wiki:PlasticSlices/Experiments

Version 4 (modified by Josh Smift, 9 years ago) (diff)

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This page describes the procedure for setting up, running, and cleaning up each of the experiments that we're running for the Plastic Slices project.

In each experiment, it assumes you've already created your slice and all of its slivers, and divided your compute resources into "clients" and "servers" (the meaning of which will vary depending on the particular experiment).

GigaPing

This experiment uses the 'ping' command to send 1 GB of data via ICMP.

Setup

Divide the hosts that you want to use into pairs. The client is the one that you'll run the 'ping' command on; the server is the one that you'll ping from the client.

Identify the precise IP address on each server that you'll want to ping. Make a table to keep track of which server you'll want to ping from each client, e.g.

client server server address
ganel.gpolab.bbn.com planetlab5.clemson.edu server=10.42.101.105
planetlab4.clemson.edu pl5.myplc.grnoc.iu.edu server=10.42.101.73
of-planet1.stanford.edu wings-openflow-3.wail.wisc.edu server=10.42.101.96

You'll use the "server=<ipaddr>" parts when you run the experiment.

To send 1 GB of data, you'll need to send a total of 666,667 1.5 KB packets. Rounding up for simplicity, divide 700,000 by the number of host pairs you have (the number of rows in your table); call this number <count>, and use it below when you run the 'ping' commands.

Execution

On each client, run

server=<ipaddr>
sudo ping -i .001 -s $((1500-8-20)) -c <count> $server

using the "server=<ipaddr>" line from your table, and the <count> value you calculated earlier.

That should print many lines on your terminal that look like

1480 bytes from <ipaddr>: icmp_seq=44 ttl=64 time=135 ms
1480 bytes from <ipaddr>: icmp_seq=49 ttl=64 time=87.7 ms
1480 bytes from <ipaddr>: icmp_seq=50 ttl=64 time=77.9 ms

and then finish with a section that looks like

--- <ipaddr> ping statistics ---
<count> packets transmitted, <count> received, 0% packet loss, time 5229ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 59.376/70.448/522.011/57.578 ms, pipe 55

Copy that final block for your results.

Results

The results of the experiment are the three-line statistics summary at the end of the output on the client.

Cleanup

No special cleanup is needed.

GigaNetcat

This experiment uses the 'netcat' command to send 1 GB of data via unencrypted TCP.

Setup

Divide the hosts that you want to use into pairs. You'll run a netcat listener on the server, and make a netcat connection to it from the client.

Identify the precise IP address on each server that you'll want to connect to. Make a table to keep track of which server you'll want to connect to from each client, e.g.

client server server address
ganel.gpolab.bbn.com planetlab5.clemson.edu server=10.42.101.105
planetlab4.clemson.edu pl5.myplc.grnoc.iu.edu server=10.42.101.73
of-planet1.stanford.edu wings-openflow-3.wail.wisc.edu server=10.42.101.96

You'll use the "server=<ipaddr>" parts when you run the experiment.

Identify a port that you'd like to use for the connection; call it <port>, and use it below when you run the netcat server and client commands.

Identify a file that you'd like to transfer from the servers to the clients; call it <file>. Find out how many times you'll need to copy it to get more than 1 GB:

echo $((10**9/$(du -b <file> | awk '{print $1;}')+1))

Divide that number by the number of host pairs you have (the number of rows in your table); call this number <count>, and use it below when you run the netcat client command.

Copy the file to each of the servers. (When you run the experiment, you'll download it repeatedly from each of the clients.)

On each client and server, install netcat:

sudo yum install nc

Execution

On each server, run

server=<ipaddr>
for i in {1..<count>} ; do nc -l $server <port> < <file> ; echo "completed transfer #$i" ; md5sum <file> ; done

using the "server=<ipaddr>" line from your table, and the <count>, <port>, and <file> values you identified earlier.

You won't seen any output immediately, but when you start running clients, as each transfer completes, you should see lines on your terminal that look like

completed transfer #1

and the md5sum checksum of the file.

On each client, run

server=<ipaddr>
rm -rf ~/giganetcat
mkdir ~/giganetcat
cd ~/giganetcat
for i in {1..<count>} ; do nc $server <port> > <file> ; echo "completed transfer #$i" ; md5sum <file> ; mv <file> <file>.$i ; done

You won't seen any output immediately, but as each transfer completes, you should see lines on your terminal that look like

completed transfer #1

and the md5sum checksum of the file (and the filename).

FIXME: It would be better if this piped to 'tee', to make it easier to compare the output between client and server later.

Results

In each client-server pair, compare the output on the client and the server. They should be identical: Each should list the same set of transfers completed, and all of the md5sum lines should be identical on both.

On each client, check the total size of the data transfered:

du -sb .

Add up the results for all the clients; they should add up to 1 GB (or more).

FIXME: If we had the output from both client and server in a file, we could diff them, and grep for anomalous md5sum lines.

Cleanup

On each client, remove the giganetcat directory:

cd
rm -rf ~/giganetcat

GigaWeb

This experiment uses the HTTPS protocol to send 1 GB of data via encrypted TCP.

GigaPerfTCP

This experiment uses the iperf command to send 1 GB of data via TCP, measuring performance throughout the transfer.

GigaPerfUDP

This experiment uses the iperf command to send 1 GB of data via UDP, measuring performance throughout the transfer.

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