Changes between Version 9 and Version 10 of OpenFlow/CampusTopology


Ignore:
Timestamp:
04/06/11 14:11:30 (8 years ago)
Author:
Josh Smift
Comment:

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  • OpenFlow/CampusTopology

    v9 v10  
    3232
    3333   9    a host         T 1700 1750 3715 3716
    34   10+   another host   T 1700 1750 3715 3716
     34  10    another host   T 1700 1750 3715 3716
     35  11    another host   T 1700 1750 3715 3716
     36  12+   more hosts     T 1700 1750 3715 3716
    3537}}}
    3638
     
    3840
    3941Each of the following sections refers to this diagram to explain how the various options are implmented. The precise port numbers aren't actually important, they're just selected for ease of explanation here.
     42
     43We also have examples of how to configure the interfaces on NEC and HP switches to implement the above topology.
    4044
    4145= Uplink =
     
    7074
    7175Ports 9 and 10 (and so on) are the ports that are connected to the dataplane interfaces on hosts (e.g. MyPLC, ProtoGENI, etc). Their key unusual feature is that they're trunk ports, i.e. they carry multiple tagged VLANs; this requires the hosts that you connect to them to speak 802.1q, aka "VLAN-based subinterfacing". Modern Linux distributions, like Ubuntu and Fedora / Red Hat, do this just fine, with interface names like eth1.1700, eth1.3715, etc. Configuring the hosts' dataplane interfaces with 802.1q, and connecting them as trunk ports, is the key ingredient that allows experimenters to control which VLANs their compute slivers actually connect to. We're working on detailed guidelines for how campus resource operators can enable this on their hosts, and how experimenters can take advantage of it. ''(FIXME: Replace the previous sentence with a link to a page with more information.)''
     76
     77= Example configurations =
     78
     79The following configuration, on an NEC switch (running the Product firmware), will implement the topology in the diagram above:
     80
     81{{{
     82interface gigabitethernet 0/1
     83  switchport mode trunk
     84  switchport trunk allowed vlan 3704,3711,3712,3715,3716
     85
     86interface gigabitethernet 0/3
     87  switchport mode access
     88  switchport access vlan 1750
     89
     90interface gigabitethernet 0/4
     91  switchport mode access
     92  switchport access vlan 3715
     93
     94interface gigabitethernet 0/5
     95  switchport mode access
     96  switchport access vlan 1750
     97
     98interface gigabitethernet 0/6
     99  switchport mode access
     100  switchport access vlan 3716
     101
     102interface gigabitethernet 0/7
     103  switchport mode trunk
     104  switchport trunk allowed vlan 1700,3704,3711,3712,3715,3716
     105
     106interface gigabitethernet 0/8
     107  switchport mode dot1q-tunnel
     108  switchport access vlan 1799
     109
     110interface gigabitethernet 0/9
     111  switchport mode trunk
     112  switchport trunk allowed vlan 1700,1750,3715,3716
     113
     114interface gigabitethernet 0/10
     115  switchport mode trunk
     116  switchport trunk allowed vlan 1700,1750,3715,3716
     117
     118interface gigabitethernet 0/11
     119  switchport mode trunk
     120  switchport trunk allowed vlan 1700,1750,3715,3716
     121
     122interface gigabitethernet 0/12
     123  switchport mode trunk
     124  switchport trunk allowed vlan 1700,1750,3715,3716
     125}}}
     126
     127
     128The following configuration, on an HP switch, will implement the topology in the diagram above:
     129
     130{{{
     131vlan 1700
     132  tagged 7,9-12
     133vlan 1750
     134  tagged 9-12
     135  untagged 3,4
     136vlan 1799
     137  tagged 8
     138vlan 3704
     139  tagged 1,7
     140vlan 3711
     141  tagged 1,7
     142vlan 3712
     143  tagged 1,7
     144vlan 3715
     145  tagged 1,7,9-12
     146  untagged 4
     147vlan 3716
     148  tagged 1,7,9-12
     149  untagged 6
     150}}}