Changes between Version 16 and Version 17 of MEBSandbox/UDTExample


Ignore:
Timestamp:
05/02/12 14:33:45 (8 years ago)
Author:
Mark Berman
Comment:

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  • MEBSandbox/UDTExample

    v16 v17  
    2020 1. Download the attached [link:attachment:udt.rspec rspec file] and save it on your machine.
    2121 1. Start Flack, create a new slice, load rspec ''udt.rspec'' and submit for sliver creation. (Include a picture here.)
     22
     23
     24== Techniques ==
     25
     26=== File Transfer Using UDT ===
     27
     28Follow these steps to perform a file transfer using UDT.
     29
    2230 1. Log into pc1 and pc2 in separate windows.
    2331 1. On pc1, start a UDT file transfer server, using this command:
     
    3644}}}
    3745 1. There are three data files available for transfer tests: '''/local/datafiles/sm.10M''' is 10MB, '''/local/datafiles/med.100M''' is 100MB, and '''/local/datafiles/lg.1G''' is 1GB. Leave your transfer server running on pc1, and try transferring each of these files in turn by typing the appropriate commands on pc2. Keep track of the transfer rates in each case.
    38  1. Now let's compare the results to a TCP-based (FTP) transfer. On pc2, start an ftp client:
     46 1. You can leave your UDT server running or stop it with ctrl-C.
     47
     48=== File Transfer Using FTP ===
     49
     50Follow these steps to perform a file transfer using FTP.
     51
     52 1. For a TCP-based (FTP) transfer, there's already a FTP server running on pc1. Log into pc2, and start an ftp client:
    3953[[br]]
    4054(You type ''ftp pc1'', the user name ''anonymous'', and any password you want, although your e-mail address is traditional.)
     
    5165ftp>
    5266}}}
    53 Still on pc2, request a file transfer. Note the reported file size, transfer time, and transfer rate.
     67 1. Still on pc2, request a file transfer. Note the reported file size, transfer time, and transfer rate.
    5468{{{
    5569ftp> get med.100M
     
    6074104857600 bytes received in 1.75 secs (58508.9 kB/s)
    6175}}}
     76 1. You can perform additional transfers with additional get commands. When you're done, exit the ftp client with the quit command.
    6277
    63 == Adjusting link characteristics ==
     78=== Viewing and Adjusting link characteristics ===
    6479
    65 Now try changing the characteristics of the link and measuring how they affect UDT and TCP performance. You will need to log into your delay node to change the link characteristics. Then, on your delay node, use this command:
     80In this experiment, you'll be changing the characteristics of the link and measuring how they affect UDT and TCP performance.
    6681
     821. Log into your delay node as you do with any other node. Then, on your delay node, use this command:
    6783{{{
    6884%sudo ipfw pipe show
    6985}}}
    70 
    7186You'll get something like this:
    7287{{{
     
    7893  0 ipv6-icmp 1610612736                                       ::/0                            ff02::1:ff79:29fb/0         5      378  0    0   0
    7994}}}
    80 
    8195This information shows the internal configuration of the "pipes" used to emulate network characteristics.
    8296(Note that your output may appear in a different format, depending on what version of ipfw happens
    8397to be installed on your delay node. However, the key information is still available.)
    84 
     98[[br]]
    8599You'll want to make note of the two pipe numbers, one for each direction of traffic along your link.
    86100In the example above, they are 60111 and 60121.
    87 
     101[[br]]
    88102There are three link characteristics we'll manipulate in this experiment: bandwidth, delay, and packet loss rate.
    89103You'll find their values listed in the ipfw output above.