Changes between Version 50 and Version 51 of GeniTmixCalibTutorial


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Timestamp:
06/19/14 19:57:20 (5 years ago)
Author:
Ben Newton
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  • GeniTmixCalibTutorial

    v50 v51  
    55This page describes how to run calibration experiments with [wiki:GeniTmix Tmix] on GENI nodes.  This tutorial assumes that you are already familiar with basic experimentation with GENI, and that you have access to a machine from which you can execute ssh commands and login to external machines.  If you wish to reserve resources using omni, some version of Linux or Unix running on a PC or virtual machine is required.  The tutorial also assumes basic familiarity with Linux or Unix, and the ability to use a terminal text editor such as emacs, vim or nano.
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    7 Before starting it is important to understand what calibration is, and why it is important.  At run-time Tmix "replays" the exchanges encoded in a set of connection vectors (or c-vecs).  The connection vectors are extracted from traffic captured on a real network link.    Since all of the traffic crossing a busy link cannot generally be replayed using a single pair of nodes, it is customary to split the connection vectors into N pairs of tcvec files.  If all of the traffic observed on a busy link cannot be simulated with just two nodes, what percentage of the traffic can we replay?  How many pairs of nodes do we need to use to simulate all the traffic?  It is exactly these questions that calibration seeks to answer.  Below we will walk through the process of determining how much traffic can be simulated by a single pair of nodes.   
     7Before starting it is important to understand what calibration is, and why it is important.  At run-time Tmix "replays" the exchanges encoded in a set of connection vectors (or c-vecs).  The connection vectors are extracted from traffic captured on a real network link.    Since all of the traffic crossing a busy link cannot generally be replayed using a single pair of nodes, it is customary to split the connection vectors into N pairs of tcvec files.  These can then be used on N pairs of machines to simulate the captured network traffic.  If all of the traffic observed on a busy link cannot be simulated with just two nodes, what percentage of the traffic can we replay?  How many pairs of nodes do we need to use to simulate all the traffic?  It is exactly these questions that calibration seeks to answer.  Below we will walk through the process of determining how much traffic can be simulated by a single pair of nodes.   
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    99== A Reserve Resources on GENI Portal ==