Changes between Version 14 and Version 15 of GENIExperimenter/Tutorials/jacks/GetStart_PartI_IPRoute/Procedure/Execute


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Timestamp:
11/04/14 13:23:18 (4 years ago)
Author:
sedwards@bbn.com
Comment:

--

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  • GENIExperimenter/Tutorials/jacks/GetStart_PartI_IPRoute/Procedure/Execute

    v14 v15  
    8585== 5.  Execute Experiment ==
    8686
    87 === 5.1 Exercise A: Configure Routing ===
     87=== 5.1 Exercise A: Test Connectivity ===
     88
     89==== 5.1.1 Send IP traffic ====
     90The first simple experiment that we will run is to verify the IP connectivity between our hosts.
     91 
     92    a. Check the interfaces of your nodes. In the terminal type:
     93    {{{
     94   sudo ifconfig
     95  }}}
     96    You should see at least three interfaces:
     97      * A single '''control interface'''. This is the interface you use to access the node, e.g. ssh into your host. The control interface is mainly used for control traffic, i.e. traffic for controlling the node and the experiment.
     98      * The '''data interfaces'''. These are the interfaces that are used for sending experimental traffic. These interfaces connect to the other hosts of your experiment through GENI. The links between these interfaces are the ones that allow you to run non-IP experiments. '''The data interfaces are the ones that have an IP address and mask that match what you configured before you reserved your resources.'''
     99    b. Fill in the worksheet, noting the name and  IP address of the control and of the data interfaces for each node. 
     100{{{
     101#!html
     102
     103<table id="Table_02" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="0">
     104        <tr>
     105                <td>
     106                        <img src="http://groups.geni.net/geni/attachment/wiki/GENIExperimenter/Tutorials/Graphics/Symbols-Tips-icon.png?format=raw" width="50" height="50" alt="Tip">
     107               </td>
     108               <td>
     109                    The command prompt on each node may say "NodeA", "NodeB", and "NodeC" respectively.
     110               </td>
     111        </tr>
     112</table>
     113}}} 
     114    c. From NodeA, `ping` the adjacent NodeB '''data plane interface'''. From the terminal window that is logged in to the client type :
     115{{{
     116    ping <NodeB data IP addr> -c 5
     117}}}
     118       For example:
     119{{{
     120    ping 192.168.2.11 -c 5
     121}}}
     122    d. Now, `ping` the NodeB '''control plane interface'''. From the terminal window that is logged in to NodeA type :
     123{{{
     124    ping <NodeB control IP addr> -c 5
     125}}}
     126       For example:
     127{{{
     128    ping 172.17.1.9  -c 5
     129}}}
     130   
     131
     132==== 5.1.2 Install and use `iperf` ====
     133    a. Install the `iperf` software on both NodeA and NodeB:
     134{{{
     135    sudo apt-get install iperf
     136    hash
     137}}}
     138
     139    b. Start an `iperf` server on NodeB:
     140{{{
     141    iperf -s
     142}}}
     143    c. From NodeA, run an `iperf` client via the data plane:
     144{{{
     145    iperf -c <NodeB data IP addr>
     146}}}
     147       For example:
     148{{{
     149    iperf -c 192.168.2.11
     150}}}
     151''What is the bandwidth of this link?''
     152
     153''Why?''
     154    d. On NodeA, run an `iperf` client via the control plane:
     155{{{
     156iperf -c <NodeB control IP addr>
     157}}}
     158       For example:
     159{{{
     160iperf -c 172.17.2.2
     161}}}
     162''What is the bandwidth of this link?''
     163
     164''Why?''
     165    e. Type `CTRL-C` on NodeB to stop the `iperf` server.
     166
     167
     168=== 5.2 Exercise B: Configure Routing ===
     169
    88170{{{
    89171#!html
     
    140222}}}
    141223
    142 === 5.2 Exercise B: Explore the Data and Control Planes ===
    143 
    144 ==== 5.2.1 Send IP traffic ====
    145 The first simple experiment that we will run is to verify the IP connectivity between our hosts.
    146  
    147     a. Check the interfaces of your nodes. In the terminal type:
    148     {{{
    149    sudo ifconfig
    150   }}}
    151     You should see at least three interfaces:
    152       * A single '''control interface'''. This is the interface you use to access the node, e.g. ssh into your host. The control interface is mainly used for control traffic, i.e. traffic for controlling the node and the experiment.
    153       * The '''data interfaces'''. These are the interfaces that are used for sending experimental traffic. These interfaces connect to the other hosts of your experiment through GENI. The links between these interfaces are the ones that allow you to run non-IP experiments. '''The data interfaces are the ones that have an IP address and mask that match what you configured before you reserved your resources.'''
    154     b. Fill in the worksheet, noting the name and  IP address of the control and of the data interfaces for each node. 
    155 {{{
    156 #!html
    157 
    158 <table id="Table_02" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="0">
    159         <tr>
    160                 <td>
    161                         <img src="http://groups.geni.net/geni/attachment/wiki/GENIExperimenter/Tutorials/Graphics/Symbols-Tips-icon.png?format=raw" width="50" height="50" alt="Tip">
    162                </td>
    163                <td>
    164                     The command prompt on each node may say "NodeA", "NodeB", and "NodeC" respectively.
    165                </td>
    166         </tr>
    167 </table>
    168 }}} 
    169     c. From NodeA, `ping` the adjacent NodeB '''data plane interface'''. From the terminal window that is logged in to the client type :
    170 {{{
    171     ping <NodeB data IP addr> -c 5
    172 }}}
    173        For example:
    174 {{{
    175     ping 192.168.2.11 -c 5
    176 }}}
    177     d. Now, `ping` the NodeB '''control plane interface'''. From the terminal window that is logged in to NodeA type :
    178 {{{
    179     ping <NodeB control IP addr> -c 5
    180 }}}
    181        For example:
    182 {{{
    183     ping 172.17.1.9  -c 5
    184 }}}
    185    
    186 
    187 ==== 5.2.2 Install and use `iperf` ====
    188     a. Install the `iperf` software on both NodeA and NodeB:
    189 {{{
    190     sudo apt-get install iperf
    191     hash
    192 }}}
    193 
    194     b. Start an `iperf` server on NodeB:
    195 {{{
    196     iperf -s
    197 }}}
    198     c. From NodeA, run an `iperf` client via the data plane:
    199 {{{
    200     iperf -c <NodeB data IP addr>
    201 }}}
    202        For example:
    203 {{{
    204     iperf -c 192.168.2.11
    205 }}}
    206 ''What is the bandwidth of this link?''
    207 
    208 ''Why?''
    209     d. On NodeA, run an `iperf` client via the control plane:
    210 {{{
    211 iperf -c <NodeB control IP addr>
    212 }}}
    213        For example:
    214 {{{
    215 iperf -c 172.17.2.2
    216 }}}
    217 ''What is the bandwidth of this link?''
    218 
    219 ''Why?''
    220     e. Type `CTRL-C` on NodeB to stop the `iperf` server.
    221 
    222 ==== 5.2.3 Bring down one of NodeB's data interfaces ====
     224=== 5.3 Exercise C: Explore the Data and Control Planes ===
     225
     226
     227==== 5.3.1 Bring down one of NodeB's data interfaces ====
    223228
    224229    a. ExoGENI nodes run a service called "neuca" that managed network interfaces on the node.  To manually adjust the IP address, we must first disable neuca on both nodes.
     
    268273}}}
    269274
    270 ==== 5.2.4 Bring down the server's control interface ====
     275==== 5.3.2 Bring down the server's control interface ====
    271276    a. From NodeA, start pinging NodeB's '''control plane interface''':
    272277{{{