. SENSORKITS
        4. WiMAX at NYU-Poly
        5. WiRover
      20. 2.20 Wireless Demos at GEC16
        1. Vertical Handoff Using OpenFlow
        2. Network Coding on ProtoGENI for Vehicular Networks
        3. Supporting MobilityFirst in OpenFlow Based SDNs
        4. WiMAX Prototyping in Metro Detroit
        5. Mobility Services Engine
        6. MobilityFirst Network API use in Mobile Applications
        7. WiMAX at NYU-Poly
        8. WiMAX DDoS Reverse Engineering
        9. Freedom of Internet
      21. 2.21 Wireless Papers at Second GENI Research and Educational …
        1. GENI WiMAX Performance Evaluation and Comparison of Two Campus Testbeds
        2. WiMAX in the Classroom Designing a Cellular Networking Hands-on Lab
        3. Malware Detection for Mobile Devices Using Software Defined Networking
        4. Network Coding for Efficient Broadband Data Delivery in …
        5. Cloud-based Handoff as a Service for Heterogeneous Vehicular Networks …
    3. 3. Tutorials
      1. 3.1 OML Tutorial at GEC9
      2. 3.2 OMF/OML Tutorial at GEC10
      3. 3.3 GENI WiMAX Tutorial at GEC13
      4. 3.4 GENI WiMAX Tutorial at TridentCom 2012 on June 11, 2012
      5. 3.5 OMF Tutorial at GEC14
      6. 3.6 GENI WiMAX Tutorial at GEC14
      7. 3.7 GENI WiMAX Tutorial at GEC15
      8. 3.8 GENI WiMAX Tutorial at GEC16

Catalog of WiMAX Experiments, Demos and Tutorials

1. References

1.1 How to Run Experiments on GENI WiMAX Testbeds

overview and instructions

1.2 OMF/OML in WiMAX Sites and Experiments

use cases

1.3 Writing and Conducting WiMAX Experiments Using OMF/OML at GEC11

guide to document

reference WiMAX throughput experiment

conducting an experiment

1.4 Using OMF and OML in Your Experiment at GEC12

Christoph Dwertmann (NICTA)

slides

Basic throughput experiment using OMF/OML

OML'ified apps we know of include:

gpslogger
Iperf
omf_nmetrics
omf_trace
otg and otr
wlanconfig_oml
Yantt (Yet another network testing tool)
SNMP wrapper

Repository for OML'ified apps

List of available modules with OMF and OML for use in your experiment
Approach for adding OMF and OML interfaces to additional modules

1.5) Types of WiMAX Experiments in GENI

Paper including sections on basic and extended WiMAX sites, and on WiMAX research and service experiments: pdf

2. Experiments and Demos

2.1 WiMAX Base Station Demo at GEC6

See slides

This demo included:

WiMAX coverage from Rutgers, WINLAB to an outdoor mobile client, driving in a loop.
Throughput to an indoor mobile client, demonstrating imporved throughput due to traffic shaping.

2.2 Demo Planning at GEC7

See notes

At the GEC7 meeting on 3/16, Dipankar (Ray) Raychaudhuri led the campus projects in a discussion of research use cases and planned experiments; see

2.3 Demo Planning for GEC8 and GEC9

See notes

2.4 ParkNet Demo at GEC9

See slides

2.5 "Wirel" Demo at GEC9

This demo combines both WiMAX and OpenFlow elements.

2.6 Measurements and Experiments at GEC10

See summary

2.7 Throughput and Range Measurements at GEC10

see

Columbia University (1770)

PI: Henning Schulzrinne, Sung-Hoon Seo and Jan Janak:
NA

Polytechnic Institute of NYU (1751)

PI: Thanasis Korakis
slides
Throughput from 0.5 to 12Mbps; asymmetry on the uplink and downlink; many variations in urban area.

UCLA (1797)

PI: Mario Gerla, Giovanni Pau
slides
Seeing 14Mb/s DL, 2 - 3 Mb/s UL; connect to vehicle up to 300 m; client always receives, but cannot always connect; helped by setting client IP address; windows client works better than Linux client.
Poster from demo session: [ poster]

Colorado: (1768)

PI: Dirk Grunwald Univ. of Colorado, Boulder
Studying U Colorado private network, built by Airspan.
Starting data modeling using Anritsu MS2721B with WiMAX demodulator; acquiring propagation based model from Airspan deployment.
Reference: Airspan plan for U Colorado slides.
Reference: MS thesis on "Field Study of WiMAX Performance"
text.

UMass Amherst (1731)

PI: Mark Corner, Brian Lynn
NA Issue: Would like coverage to downtown Amherst, 1 mi away; can this be done?
Issue: Can antenna be moved outside of bus for better range? Check with how UW Madison puts antennas on buses.

Wisconsin (1724)

PI: Suman Banerjee and Derek Meyer:
Using dongle with Windows 7 PC; seen RSSI from -40 dbm down to -60 dbm; have seen connectivity up to 300 yds.
Existing Cisco system: Connectivity to buses, equipped with large client antenna, up to 500M, for coverage over 1.25 sq mi.
Poster from demo session: [ poster]

BBN Technologies, Cambridge MA

Manu Gosain and Harry Mussman:
slides
Range and throughput experiment uses script in mobile station and server behind base station to evaluate connection with ping and iperf. Seeing good throughput (up to 14Mb/s DL and 1 - 2 Mb/s UL) to 0.25 mi, but not yet further. Soon, will vary BTS and iperf parameters to see if can find a set for greater distances at lower rates. Do not expect range beyond 0.6mi.

2.8 Local Experiments at GEC10

MIT experiments, using BBN BTS, started: evaluate ARQ and HARQ changes to better support video streaming

Clemson experiments, using BBN and/or Rutgers BTS, started: evaluate DOS attack susceptibility

Two experiments being planned at NYU Poly: See slides

2.9 Measurements and Experiments at GEC11

See summary

2.10 Throughput and Range Measurements at GEC11

see

Columbia University (1770)

Marcus Knuepfer
slides
Status:
Situated 16 floors up, to cover the campus
Completed signal strength measurements for downlink and uplink, at 125 locations; used www.gpsvisualizer.com to create coverage map, good coverage of campus.
Future work:
Teaching module
Add NetServ programmable router (see Jae Woo Lee)

Polytechnic Institute of NYU (1751)

PI: Thanasis Korakis
slides
Status:
Using bit torrent in python scriptto collect location, uplink and downlink; do not need to initiate iperf again and again
Presented througput results; max distance 0.5 miles for connectivity; max downlink 17mbps udp; max uplink 1 mbps udp; continuous operation,no failure; when it connects it works

UCLA (1797)

Giovanni Pau
slides
Status:
Wimax bs up ~ 6 months
Throughput measurements; old version Intel 5150: starts well but gets too hot and then does not connect; will try out Intel 6250; window dongle does not work with linux
In progress: integration of OMF/OML
Piece of software in LUA
HTC unlocked EVO phones ~800$, but only for LTE release 8,9

Colorado: (1768)

PI: Dirk Grunwald Univ. of Colorado, Boulder
slides
Status:
Antenna 9 stories high.
Bicycle setup for measuring signal strength with Anritsu analyzer
Using kriging interpolated coverage map, to evaluate propagation models, by wimax-phd student
Have REN Com network planning tool experimental license: testing out this software

UMass Amherst (1731)

Brian Lynn
slides
Status:
17 story building, using omni 8dbi antenna
Connecting to Internet; not yet VLAN or I2
Mobile clients on 2 (soon 3) UMass transit buses; "bricks" with Intel 6250
Experiments can be automatically deployed; fll access to wimax driver functionality
Get 5-7 Mbs/ DL to 0.25mi
UL iperf unreliable

Wisconsin (1724)

PI: Suman Banerjee and Derek Meyer:
slides
Status:
DL RSSI good; download file from speedtest.net for throughput; see 0.5 to 1.5 Mb/s; coverage map at: link
Using python script
Next steps:
Kemp campus station rural area needs connectivity;
map; use 2nd GENI BS?; maybe move their BS to the wild

BBN Technologies, Cambridge MA

Hamed Soroush:
slides
Status:
Have completed Case 3 use case experiment, using OMF/OML in Dell netbook
Explain OMF script
TCP and UDP throughput measurements completed with iperf dual

2.11 BBN Reference Throughput and Range Experiment at GEC11

guide to document

reference WiMAX throughput experiment

conducting an experiment

results slides

2.12 MIT Experiments at GEC12

MIT experiments, using BBN and UCLA sites: evaluate ARQ and HARQ changes to better support video streaming
Danail Traskov (MIT)
slides
Experiment 1: How control loops for arq and harq interact; can we optimize the sub paramters withing arq and harq
Experiment 2: heterogeneous networking with WiFi, WiMAX and Iridium

2.13 Experiments at GEC12

see

Throughput Experiment Using iperf

Manu Gosain (GPO) and Harry Mussman (GPO)

Overview of basic throughput experiment, using bidirectional iperf, both TCP and UDP

Basic throughput experiment using OMF/OML

The basic throughput experiments we have done utilize iperf, both TCP and UDP.

In iperf, the data is generated in the client, and flows to the server.
We put the client in the Mobile Station, and the server in the Base Station.
We used -d dualtest (bidirectional mode), where test is initiated at the client, data begins to flow to the server, and then a second data flow starts at the server; at the end of the test, results are available at the client.
Because of this, all tests can be initiated at the Mobile Station, and then results are available there.

iperf results in the TCP mode depend upon buffer sizes; overall delay; and lost packets.

Because of wireless propagation conditions, lost packets are common, and slight changes can significantly affect the measured throughput.
Thus, TCP results are highly variable; we took multiple measurements at each point, and identified the best and worst results.
It would certainly be good to have a better way to evaluate available channel bandwidth.
On the other hand, most apps use TCP and the variable results are typical of how these apps would see the channel.

iperf results in the UDP mode, counts % packets received, for a given (fixed) transmit rate.

If the rate is set below the available bandwidth, typically 100% of the packets are received.
If the rate is set above the available bandwidth, typically % of the packets are received typically equals available bandwidth divided by offered bandwidth, but there is no way to understand how many packets are actually lost.
An extended test that ramped up the offered bandwidth in multiple tests, could actually verify the available bandwidth; this could then be repeated to see real variations in available bandwidth.

References:

iperf tutorial slides
iperf tutorial web site

Throughput Experiment Using Bit Torrent

Fraida Fund (NYU Poly)

slides

Overview of throughput experiment, using bit torrent.
Advantages

Reference
More information & source code
Use the NYU-Poly WiMAX testbed

Raw IP and UDP Traffic Generators

Surat (Au) Teerapittayanon (MIT)

Overview of new raw IP and UDP traffic generators, to accurately gauge available channel bandwidth.
slides

Using OMF and OML in Your Experiment

Christoph Dwertmann (NICTA)

slides

Basic throughput experiment using OMF/OML

OML'ified apps we know of include:

gpslogger
Iperf
omf_nmetrics
omf_trace
otg and otr
wlanconfig_oml
Yantt (Yet another network testing tool)
SNMP wrapper

Repository for OML'ified apps

List of available modules with OMF and OML for use in your experiment
Approach for adding OMF and OML interfaces to additional modules

Multiple Site Experiment: Mobility First

Kiran Nagaraja (WINLAB)

slides

Overview of current Mobility First multiple-site experiment.

What additions are needed?
1) Add WiFi AP to each site.
2) L2 path from MS to core

Experiment done without human intervention, by using x2 MAC addresses, and emulating packet loss to fake mobility.
Consider these as possible sites by GEC13: WINLAB; BBN; NYU Poly; UCLA; Colorado.

2.14 Multiple Site Experiment: Mobility First

Kiran Nagaraja (WINLAB)

slides

Overview of current Mobility First multiple-site experiment.

What additions are needed?
1) Add WiFi AP to each site.
2) L2 path from MS to core

Experiment done without human intervention, by using x2 MAC addresses, and emulating packet loss to fake mobility.
Consider these as possible sites by GEC13: WINLAB; BBN; NYU Poly; UCLA; Colorado.

2.15 Demos at GEC13

Cooperative Packet Recovery over Heterogeneous Networks

NYU Poly
link

Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Algorithms on Operational Network

Clemson
link

Demonstration of Robust Delivery Services and Multi-homing in MobilityFirst FIA

Rutgers WINLAB, and UMass Lowell
link

2.16 Demos at GEC14

Multi-Site Experimentation with GENI WiMAX

Fraida Fund and Thanasis Korakis (Polytechnic Institute of NYU)
link

Running Opportunistic Mobile Wireless Network Experiments on ORBIT

Jiang Li (Howard University)
link

Demonstration of a WiMAX-Optical hybrid network with dynamic switching

Cathy Chen (Columbia University)
link

Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on GENI

Prof. Richard R Brooks, Ilker Ozcelik (Clemson University)
link

Clemson WiMAX BW Contention Resolution and DDoS demo

Prof. Richard R Brooks, Katherine Cameron kccamer@clemson.edu (Clemson University)
link

Global Name Resolution Service: Scalable Mobility Support in MobilityFirst FIA

Feixiong Zhang, Tam Vu, Akash Baid, Yanyong Zhang, Thu D. Nguyen, Kiran Nagaraja, Ivan Seskar, Dipankar Raychaudhuri (WINLAB, Rutgers University)
link

WiRover/WiMAX demo

Derek Meyer and Suman Banerjee (Wisconsin Wireless and NetworkinG Systems (WiNGS) laboratory, Cisco Systems)
link

2.17 Review of Types of WiMAX Experiments at GEC14

link

2.18 WiMAX Spectrum Survey Tool

see

2.19 Wireless Demos at GEC15

Supporting MobilityFirst in OpenFlow based SDNs

The key features of MobilityFirst FIA are the GUID naming scheme and the storage aware routing. In this demo, we show that such features can be implemented on an OpenFlow switch by using appropriate control programs. Additionally, we also show that client mobility can be handled seamlessly in an OpenFlow set up.

Participants:

  • Aravind Krishnamoorthy, Aravind Krishnamoorthy

OFUWI: Network Coding

Our demo in GEC 15 will focus on delivering our progress on Network Coding project. Network Coding is addressing multiple wireless issues. We will present a poster with our current results.

Participants:

  • Nairan Zhang, Nairan Zhang

SENSORKITS

The GENI Sensor Kits using Wireless Sensor Networks project will demonstrate experiments designed for teaching science topics to secondary school students using GENI infrastructure.

Participants:

WiMAX at NYU-Poly

We will demonstrate a protocol we have implemented for cooperative packet recovery over heterogeneous networks (e.g. GENI WiMAX and WiFi). This experiment (and several others) will be also featured in the GENI WiMAX tutorial at GEC15.

Participants:

  • Fraida Fund

WiRover

Wisconsin Wireless and NetworkinG Systems (WiNGS) laboratory, Cisco Systems, WiRover demo uilizing multiple interfaces.

Participants:

2.20 Wireless Demos at GEC16

Vertical Handoff Using OpenFlow

This demonstration will show how OpenFlow, Open vSwitch, and the Floodlight controller can be used as a vertical handoff solution between different network interfaces. Traffic will be generated from a server application, and with the handoff solution, will be sent using various networking interfaces to a client. The client will receive the traffic from the server. The interfaces used on the server will be alternated to show the handoff process.

Participants:

  • Ryan Izard, Ryan Izard

Network Coding on ProtoGENI for Vehicular Networks

Network coding using ProtoGENI testbed will be demonstrated. By implementing network coding and multipath forwarding capabilities in the core network, this demo is designed for supporting efficient broadband data delivery in infrastructure-based vehicular networks at Clemson.

Participants:

Supporting MobilityFirst in OpenFlow Based SDNs

MobilityFirst (clean slate FIA project) has some unique features such as a globally unique naming scheme (GUID), storage aware routing etc. In this demo, we use GENI resources to show that such experimental non IP features can be enabled using OpenFlow based SDNs, by writing appropriate control programs that handle them.

Participants:

  • Aravind Krishnamoorthy, Aravind Krishnamoorthy

WiMAX Prototyping in Metro Detroit

Our initial coverage measurement and the tools we have developed to facilitate the road tests will be presented. We will also show the OpenXC platform and its integration with GENI, which may well benefit Wireless Vehicular Networking by offering you more insights into your car's operation.

Participants:

Mobility Services Engine

A Demonstration of the Mobility Services Engine (MSE). This will be a live demonstration of the MSE using a laptop client. We will highlight some of the measurement capabilities of the system.

Participants:

MobilityFirst Network API use in Mobile Applications

One of the key feature of the proposed MobilityFirst protocol stack is the service flexibility, with particular emphasis on multicasting and anycasting. In the demo we will show how this network service features could be easily exploited to enhance the capabilities of mobile applications through the use of the network API.

Participants:

WiMAX at NYU-Poly

Demonstration of wireless lab exercises utilizing GENI WiMAX resources.

Participants:

  • Fraida Fund

WiMAX DDoS Reverse Engineering

Our WiMAX research involves analyzing the cross-layer affects of the system parameters used for the Bandwidth Contention Process. We are specifically looking at how these parameters affect a subscriber station's (SS) throughput, packet loss rates, and vulnerability to Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks. Software simulations use the NS-2 simulator and hardware simulations are being conducted on ORBIT. The parameters investigated are request retires, backoff start, backoff end and frame duration.

Participants:

Freedom of Internet

Freedom of Internet is a project that aims to bring full interent accesss including annonmity of user to areas of West Africa where montioring and blocking is common practice. The project uses a variety of resources including Seattle resources.

Participants:

2.21 Wireless Papers at Second GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE2013)

link

GENI WiMAX Performance Evaluation and Comparison of Two Campus Testbeds

link

WiMAX in the Classroom Designing a Cellular Networking Hands-on Lab

link

Malware Detection for Mobile Devices Using Software Defined Networking

link

Network Coding for Efficient Broadband Data Delivery in Infrastructure-based Vehicular Networks with OpenFlow

link

Cloud-based Handoff as a Service for Heterogeneous Vehicular Networks with OpenFlow

link

3. Tutorials

3.1 OML Tutorial at GEC9

slides

3.2 OMF/OML Tutorial at GEC10

link

3.3 GENI WiMAX Tutorial at GEC13

link

3.4 GENI WiMAX Tutorial at TridentCom 2012 on June 11, 2012

link

setup

3.5 OMF Tutorial at GEC14

link

3.6 GENI WiMAX Tutorial at GEC14

link

3.7 GENI WiMAX Tutorial at GEC15

link

3.8 GENI WiMAX Tutorial at GEC16

Experimentation with WiMAX and GIMI at GEC16