Changes between Version 53 and Version 54 of GENIBibliography


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Timestamp:
05/02/17 11:16:39 (2 years ago)
Author:
Mark Berman
Comment:

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  • GENIBibliography

    v53 v54  
    709709
    710710<li>
     711<b>Bumgardner, V. K. Cody</b>
     712, &quot;Contributions to Edge Computing (Doctoral dissertation).&quot;
     713
     7142017.
     715doi:https://doi.org/10.13023/ETD.2017.086.
     716<a href="http://uknowledge.uky.edu/cs&#x005F;etds/56/">http://uknowledge.uky.edu/cs&#x005F;etds/56/</a>
     717<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Efforts related to Internet of Things (IoT), Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS), Machine to Machine (M2M) technologies, Industrial Internet, and Smart Cities aim to improve society through the coordination of distributed devices and analysis of resulting data. By the year 2020 there will be an estimated 50 billion network connected devices globally and 43 trillion gigabytes of electronic data. Current practices of moving data directly from end-devices to remote and potentially distant cloud computing services will not be sufficient to manage future device and data growth. Edge Computing is the migration of computational functionality to sources of data generation. The importance of edge computing increases with the size and complexity of devices and resulting data. In addition, the coordination of global edge-to-edge communications, shared resources, high-level application scheduling, monitoring, measurement, and Quality of Service (QoS) enforcement will be critical to address the rapid growth of connected devices and associated data. We present a new distributed agent-based framework designed to address the challenges of edge computing. This actor-model framework implementation is designed to manage large numbers of geographically distributed services, comprised from heterogeneous resources and communication protocols, in support of low-latency real-time streaming applications. As part of this framework, an application description language was developed and implemented. Using the application description language a number of high-order management modules were implemented including solutions for resource and workload comparison, performance observation, scheduling, and provisioning. A number of hypothetical and real-world use cases are described to support the framework implementation.
     718</li>
     719<br>
     720
     721
     722
     723<li>
    711724<b>Calyam, P. and Rajagopalan, S. and Selvadhurai, A. and Mohan, S. and Venkataraman, A. and Berryman, A. and Ramnath, R.</b>
    712725, &quot;Leveraging OpenFlow for resource placement of virtual desktop cloud applications.&quot;
     
    840853<li>
    841854<b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
     855, &quot;Global optimization of file availability through replication for efficient file sharing in MANETs.&quot;
     856Network Protocols (ICNP), 2011 19th IEEE International Conference on, Vancouver, AB, Canada, IEEE,
     8572011.
     858doi:10.1109/icnp.2011.6089056.
     859<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2011.6089056">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2011.6089056</a>
     860<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>File sharing applications in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) have attracted more and more attention in recent years. The efficiency of file querying suffers from the distinctive properties of MANETs including node mobility and limited communication range and resource. An intuitive method to alleviate this problem is to create file replicas in the network. However, despite the efforts on file replication, no research has focused on the global optimal replica sharing with minimum average querying delay. Specifically, current file replication protocols in MANETs have two shortcomings. First, they lack a rule to allocate limited resource to different files in order to minimize the average querying delay. Second, they simply consider storage as resource for replicas, but neglect the fact that the file holders' frequency of meeting other nodes also plays an important role in determining file availability. A node having a higher meeting frequency with others provides higher availability to its files. In this paper, we introduce a new concept of resource for file replication, which considers both node storage and meeting frequency. We theoretically study the influence of resource allocation on the average querying delay and derive a resource allocation rule to minimize the average querying delay. We further propose a distributed file replication protocol that follows the rule. The trace-driven experiments on both the real-world GENI testbed and NS-2 show that our protocol can achieve shorter average querying delay at lower cost than current replication protocols, which justifies the correctness of our theoretical analysis and the effectiveness of the proposed protocol.
     861</li>
     862<br>
     863
     864<li>
     865<b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
    842866, &quot;Cont2: Social-Aware Content and Contact Based File Search in Delay Tolerant Networks.&quot;
    843867Proceedings of the 2013 42Nd International Conference on Parallel Processing, IEEE Computer Society, Washington, DC, USA,
     
    846870<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icpp.2013.28">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icpp.2013.28</a>
    847871<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we focus on distributed file search over a delay tolerant network (DTN) formed by mobile devices that exhibit the characteristics of social networks. Current file search methods in MANETs/DTNs are either content-based or contact-based. The former builds routing tables for node contents but is not resilient to high node mobility, while the latter exploits node contact patterns in the social networks but may lead to high latency. Recent research also reveal the importance of interests in realizing efficient file dissemination in DTNs. In this paper, we first analyze node interest and mobility from real traces, which confirms the shortcomings of a contact based method and show the importance of considering both content/interest and contact in file search. We then propose Cont2, a social-aware file search method which leverages both node social interests (content) and contact patterns to enhance search efficiency. First, considering people with common interests tend to share files and gather together, Cont2 virtually groups common-interest nodes into a community to direct file search. Second, considering human mobility follows a certain pattern, Cont2 exploits nodes that have high contact frequency with the queried content. Third, Cont2 also exploits active nodes that have more connections to others as a complementary approach to expedite file search. Trace-driven experimental on the real-world GENI test bed and NS-2 simulator show that Cont2 can significantly improve the search efficiency compared to current methods.
    848 </li>
    849 <br>
    850 
    851 <li>
    852 <b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
    853 , &quot;Global optimization of file availability through replication for efficient file sharing in MANETs.&quot;
    854 Network Protocols (ICNP), 2011 19th IEEE International Conference on, Vancouver, AB, Canada, IEEE,
    855 2011.
    856 doi:10.1109/icnp.2011.6089056.
    857 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2011.6089056">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2011.6089056</a>
    858 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>File sharing applications in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) have attracted more and more attention in recent years. The efficiency of file querying suffers from the distinctive properties of MANETs including node mobility and limited communication range and resource. An intuitive method to alleviate this problem is to create file replicas in the network. However, despite the efforts on file replication, no research has focused on the global optimal replica sharing with minimum average querying delay. Specifically, current file replication protocols in MANETs have two shortcomings. First, they lack a rule to allocate limited resource to different files in order to minimize the average querying delay. Second, they simply consider storage as resource for replicas, but neglect the fact that the file holders' frequency of meeting other nodes also plays an important role in determining file availability. A node having a higher meeting frequency with others provides higher availability to its files. In this paper, we introduce a new concept of resource for file replication, which considers both node storage and meeting frequency. We theoretically study the influence of resource allocation on the average querying delay and derive a resource allocation rule to minimize the average querying delay. We further propose a distributed file replication protocol that follows the rule. The trace-driven experiments on both the real-world GENI testbed and NS-2 show that our protocol can achieve shorter average querying delay at lower cost than current replication protocols, which justifies the correctness of our theoretical analysis and the effectiveness of the proposed protocol.
    859872</li>
    860873<br>
     
    942955<li>
    943956<b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
     957, &quot;Selective Packet Inspection to Detect DoS Flooding Using Software Defined Networking (SDN).&quot;
     958Distributed Computing Systems Workshops (ICDCSW), 2015 IEEE 35th International Conference on, IEEE,
     9592015.
     960doi:10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27.
     961<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27</a>
     962<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software-defined networking (SDN) and Open Flow have been driving new security applications and services. However, even if some of these studies provide interesting visions of what can be achieved, they stop short of presenting realistic application scenarios and experimental results. In this paper, we discuss a novel attack detection approach that coordinates monitors distributed over a network and controllers centralized on an SDN Open Virtual Switch (OVS), selectively inspecting network packets on demand. With different scale of network views and information availability, these two elements collaboratively detect signature constituents of an attack. Therefore, this approach is able to quickly issue an alert against potential threats followed by careful verification for high accuracy, while balancing the workload on the OVS. We have applied this method for detection and mitigation of TCP SYN flood attacks on Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI). This realistic experimentation has provided us with insightful findings helpful toward a systematic methodology of SDN-supported attack detection and containment.
     963</li>
     964<br>
     965
     966<li>
     967<b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    944968, &quot;An SDN-supported collaborative approach for DDoS flooding detection and containment.&quot;
    945969Military Communications Conference, MILCOM 2015 - 2015 IEEE, IEEE,
     
    951975<br>
    952976
    953 <li>
    954 <b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    955 , &quot;Selective Packet Inspection to Detect DoS Flooding Using Software Defined Networking (SDN).&quot;
    956 Distributed Computing Systems Workshops (ICDCSW), 2015 IEEE 35th International Conference on, IEEE,
    957 2015.
    958 doi:10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27.
    959 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27</a>
    960 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software-defined networking (SDN) and Open Flow have been driving new security applications and services. However, even if some of these studies provide interesting visions of what can be achieved, they stop short of presenting realistic application scenarios and experimental results. In this paper, we discuss a novel attack detection approach that coordinates monitors distributed over a network and controllers centralized on an SDN Open Virtual Switch (OVS), selectively inspecting network packets on demand. With different scale of network views and information availability, these two elements collaboratively detect signature constituents of an attack. Therefore, this approach is able to quickly issue an alert against potential threats followed by careful verification for high accuracy, while balancing the workload on the OVS. We have applied this method for detection and mitigation of TCP SYN flood attacks on Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI). This realistic experimentation has provided us with insightful findings helpful toward a systematic methodology of SDN-supported attack detection and containment.
    961 </li>
    962 <br>
    963 
    964 
     977
     978
     979<li>
     980<b>Chin, Tommy and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
     981, &quot;Dynamic generation containment systems (DGCS): A Moving Target Defense approach.&quot;
     9822016 3rd International Workshop on Emerging Ideas and Trends in Engineering of Cyber-Physical Systems (EITEC), IEEE,
     9832016.
     984doi:10.1109/eitec.2016.7503690.
     985<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/eitec.2016.7503690">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/eitec.2016.7503690</a>
     986<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems are critical assets to public utility and manufacturing organizations. These systems, although critical, are prone to numerous cyber security related threats and attacks. To combat such challenges, we propose a Dynamic Generated Containment System (DGCS), a moving target defense model as a method of threat evasion. Under the proposed approach, we employ the use of intrusion detection systems (IDS) in conjunction with virtualization solution - Docker. The proposed approach provides an individual Docker container for each threat detected by our IDS. We conduct several experiments using high performance computing systems to measure and demonstrate our proposed approach.
     987</li>
     988<br>
    965989
    966990<li>
     
    972996<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-42836-9&#x005F;43">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-42836-9&#x005F;43</a>
    973997<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>This paper addresses one major concern on how to secure the location information of a base station in a compromised Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). In this concern, disrupting or damaging the wireless base station can be catastrophic for a WSN. To aid in the mitigation of this challenge, we present Moving Proximity Base Station Defense (MPBSD), a Moving Target Defense (MTD) approach to concealing the location of a base station within a WSN. In this approach, we employ multiple base stations to serve a WSN where one of the multiple base stations is elected to serve the WSN in a specific period of time. Specifically, our approach periodically changes the designation over a period of time to provide obscurity in the location information of the base station. We further evaluate MPBSD using a real-world testbed environment utilizing Wi-Fi frequencies. Our results show that MPBSD is an effective MTD approach to securing base stations for a WSN in term of sensory performance such as end-to-end delay.
    974 </li>
    975 <br>
    976 
    977 <li>
    978 <b>Chin, Tommy and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    979 , &quot;Dynamic generation containment systems (DGCS): A Moving Target Defense approach.&quot;
    980 2016 3rd International Workshop on Emerging Ideas and Trends in Engineering of Cyber-Physical Systems (EITEC), IEEE,
    981 2016.
    982 doi:10.1109/eitec.2016.7503690.
    983 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/eitec.2016.7503690">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/eitec.2016.7503690</a>
    984 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems are critical assets to public utility and manufacturing organizations. These systems, although critical, are prone to numerous cyber security related threats and attacks. To combat such challenges, we propose a Dynamic Generated Containment System (DGCS), a moving target defense model as a method of threat evasion. Under the proposed approach, we employ the use of intrusion detection systems (IDS) in conjunction with virtualization solution - Docker. The proposed approach provides an individual Docker container for each threat detected by our IDS. We conduct several experiments using high performance computing systems to measure and demonstrate our proposed approach.
    985998</li>
    986999<br>
     
    15101523<li>
    15111524<b>Griffioen, J. and Fei, Zongming and Nasir, H. and Wu, Xiongqi and Reed, J. and Carpenter, C.</b>
    1512 , &quot;The design of an instrumentation system for federated and virtualized network testbeds.&quot;
    1513 Network Operations and Management Symposium (NOMS), 2012 IEEE, IEEE,
    1514 2012.
    1515 doi:10.1109/NOMS.2012.6212061.
    1516 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/NOMS.2012.6212061">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/NOMS.2012.6212061</a>
    1517 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Much of the GENI effort in developing network testbeds has been focused on building the control frameworks needed to allocate and initialize the network resources that make up an experiment. We argue that building the instrumentation and measurement system to monitor and capture the behavior of the network is just as important and challenging as setting up the network itself, especially in a virtualized and federated environment where getting information from experimental nodes is too complicated and too much to handle for a typical user. In this paper, we describe the design of an instrumentation and measurement infrastructure that allows users to monitor their experiments. The challenge that virtualization and federation of GENI testbeds bring to instrumentation and monitoring is how to hide the details of instrumentation setup from users so that users do not need to be experts in system administration or network management of virtualized and federated systems, but are still able to ” see” what is going on with their experiments. Our instrumentation tool sets up experiment-specific monitoring infrastructure that is tailored to capture, record, and display only information associated with that experiment. Our tools are currently available in GENI, and we present a simple example of how to use them to instrument an experiment.
    1518 </li>
    1519 <br>
    1520 
    1521 <li>
    1522 <b>Griffioen, J. and Fei, Zongming and Nasir, H. and Wu, Xiongqi and Reed, J. and Carpenter, C.</b>
    15231525, &quot;GENI-Enabled Programming Experiments for Networking Classes.&quot;
    15241526Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE), 2013 Second GENI, IEEE,
     
    15271529<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/gree.2013.30">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/gree.2013.30</a>
    15281530<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Although GENI has been readily embraced by the research community as a testbed for exploring new network architectures and services, its use as an educational tool has not seen the same level of acceptance and usage. There are multiple reasons for this, not the least of which is a lack of good examples showing how to use GENI in an educational setting. This paper attempts to remedy this by describing our experiences using GENI in our networking classes at the University of Kentucky. Using GENI as the experimental basis for the projects in our classes allowed us to leverage several of its rich set of features including its global span of resources, programmability, virtualization, and instrumentation and measurement tools. In particular, we describe two projects that we have used in our networking classes, and we share some of the experience we gained in the process. As a result, these experiences motivated us to develop and integrate new functions into the GENI desktop in order to make it easier to access and control GENI's various resources and tools.
     1531</li>
     1532<br>
     1533
     1534<li>
     1535<b>Griffioen, J. and Fei, Zongming and Nasir, H. and Wu, Xiongqi and Reed, J. and Carpenter, C.</b>
     1536, &quot;The design of an instrumentation system for federated and virtualized network testbeds.&quot;
     1537Network Operations and Management Symposium (NOMS), 2012 IEEE, IEEE,
     15382012.
     1539doi:10.1109/NOMS.2012.6212061.
     1540<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/NOMS.2012.6212061">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/NOMS.2012.6212061</a>
     1541<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Much of the GENI effort in developing network testbeds has been focused on building the control frameworks needed to allocate and initialize the network resources that make up an experiment. We argue that building the instrumentation and measurement system to monitor and capture the behavior of the network is just as important and challenging as setting up the network itself, especially in a virtualized and federated environment where getting information from experimental nodes is too complicated and too much to handle for a typical user. In this paper, we describe the design of an instrumentation and measurement infrastructure that allows users to monitor their experiments. The challenge that virtualization and federation of GENI testbeds bring to instrumentation and monitoring is how to hide the details of instrumentation setup from users so that users do not need to be experts in system administration or network management of virtualized and federated systems, but are still able to ” see” what is going on with their experiments. Our instrumentation tool sets up experiment-specific monitoring infrastructure that is tailored to capture, record, and display only information associated with that experiment. Our tools are currently available in GENI, and we present a simple example of how to use them to instrument an experiment.
    15291542</li>
    15301543<br>
     
    17161729<li>
    17171730<b>Huang, Shufeng and Griffioen, James and Calvert, Ken</b>
     1731, &quot;PVNs: Making Virtualized Network Infrastructure Usable.&quot;
     1732ACM/IEEE Symposium on Architectures for Networking and Communications Systems (ANCS '12),
     17332012.
     1734doi:10.1145/2396556.2396590.
     1735<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2396556.2396590">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2396556.2396590</a>
     1736<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Network virtualization is becoming a fundamental building block of future Internet architectures. Although the underlying network infrastructure needed to dynamically create and deploy custom virtual networks is rapidly taking shape ( e.g., GENI), constructing and using a virtual network is still a challenging and labor intensive task, one best left to experts. In this paper, we present the concept of a Packaged Virtual Network (PVN), that enables normal users to easily download, deploy and use application-specific virtual networks. At the heart of our approach is a PVN Hypervisor that ” runs” a PVN by allocating the virtual network resources needed by the PVN and then connecting the PVN's participants into the network on demand. To demonstrate our PVN approach, we implemented a multicast PVN that runs on the PVN hypervisor prototype using ProtoGENI as the underlying virtual network, allowing average users to create their own private multicast network.
     1737</li>
     1738<br>
     1739
     1740<li>
     1741<b>Huang, Shufeng and Griffioen, James and Calvert, Ken</b>
    17181742, &quot;PVNs: Making virtualized network infrastructure usable.&quot;
    171917432012 ACM/IEEE Symposium on Architectures for Networking and Communications Systems (ANCS),
     
    17211745
    17221746<a href="http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=7846352">http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=7846352</a>
    1723 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Network virtualization is becoming a fundamental building block of future Internet architectures. Although the underlying network infrastructure needed to dynamically create and deploy custom virtual networks is rapidly taking shape ( e.g., GENI), constructing and using a virtual network is still a challenging and labor intensive task, one best left to experts. In this paper, we present the concept of a Packaged Virtual Network (PVN), that enables normal users to easily download, deploy and use application-specific virtual networks. At the heart of our approach is a PVN Hypervisor that ” runs” a PVN by allocating the virtual network resources needed by the PVN and then connecting the PVN's participants into the network on demand. To demonstrate our PVN approach, we implemented a multicast PVN that runs on the PVN hypervisor prototype using ProtoGENI as the underlying virtual network, allowing average users to create their own private multicast network.
    1724 </li>
    1725 <br>
    1726 
    1727 <li>
    1728 <b>Huang, Shufeng and Griffioen, James and Calvert, Ken</b>
    1729 , &quot;PVNs: Making Virtualized Network Infrastructure Usable.&quot;
    1730 ACM/IEEE Symposium on Architectures for Networking and Communications Systems (ANCS '12),
    1731 2012.
    1732 doi:10.1145/2396556.2396590.
    1733 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2396556.2396590">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2396556.2396590</a>
    17341747<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Network virtualization is becoming a fundamental building block of future Internet architectures. Although the underlying network infrastructure needed to dynamically create and deploy custom virtual networks is rapidly taking shape ( e.g., GENI), constructing and using a virtual network is still a challenging and labor intensive task, one best left to experts. In this paper, we present the concept of a Packaged Virtual Network (PVN), that enables normal users to easily download, deploy and use application-specific virtual networks. At the heart of our approach is a PVN Hypervisor that ” runs” a PVN by allocating the virtual network resources needed by the PVN and then connecting the PVN's participants into the network on demand. To demonstrate our PVN approach, we implemented a multicast PVN that runs on the PVN hypervisor prototype using ProtoGENI as the underlying virtual network, allowing average users to create their own private multicast network.
    17351748</li>
     
    23072320
    23082321<li>
     2322<b>Liu, Xuan and Medhi, Deepankar</b>
     2323, &quot;Optimally Selecting Standby Virtual Routers for Node Failures in a Virtual Network Environment.&quot;
     2324IEEE Transactions on Network and Service Management,
     23252017.
     2326doi:10.1109/tnsm.2017.2695492.
     2327<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/tnsm.2017.2695492">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/tnsm.2017.2695492</a>
     2328<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In a virtual network environment, a substrate network provider allocates computing and networking resources for service providers who request virtual networks to be created for particular services, and it also has the capability to provide resilient virtual network management with redundant resources, such as dynamic virtual network restoration from failures. In this work, we consider the situation where the substrate network provider desires to have standby virtual routers ready to serve virtual networks under node failures. Such a failure can affect one or more virtual routers in multiple virtual networks. The goal of our work is to make the optimal selection of standby virtual routers so that virtual networks can be dynamically reconfigured back to their original topologies right after the failures. We present an optimization formulation and a heuristic for this problem. By considering a number of factors, we present numerical studies to show how the optimal selection was affected by those factors, and the proposed heuristic's performance was close to the optimization model when there were sufficient standby virtual routers for each virtual network and the substrate nodes have the capability to support multiple standby virtual routers to be in service concurrently.
     2329</li>
     2330<br>
     2331
     2332
     2333
     2334<li>
    23092335<b>Luna, Nicholas and Shetty, Sachin and Rogers, Tamara and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    23102336, &quot;Assessment of Router Vulnerabilities on PlanetLab Infrastructure for Secure Cloud Computing.&quot;
     
    23992425<li>
    24002426<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     2427, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot;
     2428Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
     24292014.
     2430doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932970.
     2431<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970</a>
     2432<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Networks (SDNs), primarily based on OpenFlow, are being deployed in single domain networks around the world. The popularity of SDNs has given rise to multiple considerations about designing, implementing, and operating Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs), to enable SDNs to interconnect SDN islands and to extend SDNs across multiple domains. These goals can be accomplished only by developing new techniques that extend the single domain orientation of current SDN/OpenFlow approaches to include capabilities for multidomain control, including those for resource discovery, signaling, and dynamic provisioning. Several networking research communities have begun to investigate these concepts. Early architectural models of SDXs have been designed and implemented as prototypes. These SDXs are being used to conduct experiments and to demonstrate the potentials of SDXs.
     2433</li>
     2434<br>
     2435
     2436<li>
     2437<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    24012438, &quot;Next Generation Virtual Network Architecture for Multi-tenant Distributed Clouds: Challenges and Emerging Techniques.&quot;
    24022439Proceedings of the 4th Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     
    24102447<li>
    24112448<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    2412 , &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot;
    2413 Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
    2414 2014.
    2415 doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932970.
    2416 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970</a>
    2417 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Networks (SDNs), primarily based on OpenFlow, are being deployed in single domain networks around the world. The popularity of SDNs has given rise to multiple considerations about designing, implementing, and operating Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs), to enable SDNs to interconnect SDN islands and to extend SDNs across multiple domains. These goals can be accomplished only by developing new techniques that extend the single domain orientation of current SDN/OpenFlow approaches to include capabilities for multidomain control, including those for resource discovery, signaling, and dynamic provisioning. Several networking research communities have begun to investigate these concepts. Early architectural models of SDXs have been designed and implemented as prototypes. These SDXs are being used to conduct experiments and to demonstrate the potentials of SDXs.
    2418 </li>
    2419 <br>
    2420 
    2421 <li>
    2422 <b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    24232449, &quot;Creating environments for innovation: Designing and implementing advanced experimental network research testbeds based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility and the StarLight Exchange.&quot;
    24242450Computer Networks,
     
    24402466<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;24">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;24</a>
    24412467<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Many important societal activities are global in scope, and as these activities continually expand world-wide, they are increasingly based on a foundation of advanced communication services and underlying innovative network architecture, technology, and core infrastructure. To continue progress in these areas, research activities cannot be limited to campus labs and small local testbeds or even to national testbeds. Researchers must be able to explore concepts at scale— to conduct experiments on world-wide testbeds that approximate the attributes of the real world. Today, it is possible to take advantage of several macro information technology trends, especially virtualization and capabilities for programming technology resources at a highly granulated level, to design, implement and operate network research environments at a global scale. GENI is developing such an environment, as are research communities in a number of other countries. Recently, these communities have not only been investigating techniques for federating these research environments across multiple domains, but they have also been demonstration prototypes of such federations. This chapter provides an overview of key topics and experimental activities related to GENI international networking and to related projects throughout the world.
     2468</li>
     2469<br>
     2470
     2471
     2472
     2473<li>
     2474<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei and Grossman, Robert and Nash, Piers and Heath, Alison and Arya, Renuka and Agrawal, Stuti and Zhang, Zhenyu</b>
     2475, &quot;Designing and deploying a bioinformatics software-defined network exchange (SDX): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot;
     24762017 20th Conference on Innovations in Clouds, Internet and Networks (ICIN), Paris, IEEE,
     24772017.
     2478doi:10.1109/icin.2017.7899403.
     2479<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icin.2017.7899403">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icin.2017.7899403</a>
     2480<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>This paper describes a Bioinformatics Software Defined Network Exchange (SDX) or BioSDX, which has been designed, deployed, and demonstrated by a multi-organizational research consortium to enable bioinformatics knowledge discovery supported by dynamic networking services. This BioSDX uses precision networking to support precision medicine. The BioSDX is based on recent technical developments in infrastructure abstraction that enables new types of tools and services utilizing programmable network infrastructure through high levels of resource virtualization. Combined with close integration of programmable cloud computing facilities, the BioSDX is an important advance in supporting the new paradigm of data intensive bioinformatics across multiple disciplines, including computational genomics and precision medicine.
    24422481</li>
    24432482<br>
     
    28112850<li>
    28122851<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
     2852, &quot;Security experimentation using operational systems.&quot;
     2853Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Workshop on Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     28542011.
     2855doi:10.1145/2179298.2179388.
     2856<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2179298.2179388">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2179298.2179388</a>
     2857<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Computers and Internet have evolved into necessary tools for our professional, personal and social lives. As a result of this growing dependence, there is a concern that these systems remain protected and available. This concern increases exponentially when considering systems such as smart power grids. Therefore, research should be conducted to develop effective ways of detecting system anomalies. To have realistic results, the studies should be tested on real systems. However, it is not possible to test these experiments on the live network. With the recent collaboration of Universities and research labs, a new experiment test bed has been established. As a result, experiments can now be implemented on real networks. In our study, we design an experiment to analyze Distributed Denial of Service Attacks (DDoS Attack) on a real network with real Internet traffic. The approach that we use in our study can easily be generalized to apply to smart power grids.
     2858</li>
     2859<br>
     2860
     2861<li>
     2862<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    28132863, &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot;
    28142864First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
     
    28312881<br>
    28322882
    2833 <li>
    2834 <b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    2835 , &quot;Security experimentation using operational systems.&quot;
    2836 Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Workshop on Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
    2837 2011.
    2838 doi:10.1145/2179298.2179388.
    2839 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2179298.2179388">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2179298.2179388</a>
    2840 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Computers and Internet have evolved into necessary tools for our professional, personal and social lives. As a result of this growing dependence, there is a concern that these systems remain protected and available. This concern increases exponentially when considering systems such as smart power grids. Therefore, research should be conducted to develop effective ways of detecting system anomalies. To have realistic results, the studies should be tested on real systems. However, it is not possible to test these experiments on the live network. With the recent collaboration of Universities and research labs, a new experiment test bed has been established. As a result, experiments can now be implemented on real networks. In our study, we design an experiment to analyze Distributed Denial of Service Attacks (DDoS Attack) on a real network with real Internet traffic. The approach that we use in our study can easily be generalized to apply to smart power grids.
    2841 </li>
    2842 <br>
    2843 
    28442883
    28452884
     
    38863925<li>
    38873926<b>Van Vorst, N. and Erazo, M. and Liu, J.</b>
     3927, &quot;PrimoGENI for hybrid network simulation and emulation experiments in GENI.&quot;
     3928Journal of Simulation,
     39292012.
     3930doi:10.1057/jos.2012.5.
     3931<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/jos.2012.5">http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/jos.2012.5</a>
     3932<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) is a community-driven research and development effort to build a collaborative and exploratory network experimentation platform—a 'virtual laboratory' for the design, implementation, and evaluation of future networks. The PrimoGENI project enables real-time network simulation by extending an existing network simulator to become part of the GENI federation to support large-scale experiments involving physical, simulated, and emulated network entities. In this paper, we describe a novel design of PrimoGENI, which aims at supporting realistic, scalable, and flexible network experiments with real-time simulation and emulation capabilities. We present a flexible emulation infrastructure that allows both remote client machines, local cluster nodes running virtual machines, and external networks to seamlessly interoperate with the simulated network running within a designated 'slice' of resources. We present the results of our preliminary validation and performance studies to demonstrate the capabilities as well as limitations of our approach.
     3933</li>
     3934<br>
     3935
     3936<li>
     3937<b>Van Vorst, N. and Erazo, M. and Liu, J.</b>
    38883938, &quot;PrimoGENI: Integrating Real-Time Network Simulation and Emulation in GENI.&quot;
    38893939Principles of Advanced and Distributed Simulation (PADS), 2011 IEEE Workshop on, Nice, France, IEEE,
     
    38923942<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/pads.2011.5936747">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/pads.2011.5936747</a>
    38933943<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) is a community-driven research and development effort to build a collaborative and exploratory network experimentation platform -- a &#x76;&#x0308;irtual laboratory'' for the design, implementation and evaluation of future networks. The PrimoGENI project enables real-time network simulation by extending an existing network simulator to become part of the GENI federation to support large-scale experiments involving physical, simulated and emulated network entities. In this paper, we describe a novel design of PrimoGENI, which aims at supporting realistic, scalable, and flexible network experiments with real-time simulation and emulation capabilities. We present a flexible emulation infrastructure that allows both remote client machines and local cluster nodes running virtual machines to seamlessly interoperate with the simulated network running within a designated &#x73;&#x0308;lice'' of resources. We show the results of our preliminary validation and performance studies to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of our approach.
    3894 </li>
    3895 <br>
    3896 
    3897 <li>
    3898 <b>Van Vorst, N. and Erazo, M. and Liu, J.</b>
    3899 , &quot;PrimoGENI for hybrid network simulation and emulation experiments in GENI.&quot;
    3900 Journal of Simulation,
    3901 2012.
    3902 doi:10.1057/jos.2012.5.
    3903 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/jos.2012.5">http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/jos.2012.5</a>
    3904 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) is a community-driven research and development effort to build a collaborative and exploratory network experimentation platform—a 'virtual laboratory' for the design, implementation, and evaluation of future networks. The PrimoGENI project enables real-time network simulation by extending an existing network simulator to become part of the GENI federation to support large-scale experiments involving physical, simulated, and emulated network entities. In this paper, we describe a novel design of PrimoGENI, which aims at supporting realistic, scalable, and flexible network experiments with real-time simulation and emulation capabilities. We present a flexible emulation infrastructure that allows both remote client machines, local cluster nodes running virtual machines, and external networks to seamlessly interoperate with the simulated network running within a designated 'slice' of resources. We present the results of our preliminary validation and performance studies to demonstrate the capabilities as well as limitations of our approach.
    39053944</li>
    39063945<br>
     
    41834222<li>
    41844223<b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
     4224, &quot;Scaling up applications over distributed clouds with dynamic layer-2 exchange and broadcast service.&quot;
     4225Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
     42262014.
     4227doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932973.
     4228<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973</a>
     4229<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we study the problem of provisioning large-scale virtual clusters over federated clouds connected by multi-domain, layer-2 wide area networks. We first present the virtual cluster request abstraction and the abstraction models for substrate resource pools. Based on these two abstraction models, we developed a novel layer-2 exchange mechanism and an implementation of it in a multi-domain networked cloud environment. The design of the mechanism takes into consideration the realistic constraints in current network and cloud systems. We show that efficient cluster splitting, cloud data center selection and resource allocation algorithms can be developed to provision large-scale virtual clusters across cloud sites. A prototype system has been deployed and integrated into the ExoGENI testbed for about a year, and is being heavily used by scientific and data analytic applications.
     4230</li>
     4231<br>
     4232
     4233<li>
     4234<b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
    41854235, &quot;Capacity of Inter-cloud Layer-2 Virtual Networking.&quot;
    41864236Proceedings of the 2014 ACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, USA, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     
    41894239<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2627566.2627573">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2627566.2627573</a>
    41904240<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Due to the economy of scale of Ethernet networks and available dynamic circuit capability from the major national research and educational networks, VLAN (Virtual LAN) based virtual networking solution has been successfully adopted in some advanced distributed cloud systems. However, there are two major constraints in this adaptation: (1) dynamic circuit service is far from pervasive; (2) there is only limited VLAN tags offered by regional network service providers. In this paper, after examining layer-2 networking in large-scale distributed cloud environments, we present a graph theoretical model to study the network capacity in terms of the number of inter-cloud connections that can co-exist. We further design the algorithms to achieve this capacity for both point-to-point and multi-point inter-cloud connections in both static and dynamic scenarios. We also study a general topology embedding problem based on this model. As tagging is a common mechanism for isolating communication channels in other network layers, the proposed models and algorithms can be extended to optical and IP networks.
    4191 </li>
    4192 <br>
    4193 
    4194 <li>
    4195 <b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
    4196 , &quot;Scaling up applications over distributed clouds with dynamic layer-2 exchange and broadcast service.&quot;
    4197 Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
    4198 2014.
    4199 doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932973.
    4200 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973</a>
    4201 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we study the problem of provisioning large-scale virtual clusters over federated clouds connected by multi-domain, layer-2 wide area networks. We first present the virtual cluster request abstraction and the abstraction models for substrate resource pools. Based on these two abstraction models, we developed a novel layer-2 exchange mechanism and an implementation of it in a multi-domain networked cloud environment. The design of the mechanism takes into consideration the realistic constraints in current network and cloud systems. We show that efficient cluster splitting, cloud data center selection and resource allocation algorithms can be developed to provision large-scale virtual clusters across cloud sites. A prototype system has been deployed and integrated into the ExoGENI testbed for about a year, and is being heavily used by scientific and data analytic applications.
    42024241</li>
    42034242<br>
     
    50115050
    50125051<li>
     5052<b>Bumgardner, V. K. Cody</b>
     5053, &quot;Contributions to Edge Computing (Doctoral dissertation).&quot
     5054
     50552017.
     5056doi:https://doi.org/10.13023/ETD.2017.086.
     5057</li>
     5058<br>
     5059
     5060
     5061
     5062<li>
    50135063<b>Calyam, P. and Rajagopalan, S. and Selvadhurai, A. and Mohan, S. and Venkataraman, A. and Berryman, A. and Ramnath, R.</b>
    50145064, &quot;Leveraging OpenFlow for resource placement of virtual desktop cloud applications.&quot
     
    52085258<li>
    52095259<b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
     5260, &quot;Selective Packet Inspection to Detect DoS Flooding Using Software Defined Networking (SDN).&quot
     5261Distributed Computing Systems Workshops (ICDCSW), 2015 IEEE 35th International Conference on, IEEE,
     52622015.
     5263doi:10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27.
     5264</li>
     5265<br>
     5266
     5267<li>
     5268<b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    52105269, &quot;An SDN-supported collaborative approach for DDoS flooding detection and containment.&quot
    52115270Military Communications Conference, MILCOM 2015 - 2015 IEEE, IEEE,
    521252712015.
    52135272doi:10.1109/milcom.2015.7357519.
    5214 </li>
    5215 <br>
    5216 
    5217 <li>
    5218 <b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    5219 , &quot;Selective Packet Inspection to Detect DoS Flooding Using Software Defined Networking (SDN).&quot
    5220 Distributed Computing Systems Workshops (ICDCSW), 2015 IEEE 35th International Conference on, IEEE,
    5221 2015.
    5222 doi:10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27.
    52235273</li>
    52245274<br>
     
    63616411
    63626412<li>
     6413<b>Liu, Xuan and Medhi, Deepankar</b>
     6414, &quot;Optimally Selecting Standby Virtual Routers for Node Failures in a Virtual Network Environment.&quot
     6415IEEE Transactions on Network and Service Management,
     64162017.
     6417doi:10.1109/tnsm.2017.2695492.
     6418</li>
     6419<br>
     6420
     6421
     6422
     6423<li>
    63636424<b>Luna, Nicholas and Shetty, Sachin and Rogers, Tamara and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    63646425, &quot;Assessment of Router Vulnerabilities on PlanetLab Infrastructure for Secure Cloud Computing.&quot
     
    64486509<li>
    64496510<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     6511, &quot;Next Generation Virtual Network Architecture for Multi-tenant Distributed Clouds: Challenges and Emerging Techniques.&quot
     6512Proceedings of the 4th Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     65132016.
     6514doi:10.1145/2955193.2955194.
     6515</li>
     6516<br>
     6517
     6518<li>
     6519<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    64506520, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot
    64516521Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
    645265222014.
    64536523doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932970.
    6454 </li>
    6455 <br>
    6456 
    6457 <li>
    6458 <b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    6459 , &quot;Next Generation Virtual Network Architecture for Multi-tenant Distributed Clouds: Challenges and Emerging Techniques.&quot
    6460 Proceedings of the 4th Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
    6461 2016.
    6462 doi:10.1145/2955193.2955194.
    64636524</li>
    64646525<br>
     
    647265332016.
    64736534doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;24.
     6535</li>
     6536<br>
     6537
     6538
     6539
     6540<li>
     6541<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei and Grossman, Robert and Nash, Piers and Heath, Alison and Arya, Renuka and Agrawal, Stuti and Zhang, Zhenyu</b>
     6542, &quot;Designing and deploying a bioinformatics software-defined network exchange (SDX): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot
     65432017 20th Conference on Innovations in Clouds, Internet and Networks (ICIN), Paris, IEEE,
     65442017.
     6545doi:10.1109/icin.2017.7899403.
    64746546</li>
    64756547<br>
     
    67876859<li>
    67886860<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
     6861, &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot
     6862First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
     68632012.
     6864
     6865</li>
     6866<br>
     6867
     6868<li>
     6869<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    67896870, &quot;Operational System Testing for Designed in Security.&quot
    67906871Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     
    68036884<br>
    68046885
    6805 <li>
    6806 <b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    6807 , &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot
    6808 First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
    6809 2012.
    6810 
    6811 </li>
    6812 <br>
    6813 
    68146886
    68156887
     
    81778249<li> Abu Obaida, M. </li>
    81788250<li> Adams, George B. </li>
     8251<li> Agrawal, Stuti </li>
    81798252<li> Agyapong, Patrick </li>
    81808253<li> Ahmed, Musa </li>
     
    82048277<li> Araji, B. </li>
    82058278<li> Arora, Anish </li>
     8279<li> Arya, Renuka </li>
    82068280<li> Ascigil, Onur (Ascigil, O.) </li>
    82078281<li> Auge&#769;, Jordan </li>
     
    82568330<li> Brown, Stephanie </li>
    82578331<li> Buffington, Cort </li>
     8332<li> Bumgardner, V. K. Cody </li>
    82588333<li> Byers, John </li>
    82598334<li> Caesar, Matthew </li>
     
    83908465<li> Grandl, Robert </li>
    83918466<li> Griffioen, James (Griffioen, J., Griffioen, Jim) </li>
     8467<li> Grossman, Robert </li>
    83928468<li> Grosso, Paola </li>
    83938469<li> Group, GENI Planning </li>
     
    84118487<li> Hay, Brian </li>
    84128488<li> Hayashi, Michiaki </li>
     8489<li> Heath, Alison </li>
    84138490<li> Heerman, Chris (Heerman, C.) </li>
    84148491<li> Heermann, Chris </li>
     
    85738650<li> McGeer, Sean </li>
    85748651<li> McKeown, Nick (McKeown, N.) </li>
    8575 <li> Medhi, Deep </li>
     8652<li> Medhi, Deepankar (Medhi, Deep) </li>
    85768653<li> Mehani, Olivier </li>
    85778654<li> Mehto, RInkel </li>
     
    86118688<li> Narayanan, Arvind </li>
    86128689<li> Narisetty, RajaRevanth (Narisetty, R.) </li>
     8690<li> Nash, Piers </li>
    86138691<li> Nasir, Hussanmuddin (Nasir, H., Nasir, Hussamuddin) </li>
    86148692<li> Navaz, Abdul </li>
     
    88968974<li> Zhang, Qiao </li>
    88978975<li> Zhang, Yanyong (Zhang, Y. Y., Zhang, Yihua) </li>
     8976<li> Zhang, Zhenyu </li>
    88988977<li> Zhang, Zhi-Li </li>
    88998978<li> Zhao, Shuai </li>