Changes between Version 18 and Version 19 of MEBSandbox/UDTExample


Ignore:
Timestamp:
05/02/12 14:56:15 (7 years ago)
Author:
Mark Berman
Comment:

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  • MEBSandbox/UDTExample

    v18 v19  
    3535server is ready at port: 9000
    3636}}}
    37 On pc2, start a UDT file transfer client, using this command:
     37
     38 * On pc2, start a UDT file transfer client, using this command:
    3839{{{
    3940pc2:~% /local/udt4/app/recvfile pc1 9000 /local/datafiles/sm.10M /dev/null
     
    4445speed = 7.14472Mbits/sec
    4546}}}
     47
    4648 * There are three data files available for transfer tests: '''/local/datafiles/sm.10M''' is 10MB, '''/local/datafiles/med.100M''' is 100MB, and '''/local/datafiles/lg.1G''' is 1GB. Leave your transfer server running on pc1, and try transferring each of these files in turn by typing the appropriate commands on pc2. Keep track of the transfer rates in each case.
     49
    4750 * You can leave your UDT server running or stop it with ctrl-C.
    4851
     
    5255
    5356 * For a TCP-based (FTP) transfer, there's already a FTP server running on pc1. Log into pc2, and start an ftp client:
    54 [[br]]
     57
    5558(You type ''ftp pc1'', the user name ''anonymous'', and any password you want, although your e-mail address is traditional.)
     59
    5660{{{
    5761pc2:~% ftp pc1
     
    6670ftp>
    6771}}}
     72
    6873 * Still on pc2, request a file transfer. Note the reported file size, transfer time, and transfer rate.
     74
    6975{{{
    7076ftp> get med.100M
     
    7581104857600 bytes received in 1.75 secs (58508.9 kB/s)
    7682}}}
     83
    7784 * You can perform additional transfers with additional get commands. When you're done, exit the ftp client with the quit command.
    7885
     
    8188In this experiment, you'll be changing the characteristics of the link and measuring how they affect UDT and TCP performance.
    8289
    83 * Log into your delay node as you do with any other node. Then, on your delay node, use this command:
     90 * Log into your delay node as you do with any other node. Then, on your delay node, use this command:
    8491{{{
    8592%sudo ipfw pipe show
     
    113120
    114121Here are the command sequences you'll need to change your link parameters.
     122In each case, you'll need to provide the correct pipe numbers, if they're different from the example.
    115123
    116124 * To change bandwidth (100M means 100Mbits/s):
     
    138146}}}
    139147
     148 * You can combine settings for bandwidth, delay, and loss by specifying more than one
     149in a single ipfw command. We'll use this form in the procedure below.
     150
    140151== Experiment Procedure ==
    141152
    142 Set your link parameters to use maximum bandwidth, no delay, no packet loss:
     153 * Set your link parameters to use maximum bandwidth, no delay, no packet loss:
    143154
    144155{{{
     
    147158}}}
    148159
    149 Verify with
     160 * Verify with
     161
    150162{{{
    151163sudo ipfw pipe show
     
    157169  0 ipv6-icmp 1610612736                                       ::/0                            ff02::1:ff79:29fb/0         5      378  0    0   0
    158170}}}
     171
     172Note that bandwidth is set to ''unlimited'', delay to ''0 ms'', and no PLR is shown.
     173
     174 * Using this initial setting, try a few UDT transfers, including the larger files. Now try FTP transfers. Record the transfer sizes and rates.
     175
     176 * Now change the link parameters to reduce the available bandwidth to 10Mbps:
     177
     178{{{
     179sudo ipfw pipe 60111 config bw 10M delay 0 plr 0
     180sudo ipfw pipe 60121 config bw 10M delay 0 plr 0
     181}}}
     182
     183 * Repeat your file transfers with the new settings. As before, note the transfer sizes and rates, as well as the link settings.