Changes between Version 3 and Version 4 of OpenFlow/CampusTopology


Ignore:
Timestamp:
04/05/11 16:30:21 (8 years ago)
Author:
Josh Smift
Comment:

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  • OpenFlow/CampusTopology

    v3 v4  
    6363 * Some switch firmware will reject the tagged packets coming in on port 8, before the transvl controller sees them. In particular, the HP OpenFlow firmware and NEC Product firmware don't seem to permit this configuration; the NEC Prototype firmware does.
    6464
    65 Its main advantage is that experimenters can translate between any VLAN carried on port 7, without requiring any physical provisioning from campus network admins. (Including in a prospective future scenario in which GENI tools become able to provision new inter-campus VLANs, all the way to port 7.)
     65Its main advantage is that experimenters can translate between any VLAN carried on port 7, without requiring any physical provisioning from campus network admins. (For example, when GENI tools become able to provision new inter-campus VLANs, all the way to port 7.)
    6666
    6767= Hosts =
    6868
    69 Ports 9 and 10 (and so on) are the ports that are connected to the dataplane interfaces on hosts (e.g. MyPLC, ProtoGENI, etc). Their key unusual feature is that they're trunk ports, i.e. they carry multiple tagged VLANs; this requires the hosts that you connect to them to speak 802.1q, aka "VLAN-based subinterfacing". Modern Linux distributions, like Ubuntu and Fedora / Red Hat, do this just fine fine, with interface names like eth1.1700, eth1.3715, etc. Configuring the hosts' dataplane interfaces to trunk ports is the key ingredient that allows experimenters to control which VLANs their compute slivers actually connect to. We're working on detailed guidelines for how campus resource operators can enable this on their hosts, and how experimenters can take advantage of it. ''(FIXME: Replace the previous sentence with a link to a page with more information.)''
     69Ports 9 and 10 (and so on) are the ports that are connected to the dataplane interfaces on hosts (e.g. MyPLC, ProtoGENI, etc). Their key unusual feature is that they're trunk ports, i.e. they carry multiple tagged VLANs; this requires the hosts that you connect to them to speak 802.1q, aka "VLAN-based subinterfacing". Modern Linux distributions, like Ubuntu and Fedora / Red Hat, do this just fine, with interface names like eth1.1700, eth1.3715, etc. Configuring the hosts' dataplane interfaces with 802.1q, and connecting them as trunk ports, is the key ingredient that allows experimenters to control which VLANs their compute slivers actually connect to. We're working on detailed guidelines for how campus resource operators can enable this on their hosts, and how experimenters can take advantage of it. ''(FIXME: Replace the previous sentence with a link to a page with more information.)''