Changes between Version 17 and Version 18 of MEBSandbox/UDTExample


Ignore:
Timestamp:
05/02/12 14:36:08 (8 years ago)
Author:
Mark Berman
Comment:

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  • MEBSandbox/UDTExample

    v17 v18  
    1818== Setup ==
    1919
    20  1. Download the attached [link:attachment:udt.rspec rspec file] and save it on your machine.
    21  1. Start Flack, create a new slice, load rspec ''udt.rspec'' and submit for sliver creation. (Include a picture here.)
     20 * Download the attached [link:attachment:udt.rspec rspec file] and save it on your machine.
     21 * Start Flack, create a new slice, load rspec ''udt.rspec'' and submit for sliver creation. (Include a picture here.)
    2222
    2323
     
    2828Follow these steps to perform a file transfer using UDT.
    2929
    30  1. Log into pc1 and pc2 in separate windows.
    31  1. On pc1, start a UDT file transfer server, using this command:
     30 * Log into pc1 and pc2 in separate windows.
     31
     32 * On pc1, start a UDT file transfer server, using this command:
    3233{{{
    3334% pc1:~% /local/udt4/app/sendfile
     
    4344speed = 7.14472Mbits/sec
    4445}}}
    45  1. There are three data files available for transfer tests: '''/local/datafiles/sm.10M''' is 10MB, '''/local/datafiles/med.100M''' is 100MB, and '''/local/datafiles/lg.1G''' is 1GB. Leave your transfer server running on pc1, and try transferring each of these files in turn by typing the appropriate commands on pc2. Keep track of the transfer rates in each case.
    46  1. You can leave your UDT server running or stop it with ctrl-C.
     46 * There are three data files available for transfer tests: '''/local/datafiles/sm.10M''' is 10MB, '''/local/datafiles/med.100M''' is 100MB, and '''/local/datafiles/lg.1G''' is 1GB. Leave your transfer server running on pc1, and try transferring each of these files in turn by typing the appropriate commands on pc2. Keep track of the transfer rates in each case.
     47 * You can leave your UDT server running or stop it with ctrl-C.
    4748
    4849=== File Transfer Using FTP ===
     
    5051Follow these steps to perform a file transfer using FTP.
    5152
    52  1. For a TCP-based (FTP) transfer, there's already a FTP server running on pc1. Log into pc2, and start an ftp client:
     53 * For a TCP-based (FTP) transfer, there's already a FTP server running on pc1. Log into pc2, and start an ftp client:
    5354[[br]]
    5455(You type ''ftp pc1'', the user name ''anonymous'', and any password you want, although your e-mail address is traditional.)
     
    6566ftp>
    6667}}}
    67  1. Still on pc2, request a file transfer. Note the reported file size, transfer time, and transfer rate.
     68 * Still on pc2, request a file transfer. Note the reported file size, transfer time, and transfer rate.
    6869{{{
    6970ftp> get med.100M
     
    7475104857600 bytes received in 1.75 secs (58508.9 kB/s)
    7576}}}
    76  1. You can perform additional transfers with additional get commands. When you're done, exit the ftp client with the quit command.
     77 * You can perform additional transfers with additional get commands. When you're done, exit the ftp client with the quit command.
    7778
    7879=== Viewing and Adjusting link characteristics ===
     
    8081In this experiment, you'll be changing the characteristics of the link and measuring how they affect UDT and TCP performance.
    8182
    82 1. Log into your delay node as you do with any other node. Then, on your delay node, use this command:
     83* Log into your delay node as you do with any other node. Then, on your delay node, use this command:
    8384{{{
    8485%sudo ipfw pipe show
    8586}}}
     87
    8688You'll get something like this:
    8789{{{
     
    9698(Note that your output may appear in a different format, depending on what version of ipfw happens
    9799to be installed on your delay node. However, the key information is still available.)
    98 [[br]]
     100
    99101You'll want to make note of the two pipe numbers, one for each direction of traffic along your link.
    100102In the example above, they are 60111 and 60121.
    101 [[br]]
     103
    102104There are three link characteristics we'll manipulate in this experiment: bandwidth, delay, and packet loss rate.
    103105You'll find their values listed in the ipfw output above.
     
    112114Here are the command sequences you'll need to change your link parameters.
    113115
    114 To change bandwidth (100M means 100Mbits/s):
     116 * To change bandwidth (100M means 100Mbits/s):
    115117{{{
    116118sudo ipfw pipe 60111 config bw 100M
     
    118120}}}
    119121
    120 Request a bandwidth of zero to use the full capacity of the link (unlimited):
     122 * Request a bandwidth of zero to use the full capacity of the link (unlimited):
    121123{{{
    122124sudo ipfw pipe 60111 config bw 0
     
    124126}}}
    125127
    126 To change link delay (delays are measured in ms):
     128 * To change link delay (delays are measured in ms):
    127129{{{
    128130sudo ipfw pipe 60111 config delay 10
     
    130132}}}
    131133
    132 To change packet loss rate (rate is a probability, so 0.001 means 0.1% packet loss):
     134 * To change packet loss rate (rate is a probability, so 0.001 means 0.1% packet loss):
    133135{{{
    134136sudo ipfw pipe 60111 config plr .0001