Changes between Version 50 and Version 51 of GENIBibliography


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Timestamp:
01/20/17 17:04:20 (6 years ago)
Author:
Mark Berman
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  • GENIBibliography

    v50 v51  
    396396
    397397<li>
     398<b>Bavier, Andy and McGeer, Rick and Ricart, Glenn</b>
     399, &quot;PlanetIgnite: A Self-Assembling, Lightweight, Infrastructure-as-a-Service Edge Cloud.&quot;
     4002016 28th International Teletraffic Congress (ITC 28), W&#x75;&#x0308;rzburg, Germany, IEEE,
     4012016.
     402doi:10.1109/itc-28.2016.125.
     403<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc-28.2016.125">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc-28.2016.125</a>
     404<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>PlanetIgnite is a general-purpose, Infrastructure-as-a-Service, self-assembling, lightweight edge cloud on virtualized infrastructure with support for single-pane-of-glass distributed application configuration and deployment. This is an entirely new concept. PlanetLab[32], GENI[7], [22], and SAVI[19] are general-purpose IaaS edge clouds, but require top-down installation and dedicated hardware resources at each site and do not offer single- pane-of-glass application deployment. Seattle[11] is a lightweight self-assembling edge cloud that offers single- pane-of-class configuration and control, but developers are restricted to using a subset of Python. PlanetIgnite is a Containers-as-a-Service Edge Cloud which offers Docker Containers to each PlanetIgnite user. A PlanetIgnite node is an off-the-shelf Ubuntu 14.04 Virtual machine with Docker installed, meaning it can be installed on any edge node where a VM with a routable v4 address is available. Adding a PlanetIgnite node to the infrastructure is simple: a site wishing to host a PlanetIgnite node simply downloads the image; on boot, the new PlanetIgnite node registers with the PlanetIgnite portal, which runs a series of acceptance tests. Once complete, the image is registered and the node is added to the set of PlanetIgnite sites.
     405</li>
     406<br>
     407
     408
     409
     410<li>
    398411<b>Bejerano, Y. and Ferragut, J. and Guo, K. and Gupta, V. and Gutterman, C. and Nandagopal, T. and Zussman, G.</b>
    399412, &quot;Experimental Evaluation of a Scalable WiFi Multicast Scheme in the ORBIT Testbed.&quot;
     
    915928<li>
    916929<b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
     930, &quot;Selective Packet Inspection to Detect DoS Flooding Using Software Defined Networking (SDN).&quot;
     931Distributed Computing Systems Workshops (ICDCSW), 2015 IEEE 35th International Conference on, IEEE,
     9322015.
     933doi:10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27.
     934<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27</a>
     935<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software-defined networking (SDN) and Open Flow have been driving new security applications and services. However, even if some of these studies provide interesting visions of what can be achieved, they stop short of presenting realistic application scenarios and experimental results. In this paper, we discuss a novel attack detection approach that coordinates monitors distributed over a network and controllers centralized on an SDN Open Virtual Switch (OVS), selectively inspecting network packets on demand. With different scale of network views and information availability, these two elements collaboratively detect signature constituents of an attack. Therefore, this approach is able to quickly issue an alert against potential threats followed by careful verification for high accuracy, while balancing the workload on the OVS. We have applied this method for detection and mitigation of TCP SYN flood attacks on Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI). This realistic experimentation has provided us with insightful findings helpful toward a systematic methodology of SDN-supported attack detection and containment.
     936</li>
     937<br>
     938
     939<li>
     940<b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    917941, &quot;An SDN-supported collaborative approach for DDoS flooding detection and containment.&quot;
    918942Military Communications Conference, MILCOM 2015 - 2015 IEEE, IEEE,
     
    921945<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/milcom.2015.7357519">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/milcom.2015.7357519</a>
    922946<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Networking (SDN) has the potential to enable novel security applications that support flexible, on-demand deployment of system elements. It can offer targeted forensic evidence collection and investigation of computer network attacks. Such unique capabilities are instrumental to network intrusion detection that is challenged by large volumes of data and complex network topologies. This paper presents an innovative approach that coordinates distributed network traffic Monitors and attack Correlators supported by Open Virtual Switches (OVS). The Monitors conduct anomaly detection and the Correlators perform deep packet inspection for attack signature recognition. These elements take advantage of complementary views and information availability on both the data and control planes. Moreover, they collaboratively look for network flooding attack signature constituents that possess different characteristics in the level of information abstraction. Therefore, this approach is able to not only quickly raise an alert against potential threats, but also follow it up with careful verification to reduce false alarms. We experiment with this SDN-supported collaborative approach to detect TCP SYN flood attacks on the Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI), a realistic virtual testbed. The response times and detection accuracy, in the context of a small to medium corporate network, have demonstrated its effectiveness and scalability.
    923 </li>
    924 <br>
    925 
    926 <li>
    927 <b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    928 , &quot;Selective Packet Inspection to Detect DoS Flooding Using Software Defined Networking (SDN).&quot;
    929 Distributed Computing Systems Workshops (ICDCSW), 2015 IEEE 35th International Conference on, IEEE,
    930 2015.
    931 doi:10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27.
    932 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27</a>
    933 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software-defined networking (SDN) and Open Flow have been driving new security applications and services. However, even if some of these studies provide interesting visions of what can be achieved, they stop short of presenting realistic application scenarios and experimental results. In this paper, we discuss a novel attack detection approach that coordinates monitors distributed over a network and controllers centralized on an SDN Open Virtual Switch (OVS), selectively inspecting network packets on demand. With different scale of network views and information availability, these two elements collaboratively detect signature constituents of an attack. Therefore, this approach is able to quickly issue an alert against potential threats followed by careful verification for high accuracy, while balancing the workload on the OVS. We have applied this method for detection and mitigation of TCP SYN flood attacks on Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI). This realistic experimentation has provided us with insightful findings helpful toward a systematic methodology of SDN-supported attack detection and containment.
    934947</li>
    935948<br>
     
    12871300
    12881301<li>
     1302<b>Fioravanti, Mark E.</b>
     1303, &quot;Digital Quorum Sensing for Self-Organizing Malware (PhD Thesis).&quot;
     1304Melbourne, Florida,
     13052016.
     1306
     1307<a href="https://repository.lib.fit.edu/bitstream/handle/11141/1126/FIORAVANTI-DISSERTATION.pdf?sequence=1&#x0026;&#x0023;38;isAllowed=y">https://repository.lib.fit.edu/bitstream/handle/11141/1126/FIORAVANTI-DISSERTATION.pdf?sequence=1&#x0026;&#x0023;38;isAllowed=y</a>
     1308<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Malware authors present an interesting problem for the security community as they evolve and adapt to overcome network and host defenses. The determined adversary is a special class of malware author who may attempt to disrupt national interests. These adversaries may seek potentially novel Command and Control (C2) channels to coordinate their activities. Isolated and air-gapped networks pose an interesting challenge that these adversaries must adapt to in order to maintain persistence on these networks. In this work we propose that a determined adversary may seek to implement a digital quorum sensing system inspired by the quorum sensing systems used by some bacteria to coordinate their social behaviors. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this research was to characterize a potential digital quorum sensing C2 channel that relies on subtly modifying the global packet distribution on a network. METHODS: A proof of concept was developed and studied to determine if a C2 channel based on quorum sensing is feasible. Based on the results of the proof of concept, a prototype was implemented and studied in a number of different networking environments in order to more fully characterize the signal. The strength of the quorum sensing signal (the independent variable) was adjusted and through a series of statistical tests the statistical significance of the impact on the global packet distribution was determined. RESULTS: Network packet captures were analyzed from several different networks with Friedman tests. When the probability of a delaying packets was approximately in the range of (0.25,0.1) the delay was statistically significant with alpha=0.05 for the global packet distribution but not for the packet counts observed from the individual hosts. Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to determine which portions of the data sets contained statistically significant deviations, at a significance level of 95&#x0025; (alpha=0.05). CONCLUSION: Digital quorum sensing could be used as a novel C2 channel providing a determined adversary a unique method of coordinating activities on a network without allowing the network defender to identify the infected hosts. During the experiment it was observed that this signal is easy to disrupt by altering the time synchronization between the hosts on the network.
     1309</li>
     1310<br>
     1311
     1312
     1313
     1314<li>
    12891315<b>Freeman, PeterA</b>
    12901316, &quot;The GENI Vision: Origins, Early History, Possible Futures.&quot;
     
    14701496<li>
    14711497<b>Griffioen, J. and Fei, Zongming and Nasir, H. and Wu, Xiongqi and Reed, J. and Carpenter, C.</b>
     1498, &quot;The design of an instrumentation system for federated and virtualized network testbeds.&quot;
     1499Network Operations and Management Symposium (NOMS), 2012 IEEE, IEEE,
     15002012.
     1501doi:10.1109/NOMS.2012.6212061.
     1502<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/NOMS.2012.6212061">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/NOMS.2012.6212061</a>
     1503<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Much of the GENI effort in developing network testbeds has been focused on building the control frameworks needed to allocate and initialize the network resources that make up an experiment. We argue that building the instrumentation and measurement system to monitor and capture the behavior of the network is just as important and challenging as setting up the network itself, especially in a virtualized and federated environment where getting information from experimental nodes is too complicated and too much to handle for a typical user. In this paper, we describe the design of an instrumentation and measurement infrastructure that allows users to monitor their experiments. The challenge that virtualization and federation of GENI testbeds bring to instrumentation and monitoring is how to hide the details of instrumentation setup from users so that users do not need to be experts in system administration or network management of virtualized and federated systems, but are still able to ” see” what is going on with their experiments. Our instrumentation tool sets up experiment-specific monitoring infrastructure that is tailored to capture, record, and display only information associated with that experiment. Our tools are currently available in GENI, and we present a simple example of how to use them to instrument an experiment.
     1504</li>
     1505<br>
     1506
     1507<li>
     1508<b>Griffioen, J. and Fei, Zongming and Nasir, H. and Wu, Xiongqi and Reed, J. and Carpenter, C.</b>
    14721509, &quot;GENI-Enabled Programming Experiments for Networking Classes.&quot;
    14731510Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE), 2013 Second GENI, IEEE,
     
    14761513<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/gree.2013.30">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/gree.2013.30</a>
    14771514<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Although GENI has been readily embraced by the research community as a testbed for exploring new network architectures and services, its use as an educational tool has not seen the same level of acceptance and usage. There are multiple reasons for this, not the least of which is a lack of good examples showing how to use GENI in an educational setting. This paper attempts to remedy this by describing our experiences using GENI in our networking classes at the University of Kentucky. Using GENI as the experimental basis for the projects in our classes allowed us to leverage several of its rich set of features including its global span of resources, programmability, virtualization, and instrumentation and measurement tools. In particular, we describe two projects that we have used in our networking classes, and we share some of the experience we gained in the process. As a result, these experiences motivated us to develop and integrate new functions into the GENI desktop in order to make it easier to access and control GENI's various resources and tools.
    1478 </li>
    1479 <br>
    1480 
    1481 <li>
    1482 <b>Griffioen, J. and Fei, Zongming and Nasir, H. and Wu, Xiongqi and Reed, J. and Carpenter, C.</b>
    1483 , &quot;The design of an instrumentation system for federated and virtualized network testbeds.&quot;
    1484 Network Operations and Management Symposium (NOMS), 2012 IEEE, IEEE,
    1485 2012.
    1486 doi:10.1109/NOMS.2012.6212061.
    1487 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/NOMS.2012.6212061">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/NOMS.2012.6212061</a>
    1488 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Much of the GENI effort in developing network testbeds has been focused on building the control frameworks needed to allocate and initialize the network resources that make up an experiment. We argue that building the instrumentation and measurement system to monitor and capture the behavior of the network is just as important and challenging as setting up the network itself, especially in a virtualized and federated environment where getting information from experimental nodes is too complicated and too much to handle for a typical user. In this paper, we describe the design of an instrumentation and measurement infrastructure that allows users to monitor their experiments. The challenge that virtualization and federation of GENI testbeds bring to instrumentation and monitoring is how to hide the details of instrumentation setup from users so that users do not need to be experts in system administration or network management of virtualized and federated systems, but are still able to ” see” what is going on with their experiments. Our instrumentation tool sets up experiment-specific monitoring infrastructure that is tailored to capture, record, and display only information associated with that experiment. Our tools are currently available in GENI, and we present a simple example of how to use them to instrument an experiment.
    14891515</li>
    14901516<br>
     
    16101636
    16111637<li>
     1638<b>Hemmings, Matthew and Ingalls, Daniel and Krahn, Robert and McGeer, Rick and Ricart, Glenn and Roder, Marko and Stege, Ulrike</b>
     1639, &quot;LiveTalk: A Framework for Collaborative Browser-Based Replicated-Computation Applications.&quot;
     16402016 28th International Teletraffic Congress (ITC 28), W&#x75;&#x0308;rzburg, Germany, IEEE,
     16412016.
     1642doi:10.1109/itc-28.2016.144.
     1643<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc-28.2016.144">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc-28.2016.144</a>
     1644<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper we describe LiveTalk, a framework for Collaborative Browser-based Replicated-Computation applications. LiveTalk permits multiple users separated across the wide area to interact with separate copies of a single application, sharing a single virtual workspace, using very little network bandwidth. LiveTalk features an integrated, browser-based programming environment with native graphics and live evaluation, an integrated, pluggable web server, and a simple messaging service that serves to coordinate activity on shared application sessions, and provides for multiple, mutually-isolated sessions. The first use case for LiveTalk are collaborative big-data visualizations running on thin-client devices such as cellular phones, tablets, and netbooks. These applications form part of a new class of application where the distributed Cloud is leveraged to provide low latency, and high-bandwidth access to geographically disparate users while maintaining the feel of immediacy associated with local computation. The primary motivation of this work is to permit low latency, collaborative applications to be built quickly and easily, while requiring no setup for use by the end-user.
     1645</li>
     1646<br>
     1647
     1648
     1649
     1650<li>
    16121651<b>Herron, Jon-Paul</b>
    16131652, &quot;GENI Meta-Operations Center.&quot;
     
    19471986<li>
    19481987<b>Krishnappa, Dilip K. and Lyons, Eric and Irwin, David and Zink, Michael</b>
    1949 , &quot;Performance of GENI Cloud Testbeds for Real Time Scientific Application.&quot;
    1950 First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
    1951 2012.
    1952 
    1953 
    1954 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Dedicating high end servers for short-term execution of scientific applications such as weather forecasting wastes resources. Cloud platforms IaaS model seems well suited for applications which are executed on an irregular basis and for short duration. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of research testbed cloud platforms such as GENICloud and ORCA cloud clusters for our real-time scientific application of short-term weather forecasting called Nowcasting. In this paper, we evaluate the network capabilities of these research cloud testbeds for our real-time application of weather forecasting. In addition, we evaluate the computation time of executing Nowcasting on each cloud platform for weather data collected from real weather events. We also evaluate the total time taken to generate and transmit short-term forecast images to end users with live data from our own radar on campus. We also compare the performance of each of these clusters for Nowcasting with commercial cloud services such as Amazon's EC2. The results obtained from our measurement show that cloud testbeds are suitable for real-time application experiments to be carried out on a cloud platform.
    1955 </li>
    1956 <br>
    1957 
    1958 <li>
    1959 <b>Krishnappa, Dilip K. and Lyons, Eric and Irwin, David and Zink, Michael</b>
    19601988, &quot;Network capabilities of cloud services for a real time scientific application.&quot;
    1961198937th Annual IEEE Conference on Local Computer Networks, Clearwater Beach, FL, USA, IEEE,
     
    19671995<br>
    19681996
     1997<li>
     1998<b>Krishnappa, Dilip K. and Lyons, Eric and Irwin, David and Zink, Michael</b>
     1999, &quot;Performance of GENI Cloud Testbeds for Real Time Scientific Application.&quot;
     2000First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
     20012012.
     2002
     2003
     2004<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Dedicating high end servers for short-term execution of scientific applications such as weather forecasting wastes resources. Cloud platforms IaaS model seems well suited for applications which are executed on an irregular basis and for short duration. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of research testbed cloud platforms such as GENICloud and ORCA cloud clusters for our real-time scientific application of short-term weather forecasting called Nowcasting. In this paper, we evaluate the network capabilities of these research cloud testbeds for our real-time application of weather forecasting. In addition, we evaluate the computation time of executing Nowcasting on each cloud platform for weather data collected from real weather events. We also evaluate the total time taken to generate and transmit short-term forecast images to end users with live data from our own radar on campus. We also compare the performance of each of these clusters for Nowcasting with commercial cloud services such as Amazon's EC2. The results obtained from our measurement show that cloud testbeds are suitable for real-time application experiments to be carried out on a cloud platform.
     2005</li>
     2006<br>
     2007
    19692008
    19702009
     
    19982037<b>Lara, Adrian and Mukherjee, Shreyasee and Ramamurthy, Byrav and Raychaudhuri, Dipankar and Ramakrishnan, K. K.</b>
    19992038, &quot;Inter-Domain Routing with Cut-Through Switching for the MobilityFirst Future Internet Architecture.&quot;
    2000 EEE International Conference on Communications (ICC 2016), Kuala Lumpur,
    2001 2016.
    2002 
    2003 
     2039IEEE International Conference on Communications (ICC 2016), Kuala Lumpur,
     20402016.
     2041doi:10.1109/ICC.2016.7510715.
     2042<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICC.2016.7510715">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICC.2016.7510715</a>
    20042043<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Future Internet projects such as MobilityFirst and Named Data Networking have proposed novel mechanisms to replace the Internet Protocol to better support content delivery and mobility. However, the problem of efficient data transfer across the network core has not been adequately investigated. We tackle the challenge of inter-domain cut-through switching using software-defined networking (SDN). First, we propose and solve an optimization problem that minimizes the total transfer time using inter-domain tunnels. Second, we propose an SDN-based routing framework for the MobilityFirst architecture capable of dynamically creating such tunnels. The main novelty of this framework is to name tunnels as network objects to simplify how tunnels are created and maintained. To validate our framework, we implement on the GENI (Global Environment for Network Innovations) testbed a prototype for the MobilityFirst architecture. Our experiments with the optimization problem show that the inter-domain latency between controllers plays a key role on how tunnels are setup. Furthermore, our implementation experiments show that the control plane delay can be reduced by 75&#x0025; when using inter- domain tunnels. Finally, we show how our framework needs fewer messages than current protocols such as label distribution protocol (LDP) to setup intra-domain and inter-domain tunnels.
    20052044</li>
     
    23462385<li>
    23472386<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     2387, &quot;Next Generation Virtual Network Architecture for Multi-tenant Distributed Clouds: Challenges and Emerging Techniques.&quot;
     2388Proceedings of the 4th Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     23892016.
     2390doi:10.1145/2955193.2955194.
     2391<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2955193.2955194">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2955193.2955194</a>
     2392<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Providing services for multiple tenants within a single or federated distributed cloud environment requires a variety of special considerations related to network design, provisioning, and operations. Especially important are multiple topics concerning the implementation of multiple parallel programmable virtual networks for large numbers of tenants, who require autonomous management, control, and data planes. This paper provides an overview of some of the challenges that arise from developing and implementing parallel programmable virtual networks, describes experiences with several experimental techniques for addressing those challenges based on large scale distributed testbeds, and presents the results of the experiments that were conducted. Distributed environments used include a distributed cloud testbed, the Chameleon Cloud, sponsored by the National Science Foundation's NSFCloud program, the NSF's Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI), an international distributed OpenFlow testbed, and the Open Science Data Cloud.
     2393</li>
     2394<br>
     2395
     2396<li>
     2397<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    23482398, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot;
    23492399Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
     
    23522402<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970</a>
    23532403<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Networks (SDNs), primarily based on OpenFlow, are being deployed in single domain networks around the world. The popularity of SDNs has given rise to multiple considerations about designing, implementing, and operating Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs), to enable SDNs to interconnect SDN islands and to extend SDNs across multiple domains. These goals can be accomplished only by developing new techniques that extend the single domain orientation of current SDN/OpenFlow approaches to include capabilities for multidomain control, including those for resource discovery, signaling, and dynamic provisioning. Several networking research communities have begun to investigate these concepts. Early architectural models of SDXs have been designed and implemented as prototypes. These SDXs are being used to conduct experiments and to demonstrate the potentials of SDXs.
    2354 </li>
    2355 <br>
    2356 
    2357 <li>
    2358 <b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    2359 , &quot;Next Generation Virtual Network Architecture for Multi-tenant Distributed Clouds: Challenges and Emerging Techniques.&quot;
    2360 Proceedings of the 4th Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
    2361 2016.
    2362 doi:10.1145/2955193.2955194.
    2363 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2955193.2955194">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2955193.2955194</a>
    2364 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Providing services for multiple tenants within a single or federated distributed cloud environment requires a variety of special considerations related to network design, provisioning, and operations. Especially important are multiple topics concerning the implementation of multiple parallel programmable virtual networks for large numbers of tenants, who require autonomous management, control, and data planes. This paper provides an overview of some of the challenges that arise from developing and implementing parallel programmable virtual networks, describes experiences with several experimental techniques for addressing those challenges based on large scale distributed testbeds, and presents the results of the experiments that were conducted. Distributed environments used include a distributed cloud testbed, the Chameleon Cloud, sponsored by the National Science Foundation's NSFCloud program, the NSF's Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI), an international distributed OpenFlow testbed, and the Open Science Data Cloud.
    23652404</li>
    23662405<br>
     
    27342773<li>
    27352774<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
     2775, &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot;
     2776First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
     27772012.
     2778
     2779
     2780<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks are major security threats to the Internet. The distributed structure of these attacks makes it difficult to distinguish between legitimate and attack traffic, making detection difficult. In addition to this challenge, researchers also have to study and find countermeasures against these attacks without using an operational network for testing, since attacks on operational networks inconvenience users. In this paper, we propose a method to perform DDoS analysis on real hardware using real traffic without jeopardizing the original network. We implement our experiments on the Geni testbed using Openflow. We present results from DDoS detection methods using operational traffic.
     2781</li>
     2782<br>
     2783
     2784<li>
     2785<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    27362786, &quot;Operational System Testing for Designed in Security.&quot;
    27372787Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     
    27542804<br>
    27552805
    2756 <li>
    2757 <b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    2758 , &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot;
    2759 First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
    2760 2012.
    2761 
    2762 
    2763 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks are major security threats to the Internet. The distributed structure of these attacks makes it difficult to distinguish between legitimate and attack traffic, making detection difficult. In addition to this challenge, researchers also have to study and find countermeasures against these attacks without using an operational network for testing, since attacks on operational networks inconvenience users. In this paper, we propose a method to perform DDoS analysis on real hardware using real traffic without jeopardizing the original network. We implement our experiments on the Geni testbed using Openflow. We present results from DDoS detection methods using operational traffic.
    2764 </li>
    2765 <br>
    2766 
    27672806
    27682807
     
    33013340
    33023341<li>
     3342<b>Shamim, Sumaira and Fei, Zongming</b>
     3343, &quot;Evaluating a QoS aware path selection service using the GENI network.&quot;
     33442016 IEEE International Conference on Ubiquitous Wireless Broadband (ICUWB), Nanjing, China, IEEE,
     33452016.
     3346doi:10.1109/icuwb.2016.7790581.
     3347<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icuwb.2016.7790581">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icuwb.2016.7790581</a>
     3348<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Smart homes, cars, offices and schools can significantly improve the quality of our life. The traditional networks are not sufficient to provide the service needed for these future smart management systems due to their lack of flexibility. This paper proposes an application-aware service that can select and set an alternative forwarding path based on the measurement of the Quality of Service of paths in the software defined networks. The proposed service is evaluated by developing experiments using the GENI network. The results demonstrate that our service can make routing decisions based on the application requirement and measurement about the current state of the network, and greatly improve the routing performance over the default method used in existing networks.
     3349</li>
     3350<br>
     3351
     3352
     3353
     3354<li>
    33033355<b>Sharma, Navin and Gummeson, Jeremy and Irwin, David and Shenoy, Prashant</b>
    33043356, &quot;Cloudy Computing: Leveraging Weather Forecasts in Energy Harvesting Sensor Systems.&quot;
     
    37703822<li>
    37713823<b>Van Vorst, N. and Erazo, M. and Liu, J.</b>
     3824, &quot;PrimoGENI for hybrid network simulation and emulation experiments in GENI.&quot;
     3825Journal of Simulation,
     38262012.
     3827doi:10.1057/jos.2012.5.
     3828<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/jos.2012.5">http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/jos.2012.5</a>
     3829<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) is a community-driven research and development effort to build a collaborative and exploratory network experimentation platform—a 'virtual laboratory' for the design, implementation, and evaluation of future networks. The PrimoGENI project enables real-time network simulation by extending an existing network simulator to become part of the GENI federation to support large-scale experiments involving physical, simulated, and emulated network entities. In this paper, we describe a novel design of PrimoGENI, which aims at supporting realistic, scalable, and flexible network experiments with real-time simulation and emulation capabilities. We present a flexible emulation infrastructure that allows both remote client machines, local cluster nodes running virtual machines, and external networks to seamlessly interoperate with the simulated network running within a designated 'slice' of resources. We present the results of our preliminary validation and performance studies to demonstrate the capabilities as well as limitations of our approach.
     3830</li>
     3831<br>
     3832
     3833<li>
     3834<b>Van Vorst, N. and Erazo, M. and Liu, J.</b>
    37723835, &quot;PrimoGENI: Integrating Real-Time Network Simulation and Emulation in GENI.&quot;
    37733836Principles of Advanced and Distributed Simulation (PADS), 2011 IEEE Workshop on, Nice, France, IEEE,
     
    37763839<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/pads.2011.5936747">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/pads.2011.5936747</a>
    37773840<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) is a community-driven research and development effort to build a collaborative and exploratory network experimentation platform -- a &#x76;&#x0308;irtual laboratory'' for the design, implementation and evaluation of future networks. The PrimoGENI project enables real-time network simulation by extending an existing network simulator to become part of the GENI federation to support large-scale experiments involving physical, simulated and emulated network entities. In this paper, we describe a novel design of PrimoGENI, which aims at supporting realistic, scalable, and flexible network experiments with real-time simulation and emulation capabilities. We present a flexible emulation infrastructure that allows both remote client machines and local cluster nodes running virtual machines to seamlessly interoperate with the simulated network running within a designated &#x73;&#x0308;lice'' of resources. We show the results of our preliminary validation and performance studies to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of our approach.
    3778 </li>
    3779 <br>
    3780 
    3781 <li>
    3782 <b>Van Vorst, N. and Erazo, M. and Liu, J.</b>
    3783 , &quot;PrimoGENI for hybrid network simulation and emulation experiments in GENI.&quot;
    3784 Journal of Simulation,
    3785 2012.
    3786 doi:10.1057/jos.2012.5.
    3787 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/jos.2012.5">http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/jos.2012.5</a>
    3788 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) is a community-driven research and development effort to build a collaborative and exploratory network experimentation platform—a 'virtual laboratory' for the design, implementation, and evaluation of future networks. The PrimoGENI project enables real-time network simulation by extending an existing network simulator to become part of the GENI federation to support large-scale experiments involving physical, simulated, and emulated network entities. In this paper, we describe a novel design of PrimoGENI, which aims at supporting realistic, scalable, and flexible network experiments with real-time simulation and emulation capabilities. We present a flexible emulation infrastructure that allows both remote client machines, local cluster nodes running virtual machines, and external networks to seamlessly interoperate with the simulated network running within a designated 'slice' of resources. We present the results of our preliminary validation and performance studies to demonstrate the capabilities as well as limitations of our approach.
    37893841</li>
    37903842<br>
     
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    46294681<li>
     4682<b>Bavier, Andy and McGeer, Rick and Ricart, Glenn</b>
     4683, &quot;PlanetIgnite: A Self-Assembling, Lightweight, Infrastructure-as-a-Service Edge Cloud.&quot
     46842016 28th International Teletraffic Congress (ITC 28), W&#x75;&#x0308;rzburg, Germany, IEEE,
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    46314694, &quot;Experimental Evaluation of a Scalable WiFi Multicast Scheme in the ORBIT Testbed.&quot
     
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    50685131<b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
     5132, &quot;Selective Packet Inspection to Detect DoS Flooding Using Software Defined Networking (SDN).&quot
     5133Distributed Computing Systems Workshops (ICDCSW), 2015 IEEE 35th International Conference on, IEEE,
     51342015.
     5135doi:10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27.
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    50695141, &quot;An SDN-supported collaborative approach for DDoS flooding detection and containment.&quot
    50705142Military Communications Conference, MILCOM 2015 - 2015 IEEE, IEEE,
    507151432015.
    50725144doi:10.1109/milcom.2015.7357519.
    5073 </li>
    5074 <br>
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    5077 <b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    5078 , &quot;Selective Packet Inspection to Detect DoS Flooding Using Software Defined Networking (SDN).&quot
    5079 Distributed Computing Systems Workshops (ICDCSW), 2015 IEEE 35th International Conference on, IEEE,
    5080 2015.
    5081 doi:10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27.
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    50835146<br>
     
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     5446<b>Fioravanti, Mark E.</b>
     5447, &quot;Digital Quorum Sensing for Self-Organizing Malware (PhD Thesis).&quot
     5448Melbourne, Florida,
     54492016.
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    53835457<b>Freeman, PeterA</b>
    53845458, &quot;The GENI Vision: Origins, Early History, Possible Futures.&quot
     
    55365610<li>
    55375611<b>Griffioen, J. and Fei, Zongming and Nasir, H. and Wu, Xiongqi and Reed, J. and Carpenter, C.</b>
     5612, &quot;The design of an instrumentation system for federated and virtualized network testbeds.&quot
     5613Network Operations and Management Symposium (NOMS), 2012 IEEE, IEEE,
     56142012.
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     5620<b>Griffioen, J. and Fei, Zongming and Nasir, H. and Wu, Xiongqi and Reed, J. and Carpenter, C.</b>
    55385621, &quot;GENI-Enabled Programming Experiments for Networking Classes.&quot
    55395622Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE), 2013 Second GENI, IEEE,
    554056232013.
    55415624doi:10.1109/gree.2013.30.
    5542 </li>
    5543 <br>
    5544 
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    5547 , &quot;The design of an instrumentation system for federated and virtualized network testbeds.&quot
    5548 Network Operations and Management Symposium (NOMS), 2012 IEEE, IEEE,
    5549 2012.
    5550 doi:10.1109/NOMS.2012.6212061.
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     5731, &quot;LiveTalk: A Framework for Collaborative Browser-Based Replicated-Computation Applications.&quot
     57322016 28th International Teletraffic Congress (ITC 28), W&#x75;&#x0308;rzburg, Germany, IEEE,
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    56575742, &quot;GENI Meta-Operations Center.&quot
     
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    59406025<b>Krishnappa, Dilip K. and Lyons, Eric and Irwin, David and Zink, Michael</b>
     6026, &quot;Network capabilities of cloud services for a real time scientific application.&quot
     602737th Annual IEEE Conference on Local Computer Networks, Clearwater Beach, FL, USA, IEEE,
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     6029doi:10.1109/lcn.2012.6423665.
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    59416035, &quot;Performance of GENI Cloud Testbeds for Real Time Scientific Application.&quot
    59426036First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
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    5945 </li>
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    5950 , &quot;Network capabilities of cloud services for a real time scientific application.&quot
    5951 37th Annual IEEE Conference on Local Computer Networks, Clearwater Beach, FL, USA, IEEE,
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    5953 doi:10.1109/lcn.2012.6423665.
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    59836068, &quot;Inter-Domain Routing with Cut-Through Switching for the MobilityFirst Future Internet Architecture.&quot
    5984 EEE International Conference on Communications (ICC 2016), Kuala Lumpur,
    5985 2016.
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     6069IEEE International Conference on Communications (ICC 2016), Kuala Lumpur,
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     6071doi:10.1109/ICC.2016.7510715.
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     6363, &quot;Next Generation Virtual Network Architecture for Multi-tenant Distributed Clouds: Challenges and Emerging Techniques.&quot
     6364Proceedings of the 4th Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
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     6366doi:10.1145/2955193.2955194.
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    62786372, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot
    62796373Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
    628063742014.
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    6286 <b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    6287 , &quot;Next Generation Virtual Network Architecture for Multi-tenant Distributed Clouds: Challenges and Emerging Techniques.&quot
    6288 Proceedings of the 4th Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
    6289 2016.
    6290 doi:10.1145/2955193.2955194.
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     6691, &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot
     6692First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
     66932012.
     6694
     6695</li>
     6696<br>
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     6699<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    66066700, &quot;Operational System Testing for Designed in Security.&quot
    66076701Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     
    66206714<br>
    66216715
    6622 <li>
    6623 <b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    6624 , &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot
    6625 First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
    6626 2012.
    6627 
    6628 </li>
    6629 <br>
    6630 
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    66326717
     
    70837168
    70847169<li>
     7170<b>Shamim, Sumaira and Fei, Zongming</b>
     7171, &quot;Evaluating a QoS aware path selection service using the GENI network.&quot
     71722016 IEEE International Conference on Ubiquitous Wireless Broadband (ICUWB), Nanjing, China, IEEE,
     71732016.
     7174doi:10.1109/icuwb.2016.7790581.
     7175</li>
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    70857181<b>Sharma, Navin and Gummeson, Jeremy and Irwin, David and Shenoy, Prashant</b>
    70867182, &quot;Cloudy Computing: Leveraging Weather Forecasts in Energy Harvesting Sensor Systems.&quot
     
    74807576<li>
    74817577<b>Van Vorst, N. and Erazo, M. and Liu, J.</b>
     7578, &quot;PrimoGENI for hybrid network simulation and emulation experiments in GENI.&quot
     7579Journal of Simulation,
     75802012.
     7581doi:10.1057/jos.2012.5.
     7582</li>
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     7586<b>Van Vorst, N. and Erazo, M. and Liu, J.</b>
    74827587, &quot;PrimoGENI: Integrating Real-Time Network Simulation and Emulation in GENI.&quot
    74837588Principles of Advanced and Distributed Simulation (PADS), 2011 IEEE Workshop on, Nice, France, IEEE,
    748475892011.
    74857590doi:10.1109/pads.2011.5936747.
    7486 </li>
    7487 <br>
    7488 
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    7490 <b>Van Vorst, N. and Erazo, M. and Liu, J.</b>
    7491 , &quot;PrimoGENI for hybrid network simulation and emulation experiments in GENI.&quot
    7492 Journal of Simulation,
    7493 2012.
    7494 doi:10.1057/jos.2012.5.
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    74967592<br>