Changes between Version 43 and Version 44 of GENIBibliography


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Timestamp:
09/07/16 18:07:56 (3 years ago)
Author:
Mark Berman
Comment:

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  • GENIBibliography

    v43 v44  
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    241241<li>
     242<b>Baldin, Ilya and Chase, Jeff and Xin, Yufeng and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul and Castillo, Claris and Orlikowski, Victor and Heermann, Chris and Mills, Jonathan</b>
     243, &quot;ExoGENI: A Multi-Domain Infrastructure-as-a-Service Testbed.&quot;
     244The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     2452016.
     246doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;13.
     247<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;13">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;13</a>
     248<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>This chapter describes ExoGENI, a multi-domain testbed infrastructure built using the ORCA control framework. ExoGENI links GENI to two advances in virtual infrastructure (IaaS) services outside of GENI: open cloud computing (OpenStack) and dynamic circuit fabrics. It orchestrates a federation of independent cloud sites and circuit providers through their native IaaS interfaces, and links them to other GENI tools and resources. ExoGENI slivers are instances of basic IaaS resources: variously sized virtual machines, bare-metal nodes, iSCSI block storage volumes, and Layer 2 network links with optional OpenFlow control. ExoGENI offers a powerful unified hosting platform for deeply networked, multi-domain, multi-site cloud applications. ExoGENI operates its own stitching engine and Layer 2 (L2) network exchanges that work in concert to interconnect the sites with dynamic point-to-point and multi-point L2 links via multiple circuit providers. It also supports stitchports—named attachment points enabling direct L2 connections to resources outside the system's control. ExoGENI is seeding a larger, evolving platform linking third-party cloud sites, transport networks, new resource types, and other infrastructure services. It facilitates real-world deployment of innovative distributed services, leading to a new vision of a future federated, more resilient, and deeply networked cyber- infrastructure. This chapter explores the unique features of ExoGENI and, in particular, how it differs from other GENI testbeds.
     249</li>
     250<br>
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     254<li>
    242255<b>Baldine, I.</b>
    243256, &quot;Unique optical networking facilities and cross-layer networking.&quot;
     
    318331
    319332<li>
     333<b>Bastin, Nicholas and McGeer, Rick</b>
     334, &quot;Programmable, Controllable Networks.&quot;
     335The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     3362016.
     337doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;8.
     338<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;8">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;8</a>
     339<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>We describe OpenFlow, a first step on the road to networks which are fully integrated into the IT infrastructure ecosystem. We review the history of OpenFlow, its precursors, its design and initial implementations. We discuss its use within the GENI project and the applications and services developers have built on the OpenFlow platform. Finally, we review the implementation issues with OpenFlow, and consider extensions and the next generation of Software-Defined Networking.
     340</li>
     341<br>
     342
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     345<li>
    320346<b>Bavier, Andy and Chen, Jim and Mambretti, Joe and McGeer, Rick and McGeer, Sean and Nelson, Jude and O'Connell, Patrick and Ricart, Glenn and Tredger, Stephen and Coady, Yvonne</b>
    321347, &quot;The GENI experiment engine.&quot;
     
    338364<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2378975.2378980">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2378975.2378980</a>
    339365<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we argue that federation of cloud systems requires a standard API for users to create, manage, and destroy virtual objects, and a standard naming scheme for virtual objects. We introduce an existing API for this purpose, the Slice-Based Federation Architecture, and demonstrate that it can be implemented on a number of existing cloud management systems. We introduce a simple naming scheme for virtual objects, and discuss its implementation.
     366</li>
     367<br>
     368
     369
     370
     371<li>
     372<b>Bavier, Andy and McGeer, Rick</b>
     373, &quot;The GENI Experiment Engine.&quot;
     374The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     3752016.
     376doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;11.
     377<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;11">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;11</a>
     378<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The GENI Experiment Engine (GEE) is a lightweight, easy-to-use Platform-as-a-Service on GENI inspired by PlanetLab. The GEE offers one-click creation of slicelets (sets of lightweight containers), single-pane-of-glass orchestration and configuration of slice execution, an integrated intra-slice messaging system, and will soon offer a wide-area file system, and an integrated reverse proxy mechanism. A key design goal of the GEE was simplicity: it should be possible for a new user to get up-and-running with GEE in less than 5 min. The GEE is constructed as an overlay on GENI resources and is available to all GENI users.
    340379</li>
    341380<br>
     
    552591
    553592<li>
     593<b>Brinn, Marshall</b>
     594, &quot;GENI Architecture Foundation.&quot;
     595The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     5962016.
     597doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;5.
     598<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;5">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;5</a>
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     605<li>
    554606<b>Brinn, Marshall and Bastin, NIcholas and Bavier, Andrew and Berman, Mark and Chase, Jeffrey and Ricci, Robert</b>
    555607, &quot;Trust as the Foundation of Resource Exchange in GENI.&quot;
     
    708760
    709761<li>
     762<b>Chase, Jeff and Baldin, Ilya</b>
     763, &quot;A Retrospective on ORCA: Open Resource Control Architecture.&quot;
     764The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     7652016.
     766doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;7.
     767<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;7">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;7</a>
     768<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>ORCA is an extensible platform for building infrastructure servers based on a foundational leasing abstraction. These servers include Aggregate Managers for diverse resource providers and stateful controllers for dynamic slices. ORCA also defines a brokering architecture and control framework to link these servers together into a federated multi-domain deployment. This chapter reviews the architectural principles of ORCA and outlines how they enabled and influenced the design of the ExoGENI Racks deployment, which is built on the ORCA platform. It also sets ORCA in context with the GENI architecture as it has evolved.
     769</li>
     770<br>
     771
     772
     773
     774<li>
     775<b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
     776, &quot;Cont2: Social-Aware Content and Contact Based File Search in Delay Tolerant Networks.&quot;
     777Proceedings of the 2013 42Nd International Conference on Parallel Processing, IEEE Computer Society, Washington, DC, USA,
     7782013.
     779doi:10.1109/icpp.2013.28.
     780<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icpp.2013.28">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icpp.2013.28</a>
     781<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we focus on distributed file search over a delay tolerant network (DTN) formed by mobile devices that exhibit the characteristics of social networks. Current file search methods in MANETs/DTNs are either content-based or contact-based. The former builds routing tables for node contents but is not resilient to high node mobility, while the latter exploits node contact patterns in the social networks but may lead to high latency. Recent research also reveal the importance of interests in realizing efficient file dissemination in DTNs. In this paper, we first analyze node interest and mobility from real traces, which confirms the shortcomings of a contact based method and show the importance of considering both content/interest and contact in file search. We then propose Cont2, a social-aware file search method which leverages both node social interests (content) and contact patterns to enhance search efficiency. First, considering people with common interests tend to share files and gather together, Cont2 virtually groups common-interest nodes into a community to direct file search. Second, considering human mobility follows a certain pattern, Cont2 exploits nodes that have high contact frequency with the queried content. Third, Cont2 also exploits active nodes that have more connections to others as a complementary approach to expedite file search. Trace-driven experimental on the real-world GENI test bed and NS-2 simulator show that Cont2 can significantly improve the search efficiency compared to current methods.
     782</li>
     783<br>
     784
     785<li>
    710786<b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
    711787, &quot;Global optimization of file availability through replication for efficient file sharing in MANETs.&quot;
     
    718794<br>
    719795
    720 <li>
    721 <b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
    722 , &quot;Cont2: Social-Aware Content and Contact Based File Search in Delay Tolerant Networks.&quot;
    723 Proceedings of the 2013 42Nd International Conference on Parallel Processing, IEEE Computer Society, Washington, DC, USA,
    724 2013.
    725 doi:10.1109/icpp.2013.28.
    726 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icpp.2013.28">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icpp.2013.28</a>
    727 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we focus on distributed file search over a delay tolerant network (DTN) formed by mobile devices that exhibit the characteristics of social networks. Current file search methods in MANETs/DTNs are either content-based or contact-based. The former builds routing tables for node contents but is not resilient to high node mobility, while the latter exploits node contact patterns in the social networks but may lead to high latency. Recent research also reveal the importance of interests in realizing efficient file dissemination in DTNs. In this paper, we first analyze node interest and mobility from real traces, which confirms the shortcomings of a contact based method and show the importance of considering both content/interest and contact in file search. We then propose Cont2, a social-aware file search method which leverages both node social interests (content) and contact patterns to enhance search efficiency. First, considering people with common interests tend to share files and gather together, Cont2 virtually groups common-interest nodes into a community to direct file search. Second, considering human mobility follows a certain pattern, Cont2 exploits nodes that have high contact frequency with the queried content. Third, Cont2 also exploits active nodes that have more connections to others as a complementary approach to expedite file search. Trace-driven experimental on the real-world GENI test bed and NS-2 simulator show that Cont2 can significantly improve the search efficiency compared to current methods.
    728 </li>
    729 <br>
    730 
    731796
    732797
     
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    759824<li>
     825<b>Chen, Shuoshuo and Ji, Xiang and Veeraraghavan, Malathi and Emmerson, Steve and Slezak, Joseph and Decker, Steven G.</b>
     826, &quot;A Cross-Layer Multicast-Push Unicast-Pull (MPUP) Architecture for Reliable File-Stream Distribution.&quot;
     8272016 IEEE 40th Annual Computer Software and Applications Conference (COMPSAC), Atlanta, GA, USA, IEEE,
     8282016.
     829doi:10.1109/compsac.2016.28.
     830<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/compsac.2016.28">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/compsac.2016.28</a>
     831<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The growing deployment of OpenFlow/SDN networks makes it increasingly possible to leverage network multicast services. This work proposes a novel cross-layer Multicast-Push Unicast Pull (MPUP) architecture that includes functionality in the application, transport and link layers to offer users a reliable file-stream distribution service to multiple subscribers. A prototype implementation of the MPUP architecture was realized in a new version of Local Data Manager (LDM), LDM7, a software program that has been in use since 1994 for real-time meteorology data distribution. LDM6, the currently deployed version, uses application-layer multicast. Experiments were run on the GENI infrastructure to compare LDM7 and LDM6. The two main findings are (i) LDM7 can be run at a higher sending rate than LDM6 allowing for improved performance (lower file delivery latency), and (ii) to achieve the same performance, LDM7 uses significantly lower bandwidth and compute capacity. A three-fold improvement in performance improvement was possible with LDM7, and a bandwidth reduction from 350 Mbps to 21.4 Mbps was observed with 24 receivers.
     832</li>
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     837<li>
    760838<b>Chen, X. and Cai, H. and Wolf, T.</b>
    761839, &quot;Multi-criteria Routing in Networks with Path Choices.&quot;
     
    897975
    898976<li>
     977<b>Dempsey, HeidiPicher</b>
     978, &quot;The GENI Mesoscale Network.&quot;
     979The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     9802016.
     981doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;12.
     982<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;12">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;12</a>
     983<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>GENI is a national network of computation, storage, and networking resources interconnected by a deeply programmable nationwide infrastructure. The GENI mesoscale infrastructure was not built from scratch in a green-field design, but was a truly cooperative design, integration and operations effort. The challenge confronting the design and development team was to combine existing capabilities to virtualize individual resources across resource types to create an environment that supports smoothly interoperating ” slices” of the shared GENI infrastructure.
     984</li>
     985<br>
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     989<li>
    899990<b>Deng, Juan and Brooks, Richard R. and Martin, James</b>
    900991, &quot;Assessing the Effect of WiMAX System Parameter Settings on MAC-level Local DoS Vulnerability.&quot;
     
    10661157
    10671158<li>
     1159<b>Faber, Ted and Schwab, Stephen and Wroclawski, John</b>
     1160, &quot;Authorization and Access Control: ABAC.&quot;
     1161The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     11622016.
     1163doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;10.
     1164<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;10">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;10</a>
     1165<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>GENI's goal of wide-scale collaboration on infrastructure owned by independent and diverse stakeholders stresses current access control systems to the breaking point. Challenges not well addressed by current systems include, at minimum, support for distributed identity and policy management, correctness and auditability, and approachability. The Attribute Based Access Control (ABAC) system is an attribute-based authorization system that combines attributes using a simple reasoning system to provide authorization that (1) expresses delegation and other authorization models efficiently and scalably; (2) provides auditing information that includes both the decision and reasoning; and (3) supports multiple authentication frameworks as entry points into the attribute space. The GENI project has taken this powerful theoretical system and matured it into a form ready for practical use.
     1166</li>
     1167<br>
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     1171<li>
    10681172<b>Feamster, Nick and Gao, Lixin and Rexford, Jennifer</b>
    10691173, &quot;How to lease the internet in your spare time.&quot;
     
    11311235
    11321236<li>
     1237<b>Freeman, PeterA</b>
     1238, &quot;The GENI Vision: Origins, Early History, Possible Futures.&quot;
     1239The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     12402016.
     1241doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;1.
     1242<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;1">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;1</a>
     1243<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>This paper presents the vision of GENI as first formulated at the National Science Foundation (NSF) in early 2004 and expanded during 2004–2007, identifies what forces shaped the basic idea during its formation, and comments on where it may go in the future. The paper describes motivations, concepts, and history—not technical details—that were in play between 2004 and 2007 as the GENI Project was being formulated and launched, and that continue today. Understanding the original vision and goals, basic ideas, and motivations of the GENI Project; the context in which it emerged; and the forces that shaped the Project will enable you to understand better the technical details and changes that occur in the future. I end with some comments about possible futures for GENI.
     1244</li>
     1245<br>
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     1249<li>
    11331250<b>Fund, Fraida and Dong, Chen and Korakis, Thanasis and Panwar, Shivendra</b>
    11341251, &quot;A Framework for Multidimensional Measurements on an Experimental WiMAX Testbed.&quot;
     
    12981415
    12991416<li>
     1417<b>Griffioen, James and Fei, Zongming and Nasir, Hussamuddin and Carpenter, Charles and Reed, Jeremy and Wu, Xiongqi and Rivera</b>
     1418, &quot;The GENI Desktop.&quot;
     1419The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     14202016.
     1421doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;16.
     1422<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;16">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;16</a>
     1423<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The GENI Desktop supports users through the entire lifecycle of an experiment, including creating and setting up an experiment, running and interacting with the experiment, monitoring the experiment and collecting performance data, archiving the results and tearing down the experiment. It provides a single simple web-based graphical interface to access these functions. In addition, it also provides a command line interface for expert users to write scripts to control the whole process of their experiments. This chapter describes the design goals and features of the GENI Desktop. It also demonstrates usage examples showing how the GENI Desktop can help users with their experiments.
     1424</li>
     1425<br>
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     1429<li>
    13001430<b>Griffioen, James and Fei, Zongming and Nasir, Hussamuddin and Wu, Xiongqi and Reed, Jeremy and Carpenter, Charles</b>
    13011431, &quot;Measuring experiments in GENI.&quot;
     
    13631493
    13641494<li>
     1495<b>Hemmings, Matt and Krahn, Robert and Lary, David and McGeer, Rick and Ricart, Glenn and R&#x6f;&#x0308;der, Marko</b>
     1496, &quot;The Ignite Distributed Collaborative Scientific Visualization System.&quot;
     1497The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     14982016.
     1499doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;19.
     1500<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;19">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;19</a>
     1501<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>We describe the Ignite Distributed Collaborative Visualization System (IDCVS), a system which permits real-time interaction and visual collaboration around large data sets on thin devices for users distributed about the wide area. The IDCVS provides seamless interaction and immediate updates even under heavy load and when users are widely separated: the design goal was to fetch a 1 MB data set from a server and render it within 150 ms, for a user anywhere in the world, and reflect changes made by a user in one location to all other users within the bound given by inter-user network latency. Scientific collaboration and interaction is the initial use case for the IDCVS, since eScience is characterized by large data sets. The visualizer can be used for any application where the data can be visualized on a web page. The visualizer consists of many replicated components, distributed across the wide area, so that an instance of the visualizer is close to any user: the design goal is to place an instance of the visualizer with an 20-ms latency of any user. It is the first exemplar of a new class of application enabled by the Distributed Cloud: real-time interaction with large data sets on arbitrarily thin devices, anywhere. The IDCVS features modular design, so it functions as a specialized Platform-as-a-Service: writing a new collaborative visualization application is as simple as designing a web page and distributing a data server. The system was demonstrated successfully on a significant worldwide air pollution data set, with values on 10, 25, 50, and 100 km worldwide grids, monthly over an 18-year period. It was demonstrated on a wide variety of clients, including laptop, tablet, and smartphone. The system itself has been deployed at over 20 sites worldwide. Distribution and deployment across
     1502</li>
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     1507<li>
    13651508<b>Herron, Jon-Paul</b>
    13661509, &quot;GENI Meta-Operations Center.&quot;
     
    16871830<li>
    16881831<b>Krishnappa, Dilip K. and Lyons, Eric and Irwin, David and Zink, Michael</b>
    1689 , &quot;Performance of GENI Cloud Testbeds for Real Time Scientific Application.&quot;
    1690 First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
    1691 2012.
    1692 
    1693 
    1694 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Dedicating high end servers for short-term execution of scientific applications such as weather forecasting wastes resources. Cloud platforms IaaS model seems well suited for applications which are executed on an irregular basis and for short duration. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of research testbed cloud platforms such as GENICloud and ORCA cloud clusters for our real-time scientific application of short-term weather forecasting called Nowcasting. In this paper, we evaluate the network capabilities of these research cloud testbeds for our real-time application of weather forecasting. In addition, we evaluate the computation time of executing Nowcasting on each cloud platform for weather data collected from real weather events. We also evaluate the total time taken to generate and transmit short-term forecast images to end users with live data from our own radar on campus. We also compare the performance of each of these clusters for Nowcasting with commercial cloud services such as Amazon's EC2. The results obtained from our measurement show that cloud testbeds are suitable for real-time application experiments to be carried out on a cloud platform.
    1695 </li>
    1696 <br>
    1697 
    1698 <li>
    1699 <b>Krishnappa, Dilip K. and Lyons, Eric and Irwin, David and Zink, Michael</b>
    17001832, &quot;Network capabilities of cloud services for a real time scientific application.&quot;
    1701183337th Annual IEEE Conference on Local Computer Networks, Clearwater Beach, FL, USA, IEEE,
     
    17041836<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/lcn.2012.6423665">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/lcn.2012.6423665</a>
    17051837<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Dedicating high-end servers for executing scientific applications that run intermittently, such as severe weather detection or generalized weather forecasting, wastes resources. While the Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) model used by today's cloud platforms is well-suited for the bursty computational demands of these applications, it is unclear if the network capabilities of today's cloud platforms are sufficient. In this paper, we analyze the networking capabilities of multiple commercial (Amazon's EC2 and Rackspace) and research (GENICloud and ExoGENI cloud) platforms in the context of a Nowcasting application, a forecasting algorithm for highly accurate, near-term, e.g., 5-20 minutes, weather predictions. The application has both computational and network requirements. While it executes rarely, whenever severe weather approaches, it benefits from an IaaS model; However, since its results are time-critical, enough bandwidth must be available to transmit radar data to cloud platforms before it becomes stale. We conduct network capacity measurements between radar sites and cloud platforms throughout the country. Our results indicate that ExoGENI cloud performs the best for both serial and parallel data transfer with an average throughput of 110.22 Mbps and 17.2 Mbps, respectively. We also found that the cloud services perform better in the distributed data transfer case, where a subset of nodes transmit data in parallel to a cloud instance. Ultimately, we conclude that commercial and research clouds are capable of providing sufficient bandwidth for our real-time Nowcasting application.
     1838</li>
     1839<br>
     1840
     1841<li>
     1842<b>Krishnappa, Dilip K. and Lyons, Eric and Irwin, David and Zink, Michael</b>
     1843, &quot;Performance of GENI Cloud Testbeds for Real Time Scientific Application.&quot;
     1844First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
     18452012.
     1846
     1847
     1848<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Dedicating high end servers for short-term execution of scientific applications such as weather forecasting wastes resources. Cloud platforms IaaS model seems well suited for applications which are executed on an irregular basis and for short duration. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of research testbed cloud platforms such as GENICloud and ORCA cloud clusters for our real-time scientific application of short-term weather forecasting called Nowcasting. In this paper, we evaluate the network capabilities of these research cloud testbeds for our real-time application of weather forecasting. In addition, we evaluate the computation time of executing Nowcasting on each cloud platform for weather data collected from real weather events. We also evaluate the total time taken to generate and transmit short-term forecast images to end users with live data from our own radar on campus. We also compare the performance of each of these clusters for Nowcasting with commercial cloud services such as Amazon's EC2. The results obtained from our measurement show that cloud testbeds are suitable for real-time application experiments to be carried out on a cloud platform.
    17061849</li>
    17071850<br>
     
    18141957
    18151958<li>
     1959<b>Leon-Garcia, Alberto and Bannazadeh, Hadi</b>
     1960, &quot;SAVI Testbed for Applications on Software-Defined Infrastructure.&quot;
     1961The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     19622016.
     1963doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;22.
     1964<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;22">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;22</a>
     1965<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this chapter we introduce the Canadian project ” Smart Applications on Virtual Infrastructures” that explores the design of future application platforms. First we present our original vision of a future application and content marketplace and specify requirements for application platforms. We identify multi-tier clouds that include a ” Smart Edge” as essential to supporting low-latency and high- bandwidth applications. We describe a design for the Smart Edge that uses an integrated management system that virtualizes converged heterogeneous computing and networking resources and uses service orientation to provide software-defined infrastructure and platform services. Our implementation of Smart Edge clusters is presented and the deployment of these in a national testbed is described. The Janus integrated management system is introduced and we explain how it builds on OpenStack and Open Flow. We describe experiments and applications that are being conducted on the SAVI testbed. We then describe the federation of the SAVI testbed with GENI and we conclude with our plans for using the SAVI testbed as a foundation for smart city platforms.
     1966</li>
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     1971<li>
    18161972<b>Li, Dawei and Hong, Xiaoyan</b>
    18171973, &quot;Practical exploitation on system vulnerability of ProtoGENI.&quot;
     
    19572113
    19582114<li>
     2115<b>M&#x75;&#x0308;eller, Paul and Fischer, Stefan</b>
     2116, &quot;Europe's Mission in Next-Generation Networking with Special Emphasis on the German-Lab Project.&quot;
     2117The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     21182016.
     2119doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;21.
     2120<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;21">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;21</a>
     2121<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this contribution we give a rough overview of the European and particularly the German approaches to next generation networking, or more specifically Future-Internet Research and Experimentation. We can identify three different classes of projects in these approaches. The first class is related to basic research that is covered by projects within Objective 1.1 (Future Networks) of Framework Program 7 (FP7) of the European Commission (EC). This can be compared to the Future-Internet Architecture (FIA) projects of the National Science Foundation (NSF) in the US. The second class of projects is related to experimentation. The FIRE (Future-Internet Research and Experimentation) projects of the EC can be considered in this context, which are more or less comparable to the GENI approach. The third class is more application-driven and covered by the Public Private Partnership (PPP) projects of the EC. This class of projects can be compared to the USIgnite program. A slightly different approach was taken by the German- Lab (G-Lab) project where basic research projects and experimentation were smoothly intertwined, and also covered application-oriented aspects like mobility, virtualization or security in its second phase. All these projects from the EU, and the G-Lab approach will be described in more detail throughout this contribution, based on typical examples.
     2122</li>
     2123<br>
     2124
     2125
     2126
     2127<li>
    19592128<b>Maccherani, E. and Femminella, M. and Lee, J. W. and Francescangeli, R. and Janak, J. and Reali, G. and Schulzrinne, H.</b>
    19602129, &quot;Extending the NetServ autonomic management capabilities using OpenFlow.&quot;
     
    20342203<li>
    20352204<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     2205, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot;
     2206Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
     22072014.
     2208doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932970.
     2209<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970</a>
     2210<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Networks (SDNs), primarily based on OpenFlow, are being deployed in single domain networks around the world. The popularity of SDNs has given rise to multiple considerations about designing, implementing, and operating Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs), to enable SDNs to interconnect SDN islands and to extend SDNs across multiple domains. These goals can be accomplished only by developing new techniques that extend the single domain orientation of current SDN/OpenFlow approaches to include capabilities for multidomain control, including those for resource discovery, signaling, and dynamic provisioning. Several networking research communities have begun to investigate these concepts. Early architectural models of SDXs have been designed and implemented as prototypes. These SDXs are being used to conduct experiments and to demonstrate the potentials of SDXs.
     2211</li>
     2212<br>
     2213
     2214<li>
     2215<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    20362216, &quot;Next Generation Virtual Network Architecture for Multi-tenant Distributed Clouds: Challenges and Emerging Techniques.&quot;
    20372217Proceedings of the 4th Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     
    20432223<br>
    20442224
    2045 <li>
    2046 <b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    2047 , &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot;
    2048 Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
    2049 2014.
    2050 doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932970.
    2051 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970</a>
    2052 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Networks (SDNs), primarily based on OpenFlow, are being deployed in single domain networks around the world. The popularity of SDNs has given rise to multiple considerations about designing, implementing, and operating Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs), to enable SDNs to interconnect SDN islands and to extend SDNs across multiple domains. These goals can be accomplished only by developing new techniques that extend the single domain orientation of current SDN/OpenFlow approaches to include capabilities for multidomain control, including those for resource discovery, signaling, and dynamic provisioning. Several networking research communities have begun to investigate these concepts. Early architectural models of SDXs have been designed and implemented as prototypes. These SDXs are being used to conduct experiments and to demonstrate the potentials of SDXs.
     2225
     2226
     2227<li>
     2228<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei and Ge, Jingguo and You, Junling and Li, Tong and de Laat, Cees and Grosso, Paola and Liu, Te-Lung and Luo, Mon-Yen and Nakao, Aki and M&#x75;&#x0308;ller, Paul and van der Pol, Ronald and Reed, Martin and Stanton, Michael and Yang, Chu-Sing</b>
     2229, &quot;Creating a Worldwide Network for the Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) and Related Experimental Environments.&quot;
     2230The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     22312016.
     2232doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;24.
     2233<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;24">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;24</a>
     2234<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Many important societal activities are global in scope, and as these activities continually expand world-wide, they are increasingly based on a foundation of advanced communication services and underlying innovative network architecture, technology, and core infrastructure. To continue progress in these areas, research activities cannot be limited to campus labs and small local testbeds or even to national testbeds. Researchers must be able to explore concepts at scale— to conduct experiments on world-wide testbeds that approximate the attributes of the real world. Today, it is possible to take advantage of several macro information technology trends, especially virtualization and capabilities for programming technology resources at a highly granulated level, to design, implement and operate network research environments at a global scale. GENI is developing such an environment, as are research communities in a number of other countries. Recently, these communities have not only been investigating techniques for federating these research environments across multiple domains, but they have also been demonstration prototypes of such federations. This chapter provides an overview of key topics and experimental activities related to GENI international networking and to related projects throughout the world.
    20532235</li>
    20542236<br>
     
    21682350
    21692351<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Location aware applications can benefit from a more accurate yet robust IP geolocation framework. Various approaches to IP geolocation have been well documented. The most recent approach casts IP geolocation as a machine learn- ing classification problem. This approach makes it possible to incorporate both delay and non delay based information. The accuracy of IP geolocation can be improved by incorporating additional types of geolocation information rather relying on network delay alone. To enhance the classification accuracy of the existing classification framework, we expand it to include 6 features (3 of which are novel). We use PlanetLab as a testbed to generate our measurement set. We select 67 PlanetLab nodes within the United States with known geographic location as our landmarks. We test the accuracy of our framework on 23,843 routers given ping measurements from the 67 landmarks. With only three features (average delay, average hops and population density) tested, our new classifier gives a reduced average error distance of 157.81 miles and a median error distance of 0 miles, compared to the present classifier that gives an average error distance of 253.34 miles. This is very promising as we move on to the next phase of incorporating data for the remaining 5 features. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first proposed framework that aims to improve the accuracy of the present classifier based IP geolocation.
     2352</li>
     2353<br>
     2354
     2355
     2356
     2357<li>
     2358<b>McGeer, Rick and Ricci, Robert</b>
     2359, &quot;The InstaGENI Project.&quot;
     2360The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     23612016.
     2362doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;14.
     2363<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;14">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;14</a>
     2364<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this chapter we describe InstaGENI, built in response to the GENI Mesoscale initiative (Berman et al., Comput Netw 61:5–23, 2014). InstaGENI was designed both as a distributed cloud, to permit experimenters to run distributed systems and networking experiments, across the wide area, and as a meta-cloud, to permit systems researchers to build experimental clouds within the underlying InstaGENI cloud. InstaGENI consists of more than 36 sites spread across the GENI infrastructure, interconnected by a nationwide, deeply-programmable layer- 2 network. Each site is capable of functioning as an autonomous, standalone cloud, with builtin HaaS, IaaS, and OpenFlow (The Openflow Switch Specification. http://OpenFlowSwitch.org; McKeown et al., ACM SIGCOMM CCR 38(2):69– 74, 2008) native support. Sites are also and by default linked, to offer slices across the entire GENI Mesoscale infrastructure. InstaGENI targeted and has realized its key design goals of expandability, reliability, resistance to partition, ease of maintenance upgrade, high distribution, and affordability. InstaGENI offers a highly-scalable infrastructure with OpenFlow native both between and across sites. It has demonstrated a high degree of autonomy and remote management, and has demonstrated its meta-cloud properties by hosting an IaaS and PaaS service within it, GENI PlanetLab and the GENI Experiment Engine (Bavier et al., The GENI experiment engine. In: Proceedings of Tridentcom, 2015).
    21702365</li>
    21712366<br>
     
    22522447
    22532448<li>
     2449<b>Nakao, Akihiro and Yamada, Kazuhisa</b>
     2450, &quot;Research and Development on Network Virtualization Technologies in Japan: VNode and FLARE Projects.&quot;
     2451The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     24522016.
     2453doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;23.
     2454<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;23">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;23</a>
     2455
     2456</li>
     2457<br>
     2458
     2459
     2460
     2461<li>
    22542462<b>Nakauchi, Kiyohide and Nishinaga, Nozomu</b>
    22552463, &quot;Software-defined exchange for the virtualized WiFi network towards future Mobile Cloud services.&quot;
     
    23542562
    23552563
     2564
     2565<li>
     2566<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
     2567, &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot;
     2568First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
     25692012.
     2570
     2571
     2572<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks are major security threats to the Internet. The distributed structure of these attacks makes it difficult to distinguish between legitimate and attack traffic, making detection difficult. In addition to this challenge, researchers also have to study and find countermeasures against these attacks without using an operational network for testing, since attacks on operational networks inconvenience users. In this paper, we propose a method to perform DDoS analysis on real hardware using real traffic without jeopardizing the original network. We implement our experiments on the Geni testbed using Openflow. We present results from DDoS detection methods using operational traffic.
     2573</li>
     2574<br>
     2575
     2576<li>
     2577<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
     2578, &quot;Operational System Testing for Designed in Security.&quot;
     2579Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     25802013.
     2581doi:10.1145/2459976.2460038.
     2582<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2459976.2460038">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2459976.2460038</a>
     2583<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>To design secure systems, one needs to understand how attackers use system vulnerabilities in their favor. This requires testing vulnerabilities on operational systems. However, working on operational systems is not always possible because of the risk of disturbance. In this study, we introduce an approach to experimenting using operational system data and performing real attacks without disturbing the original system. We applied this approach to a network security experiment and tested the performance of three detection methods. The approach used in this study can be used when developing systems with Designed-in Security to identify and test system vulnerabilities.
     2584</li>
     2585<br>
    23562586
    23572587<li>
     
    23662596<br>
    23672597
    2368 <li>
    2369 <b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    2370 , &quot;Operational System Testing for Designed in Security.&quot;
    2371 Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
    2372 2013.
    2373 doi:10.1145/2459976.2460038.
    2374 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2459976.2460038">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2459976.2460038</a>
    2375 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>To design secure systems, one needs to understand how attackers use system vulnerabilities in their favor. This requires testing vulnerabilities on operational systems. However, working on operational systems is not always possible because of the risk of disturbance. In this study, we introduce an approach to experimenting using operational system data and performing real attacks without disturbing the original system. We applied this approach to a network security experiment and tested the performance of three detection methods. The approach used in this study can be used when developing systems with Designed-in Security to identify and test system vulnerabilities.
    2376 </li>
    2377 <br>
    2378 
    2379 <li>
    2380 <b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    2381 , &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot;
    2382 First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
    2383 2012.
    2384 
    2385 
    2386 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks are major security threats to the Internet. The distributed structure of these attacks makes it difficult to distinguish between legitimate and attack traffic, making detection difficult. In addition to this challenge, researchers also have to study and find countermeasures against these attacks without using an operational network for testing, since attacks on operational networks inconvenience users. In this paper, we propose a method to perform DDoS analysis on real hardware using real traffic without jeopardizing the original network. We implement our experiments on the Geni testbed using Openflow. We present results from DDoS detection methods using operational traffic.
    2387 </li>
    2388 <br>
    2389 
    23902598
    23912599
     
    24952703
    24962704<li>
     2705<b>Rakotoarivelo, Thierry and Jourjon, Guillaume and Mehani, Olivier and Ott, Max and Zink, Michael</b>
     2706, &quot;A Walk Through the GENI Experiment Cycle.&quot;
     2707The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     27082016.
     2709doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;17.
     2710<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;17">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;17</a>
     2711<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The ability to repeat experiments from a research study and obtain similar results is a corner stone in experiment-based scientific discovery. This essential feature has often been overlooked by the distributed computing and networking community. There are many reasons for that, such as the complexity of provisioning, configuring, and orchestrating the resources used by experiments, their multiple external dependencies, or the difficulty to seamlessly record these dependencies. This chapter describes a methodology based on well-established principles to plan, prepare and execute reproducible experiments. We propose and describe a family of tools, the LabWiki workspace, to support an experimenter's workflow based on that methodology. This proposed workspace provides services and mechanisms for each step of an experiment-based study, while automatically capturing the necessary information to allow others to repeat, inspect, validate and modify prior experiments. Our LabWiki workspace builds on existing contributions, de-facto protocols, and model standards, which emerged from recent experimental facility initiatives. We use a real experiment as a thread to guide and illustrate the discussion throughout this chapter.
     2712</li>
     2713<br>
     2714
     2715
     2716
     2717<li>
    24972718<b>Rakotoarivelo, Thierry and Jourjon, Guillaume and Mehani, Olivier and Ott, Maximilian and Zink, Mike</b>
    24982719, &quot;Repeatable Experiments with LabWiki.&quot;
     
    25732794
    25742795<li>
     2796<b>Raychaudhuri, Dipankar and Seskar, Ivan and Ott, Max</b>
     2797, &quot;ORBIT: Wireless Experimentation.&quot;
     2798The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     27992016.
     2800doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;4.
     2801<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;4">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;4</a>
     2802<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>This chapter presents an overview of the ORBIT testbed for wireless experimentation. ORBIT is an NSF supported community testbed for wireless networking which provides a variety of programmable resources for at-scale reproducible experimentation as well as real-world outdoor trials. The centerpiece of the ORBIT testbed is the 400-node ” radio grid” deployed at the Rutgers Tech Centre facility in North Brunswick, NJ. The radio grid enables researchers to conduct reproducible experiments with large numbers of wireless nodes over a wide range of radio technologies, densities and network topologies. The ORBIT system architecture is outlined and technical details are given for the radio grid's key hardware and software components including the radio node platforms, software defined radios, RF measurement system, switching and computing backend and the ORBIT management framework (OMF). Additional ORBIT resources including special purpose sandboxes and the outdoor WiMax campus deployment are also described. The experimental interface and scripting tools for running an experiment on ORBIT are outlined, and examples of a few representative experiments which have been run on the ORBIT testbed are summarized. The chapter concludes with a view of ORBIT's evolution and future upgrade path along with an explanation of how it links to the overall GENI project.
     2803</li>
     2804<br>
     2805
     2806
     2807
     2808<li>
    25752809<b>Ricart, Glenn</b>
    25762810, &quot;US Ignite testbeds: Advanced testbeds enable next-generation applications.&quot;
     
    25862820
    25872821<li>
     2822<b>Ricart, Glenn and McGeer, Rick</b>
     2823, &quot;US Ignite and Smarter Communities.&quot;
     2824The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     28252016.
     2826doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;20.
     2827<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;20">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;20</a>
     2828<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>What will the next generation of the Internet do? How will it change healthcare, education, public safety, clean energy, transportation, and advanced manufacturing? These are the questions that launched US Ignite. Computer Science research led by the National Science Foundation, DARPA, and corporate R&#x0026;D labs have led to powerful new concepts. The NSF programs FIND (Future Internet Design), GENI (Global Environment for Network Innova- tion), and FIA (Future Internet Architectures) have led to a number of advanced networking concepts that could be transformational. US Ignite invites a wide range of application developers an opportunity to play with these new ideas to see what kinds of applications they make possible. US Ignite also aims to make trial deployments of these applications in testbed communities possessing the necessary advanced infrastructure, and to encourage more communities to deploy the necessary advanced infrastructure.
     2829</li>
     2830<br>
     2831
     2832
     2833
     2834<li>
     2835<b>Ricci, Robert</b>
     2836, &quot;The Need for Flexible Community Research Infrastructure.&quot;
     2837The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     28382016.
     2839doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;6.
     2840<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;6">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;6</a>
     2841<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Many areas of computing research have strong empirical components, and thus require testbeds, test networks, compute facilities, clouds, and other infrastructure for running experiments. The most successful facilities of these types are those built by the communities that need them: domain experts are in the best position to ensure that infrastructure they design meet the needs of their communities. The observation that we make in this chapter is that the hardware, and in many cases, software, infrastructure needs that underlie many of these facilities are remarkably similar. This points out the opportunity to build infrastructure that supports a wide range of computing research domains in an easy to use, cost effective, and low-risk manner. This chapter describes our vision for the future of computing research infrastructure.
     2842</li>
     2843<br>
     2844
     2845
     2846
     2847<li>
    25882848<b>Ricci, Robert and Eide, Eric</b>
    25892849, &quot;Introducing CloudLab:Scientific Infrastructure for Advancing Cloud Architecturesand Applications.&quot;
     
    25992859
    26002860<li>
     2861<b>Ricci, Robert and Team, The Emulab</b>
     2862, &quot;Precursors: Emulab.&quot;
     2863The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     28642016.
     2865doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;2.
     2866<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;2">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;2</a>
     2867<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>One of the precursors of the GENI project is Emulab, a testbed effort that has been ongoing at the University of Utah since 1999. Emulab is both the name of a testbed control system, and the name of a particular facility built using that system. The Emulab facility is housed at the University of Utah, but is available to researchers worldwide—thousands of users have run hundreds of thousands of experiments over the lifetime of the testbed. The Emulab software is open-source, and has been used to bring up dozens of experimental facilities at institutions around the world. Some of these, like the Utah facility, are open to the public for the purposes of research and educations; others are run by individual institutions for their own use, which may include product R&#x0026;D, classified work, etc.
     2868</li>
     2869<br>
     2870
     2871
     2872
     2873<li>
    26012874<b>Ricci, Robert and Wong, Gary and Stoller, Leigh and Duerig, Jonathon</b>
    26022875, &quot;An Architecture For International Federation of Network Testbeds.&quot;
     
    26192892<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2723872.2723885">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2723872.2723885</a>
    26202893<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Repeating research in computer science requires more than just code and data: it requires an appropriate environment in which to run experiments. In some cases, this environment appears fairly straightforward: it consists of a particular operating system and set of required libraries. In many cases, however, it is considerably more complex: the execution environment may be an entire network, may involve complex and fragile configuration of the dependencies, or may require large amounts of resources in terms of computation cycles, network bandwidth, or storage. Even the &#x73;&#x0308;traightforward&#x20;&#x0308;case turns out to be surprisingly intricate: there may be explicit or hidden dependencies on compilers, kernel quirks, details of the ISA, etc. The result is that when one tries to repeat published results, creating an environment sufficiently similar to one in which the experiment was originally run can be troublesome; this problem only gets worse as time passes. What the computer science community needs, then, are environments that have the explicit goal of enabling repeatable research. This paper outlines the problem of repeatable research environments, presents a set of requirements for such environments, and describes one facility that attempts to address them.
     2894</li>
     2895<br>
     2896
     2897
     2898
     2899<li>
     2900<b>Riga, Niky and Edwards, Sarah and Thomas, Vicraj</b>
     2901, &quot;The Experimenter's View of GENI.&quot;
     2902The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     29032016.
     2904doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;15.
     2905<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;15">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;15</a>
     2906<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>GENI is a federated infrastructure that provides GENI experimenters with access to multiple different testbeds, enabling networking and distributed systems research. Although GENI resources are owned and operated by different organizations from a users perspective GENI appears as a unified virtual laboratory. An experimenter can instantiate custom Layer 2 topologies that include a variety of compute and network elements. This ability is achieved through the use of tools, as well as common APIs and shared authentication and authorization procedures across the federation.
    26212907</li>
    26222908<br>
     
    28203106
    28213107<li>
     3108<b>Seskar, Ivan and Raychaudhuri, Dipankar and Gosain, Abhimanyu</b>
     3109, &quot;4G Cellular Systems in GENI.&quot;
     3110The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     31112016.
     3112doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;9.
     3113<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;9">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;9</a>
     3114<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Open, programmable networks are an important enabler for the future Internet because of their ability to support flexible experimentation and to evolve function- ality as new network architectures are deployed on a trial basis. The NSF supported GENI initiative is an ongoing effort to build a national scale open programmable network using a combination of open switching, routing and wireless technologies. The main features of open networking devices used in such testbeds are: (a) an open API which provides access to link-layer technology parameters; (b) downloadable programmability of protocols used at the network layer; (c) virtualization of network resources such as routers and base stations in order to enable multiple simultaneous experiments; and (d) observability of key performance measures such as throughput and packet loss.
     3115</li>
     3116<br>
     3117
     3118
     3119
     3120<li>
    28223121<b>Sharma, Navin and Gummeson, Jeremy and Irwin, David and Shenoy, Prashant</b>
    28233122, &quot;Cloudy Computing: Leveraging Weather Forecasts in Energy Harvesting Sensor Systems.&quot;
     
    31063405
    31073406<li>
     3407<b>Thomas, Vicraj and Riga, Niky and Edwards, Sarah and Fund, Fraida and Korakis, Thanasis</b>
     3408, &quot;GENI in the Classroom.&quot;
     3409The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     34102016.
     3411doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;18.
     3412<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;18">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;18</a>
     3413<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>One of the great successes of GENI has been its use as a remote laboratory by instructors of networking, distributed systems and cloud computing classes. It allows instructors to provide hands-on learning experiences on a real, large-scale network. Reasons for this success include GENI's ease of use, access to resources such as programmable switches and wireless base stations that are not ordinarily available at most schools, support for collaborative experimentation and ease of recovering from mistakes. The GENI community has created and made available to instructors ready-to-use exercises based on popular networking textbooks. These exercises cover a range of topics from basic networking to advanced concepts such as software defined networking and network function virtualization. They include wired and wireless networking based exercises. GENI is also used as a platform for applications that enhance STEM education at the high- school level and as a platform for MOOC courses that use an interactive approach to teach Internet concepts to non-computer scientists.
     3414</li>
     3415<br>
     3416
     3417
     3418
     3419<li>
    31083420<b>Tiako, Pierre F.</b>
    31093421, &quot;Perspectives of delegation in team-based distributed software development over the GENI infrastructure (NIER track).&quot;
     
    35203832
    35213833<li>
     3834<b>Wroclawski, John and Benzel, Terry and Blythe, Jim and Faber, Ted and Hussain, Alefiya and Mirkovic, Jelena and Schwab, Stephen</b>
     3835, &quot;DETERLab and the DETER Project.&quot;
     3836The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     38372016.
     3838doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;3.
     3839<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;3">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;3</a>
     3840
     3841</li>
     3842<br>
     3843
     3844
     3845
     3846<li>
    35223847<b>Xiao, Zhifeng and Fu, Bo and Xiao, Yang and Chen, C. L. Philip and Liang, Wei</b>
    35233848, &quot;A review of GENI authentication and access control mechanisms.&quot;
     
    35473872<li>
    35483873<b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
     3874, &quot;Scaling up applications over distributed clouds with dynamic layer-2 exchange and broadcast service.&quot;
     3875Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
     38762014.
     3877doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932973.
     3878<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973</a>
     3879<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we study the problem of provisioning large-scale virtual clusters over federated clouds connected by multi-domain, layer-2 wide area networks. We first present the virtual cluster request abstraction and the abstraction models for substrate resource pools. Based on these two abstraction models, we developed a novel layer-2 exchange mechanism and an implementation of it in a multi-domain networked cloud environment. The design of the mechanism takes into consideration the realistic constraints in current network and cloud systems. We show that efficient cluster splitting, cloud data center selection and resource allocation algorithms can be developed to provision large-scale virtual clusters across cloud sites. A prototype system has been deployed and integrated into the ExoGENI testbed for about a year, and is being heavily used by scientific and data analytic applications.
     3880</li>
     3881<br>
     3882
     3883<li>
     3884<b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
    35493885, &quot;Capacity of Inter-cloud Layer-2 Virtual Networking.&quot;
    35503886Proceedings of the 2014 ACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, USA, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     
    35533889<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2627566.2627573">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2627566.2627573</a>
    35543890<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Due to the economy of scale of Ethernet networks and available dynamic circuit capability from the major national research and educational networks, VLAN (Virtual LAN) based virtual networking solution has been successfully adopted in some advanced distributed cloud systems. However, there are two major constraints in this adaptation: (1) dynamic circuit service is far from pervasive; (2) there is only limited VLAN tags offered by regional network service providers. In this paper, after examining layer-2 networking in large-scale distributed cloud environments, we present a graph theoretical model to study the network capacity in terms of the number of inter-cloud connections that can co-exist. We further design the algorithms to achieve this capacity for both point-to-point and multi-point inter-cloud connections in both static and dynamic scenarios. We also study a general topology embedding problem based on this model. As tagging is a common mechanism for isolating communication channels in other network layers, the proposed models and algorithms can be extended to optical and IP networks.
    3555 </li>
    3556 <br>
    3557 
    3558 <li>
    3559 <b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
    3560 , &quot;Scaling up applications over distributed clouds with dynamic layer-2 exchange and broadcast service.&quot;
    3561 Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
    3562 2014.
    3563 doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932973.
    3564 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973</a>
    3565 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we study the problem of provisioning large-scale virtual clusters over federated clouds connected by multi-domain, layer-2 wide area networks. We first present the virtual cluster request abstraction and the abstraction models for substrate resource pools. Based on these two abstraction models, we developed a novel layer-2 exchange mechanism and an implementation of it in a multi-domain networked cloud environment. The design of the mechanism takes into consideration the realistic constraints in current network and cloud systems. We show that efficient cluster splitting, cloud data center selection and resource allocation algorithms can be developed to provision large-scale virtual clusters across cloud sites. A prototype system has been deployed and integrated into the ExoGENI testbed for about a year, and is being heavily used by scientific and data analytic applications.
    35663891</li>
    35673892<br>
     
    39504275
    39514276<li>
     4277<b>Baldin, Ilya and Chase, Jeff and Xin, Yufeng and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul and Castillo, Claris and Orlikowski, Victor and Heermann, Chris and Mills, Jonathan</b>
     4278, &quot;ExoGENI: A Multi-Domain Infrastructure-as-a-Service Testbed.&quot
     4279The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     42802016.
     4281doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;13.
     4282</li>
     4283<br>
     4284
     4285
     4286
     4287<li>
    39524288<b>Baldine, I.</b>
    39534289, &quot;Unique optical networking facilities and cross-layer networking.&quot
     
    40164352
    40174353<li>
     4354<b>Bastin, Nicholas and McGeer, Rick</b>
     4355, &quot;Programmable, Controllable Networks.&quot
     4356The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     43572016.
     4358doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;8.
     4359</li>
     4360<br>
     4361
     4362
     4363
     4364<li>
    40184365<b>Bavier, Andy and Chen, Jim and Mambretti, Joe and McGeer, Rick and McGeer, Sean and Nelson, Jude and O'Connell, Patrick and Ricart, Glenn and Tredger, Stephen and Coady, Yvonne</b>
    40194366, &quot;The GENI experiment engine.&quot
     
    403243792012.
    40334380doi:10.1145/2378975.2378980.
     4381</li>
     4382<br>
     4383
     4384
     4385
     4386<li>
     4387<b>Bavier, Andy and McGeer, Rick</b>
     4388, &quot;The GENI Experiment Engine.&quot
     4389The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     43902016.
     4391doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;11.
    40344392</li>
    40354393<br>
     
    42144572
    42154573<li>
     4574<b>Brinn, Marshall</b>
     4575, &quot;GENI Architecture Foundation.&quot
     4576The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     45772016.
     4578doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;5.
     4579</li>
     4580<br>
     4581
     4582
     4583
     4584<li>
    42164585<b>Brinn, Marshall and Bastin, NIcholas and Bavier, Andrew and Berman, Mark and Chase, Jeffrey and Ricci, Robert</b>
    42174586, &quot;Trust as the Foundation of Resource Exchange in GENI.&quot
     
    43464715
    43474716<li>
     4717<b>Chase, Jeff and Baldin, Ilya</b>
     4718, &quot;A Retrospective on ORCA: Open Resource Control Architecture.&quot
     4719The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     47202016.
     4721doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;7.
     4722</li>
     4723<br>
     4724
     4725
     4726
     4727<li>
     4728<b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
     4729, &quot;Cont2: Social-Aware Content and Contact Based File Search in Delay Tolerant Networks.&quot
     4730Proceedings of the 2013 42Nd International Conference on Parallel Processing, IEEE Computer Society, Washington, DC, USA,
     47312013.
     4732doi:10.1109/icpp.2013.28.
     4733</li>
     4734<br>
     4735
     4736<li>
    43484737<b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
    43494738, &quot;Global optimization of file availability through replication for efficient file sharing in MANETs.&quot
     
    43544743<br>
    43554744
    4356 <li>
    4357 <b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
    4358 , &quot;Cont2: Social-Aware Content and Contact Based File Search in Delay Tolerant Networks.&quot
    4359 Proceedings of the 2013 42Nd International Conference on Parallel Processing, IEEE Computer Society, Washington, DC, USA,
    4360 2013.
    4361 doi:10.1109/icpp.2013.28.
    4362 </li>
    4363 <br>
    4364 
    43654745
    43664746
     
    43884768
    43894769<li>
     4770<b>Chen, Shuoshuo and Ji, Xiang and Veeraraghavan, Malathi and Emmerson, Steve and Slezak, Joseph and Decker, Steven G.</b>
     4771, &quot;A Cross-Layer Multicast-Push Unicast-Pull (MPUP) Architecture for Reliable File-Stream Distribution.&quot
     47722016 IEEE 40th Annual Computer Software and Applications Conference (COMPSAC), Atlanta, GA, USA, IEEE,
     47732016.
     4774doi:10.1109/compsac.2016.28.
     4775</li>
     4776<br>
     4777
     4778
     4779
     4780<li>
    43904781<b>Chen, X. and Cai, H. and Wolf, T.</b>
    43914782, &quot;Multi-criteria Routing in Networks with Path Choices.&quot
     
    45054896
    45064897<li>
     4898<b>Dempsey, HeidiPicher</b>
     4899, &quot;The GENI Mesoscale Network.&quot
     4900The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     49012016.
     4902doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;12.
     4903</li>
     4904<br>
     4905
     4906
     4907
     4908<li>
    45074909<b>Deng, Juan and Brooks, Richard R. and Martin, James</b>
    45084910, &quot;Assessing the Effect of WiMAX System Parameter Settings on MAC-level Local DoS Vulnerability.&quot
     
    46485050
    46495051<li>
     5052<b>Faber, Ted and Schwab, Stephen and Wroclawski, John</b>
     5053, &quot;Authorization and Access Control: ABAC.&quot
     5054The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     50552016.
     5056doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;10.
     5057</li>
     5058<br>
     5059
     5060
     5061
     5062<li>
    46505063<b>Feamster, Nick and Gao, Lixin and Rexford, Jennifer</b>
    46515064, &quot;How to lease the internet in your spare time.&quot
     
    47035116
    47045117<li>
     5118<b>Freeman, PeterA</b>
     5119, &quot;The GENI Vision: Origins, Early History, Possible Futures.&quot
     5120The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     51212016.
     5122doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;1.
     5123</li>
     5124<br>
     5125
     5126
     5127
     5128<li>
    47055129<b>Fund, Fraida and Dong, Chen and Korakis, Thanasis and Panwar, Shivendra</b>
    47065130, &quot;A Framework for Multidimensional Measurements on an Experimental WiMAX Testbed.&quot
     
    48445268
    48455269<li>
     5270<b>Griffioen, James and Fei, Zongming and Nasir, Hussamuddin and Carpenter, Charles and Reed, Jeremy and Wu, Xiongqi and Rivera</b>
     5271, &quot;The GENI Desktop.&quot
     5272The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     52732016.
     5274doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;16.
     5275</li>
     5276<br>
     5277
     5278
     5279
     5280<li>
    48465281<b>Griffioen, James and Fei, Zongming and Nasir, Hussamuddin and Wu, Xiongqi and Reed, Jeremy and Carpenter, Charles</b>
    48475282, &quot;Measuring experiments in GENI.&quot
     
    48995334
    49005335<li>
     5336<b>Hemmings, Matt and Krahn, Robert and Lary, David and McGeer, Rick and Ricart, Glenn and R&#x6f;&#x0308;der, Marko</b>
     5337, &quot;The Ignite Distributed Collaborative Scientific Visualization System.&quot
     5338The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     53392016.
     5340doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;19.
     5341</li>
     5342<br>
     5343
     5344
     5345
     5346<li>
    49015347<b>Herron, Jon-Paul</b>
    49025348, &quot;GENI Meta-Operations Center.&quot
     
    51735619<li>
    51745620<b>Krishnappa, Dilip K. and Lyons, Eric and Irwin, David and Zink, Michael</b>
     5621, &quot;Network capabilities of cloud services for a real time scientific application.&quot
     562237th Annual IEEE Conference on Local Computer Networks, Clearwater Beach, FL, USA, IEEE,
     56232012.
     5624doi:10.1109/lcn.2012.6423665.
     5625</li>
     5626<br>
     5627
     5628<li>
     5629<b>Krishnappa, Dilip K. and Lyons, Eric and Irwin, David and Zink, Michael</b>
    51755630, &quot;Performance of GENI Cloud Testbeds for Real Time Scientific Application.&quot
    51765631First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
    517756322012.
    51785633
    5179 </li>
    5180 <br>
    5181 
    5182 <li>
    5183 <b>Krishnappa, Dilip K. and Lyons, Eric and Irwin, David and Zink, Michael</b>
    5184 , &quot;Network capabilities of cloud services for a real time scientific application.&quot
    5185 37th Annual IEEE Conference on Local Computer Networks, Clearwater Beach, FL, USA, IEEE,
    5186 2012.
    5187 doi:10.1109/lcn.2012.6423665.
    51885634</li>
    51895635<br>
     
    52805726
    52815727<li>
     5728<b>Leon-Garcia, Alberto and Bannazadeh, Hadi</b>
     5729, &quot;SAVI Testbed for Applications on Software-Defined Infrastructure.&quot
     5730The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     57312016.
     5732doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;22.
     5733</li>
     5734<br>
     5735
     5736
     5737
     5738<li>
    52825739<b>Li, Dawei and Hong, Xiaoyan</b>
    52835740, &quot;Practical exploitation on system vulnerability of ProtoGENI.&quot
     
    54015858
    54025859<li>
     5860<b>M&#x75;&#x0308;eller, Paul and Fischer, Stefan</b>
     5861, &quot;Europe's Mission in Next-Generation Networking with Special Emphasis on the German-Lab Project.&quot
     5862The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     58632016.
     5864doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;21.
     5865</li>
     5866<br>
     5867
     5868
     5869
     5870<li>
    54035871<b>Maccherani, E. and Femminella, M. and Lee, J. W. and Francescangeli, R. and Janak, J. and Reali, G. and Schulzrinne, H.</b>
    54045872, &quot;Extending the NetServ autonomic management capabilities using OpenFlow.&quot
     
    54665934<li>
    54675935<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     5936, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot
     5937Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
     59382014.
     5939doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932970.
     5940</li>
     5941<br>
     5942
     5943<li>
     5944<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    54685945, &quot;Next Generation Virtual Network Architecture for Multi-tenant Distributed Clouds: Challenges and Emerging Techniques.&quot
    54695946Proceedings of the 4th Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     
    54735950<br>
    54745951
    5475 <li>
    5476 <b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    5477 , &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot
    5478 Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
    5479 2014.
    5480 doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932970.
     5952
     5953
     5954<li>
     5955<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei and Ge, Jingguo and You, Junling and Li, Tong and de Laat, Cees and Grosso, Paola and Liu, Te-Lung and Luo, Mon-Yen and Nakao, Aki and M&#x75;&#x0308;ller, Paul and van der Pol, Ronald and Reed, Martin and Stanton, Michael and Yang, Chu-Sing</b>
     5956, &quot;Creating a Worldwide Network for the Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) and Related Experimental Environments.&quot
     5957The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     59582016.
     5959doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;24.
    54815960</li>
    54825961<br>
     
    55846063
    55856064<li>
     6065<b>McGeer, Rick and Ricci, Robert</b>
     6066, &quot;The InstaGENI Project.&quot
     6067The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     60682016.
     6069doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;14.
     6070</li>
     6071<br>
     6072
     6073
     6074
     6075<li>
    55866076<b>McKeown, Nick and Anderson, Tom and Balakrishnan, Hari and Parulkar, Guru and Peterson, Larry and Rexford, Jennifer and Shenker, Scott and Turner, Jonathan</b>
    55876077, &quot;OpenFlow: enabling innovation in campus networks.&quot
     
    56506140
    56516141<li>
     6142<b>Nakao, Akihiro and Yamada, Kazuhisa</b>
     6143, &quot;Research and Development on Network Virtualization Technologies in Japan: VNode and FLARE Projects.&quot
     6144The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     61452016.
     6146doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;23.
     6147</li>
     6148<br>
     6149
     6150
     6151
     6152<li>
    56526153<b>Nakauchi, Kiyohide and Nishinaga, Nozomu</b>
    56536154, &quot;Software-defined exchange for the virtualized WiFi network towards future Mobile Cloud services.&quot
     
    57366237
    57376238
     6239
     6240<li>
     6241<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
     6242, &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot
     6243First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
     62442012.
     6245
     6246</li>
     6247<br>
     6248
     6249<li>
     6250<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
     6251, &quot;Operational System Testing for Designed in Security.&quot
     6252Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     62532013.
     6254doi:10.1145/2459976.2460038.
     6255</li>
     6256<br>
    57386257
    57396258<li>
     
    57466265<br>
    57476266
    5748 <li>
    5749 <b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    5750 , &quot;Operational System Testing for Designed in Security.&quot
    5751 Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
    5752 2013.
    5753 doi:10.1145/2459976.2460038.
    5754 </li>
    5755 <br>
    5756 
    5757 <li>
    5758 <b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    5759 , &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot
    5760 First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
    5761 2012.
    5762 
    5763 </li>
    5764 <br>
    5765 
    57666267
    57676268
     
    58556356
    58566357<li>
     6358<b>Rakotoarivelo, Thierry and Jourjon, Guillaume and Mehani, Olivier and Ott, Max and Zink, Michael</b>
     6359, &quot;A Walk Through the GENI Experiment Cycle.&quot
     6360The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     63612016.
     6362doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;17.
     6363</li>
     6364<br>
     6365
     6366
     6367
     6368<li>
    58576369<b>Rakotoarivelo, Thierry and Jourjon, Guillaume and Mehani, Olivier and Ott, Maximilian and Zink, Mike</b>
    58586370, &quot;Repeatable Experiments with LabWiki.&quot
     
    59216433
    59226434<li>
     6435<b>Raychaudhuri, Dipankar and Seskar, Ivan and Ott, Max</b>
     6436, &quot;ORBIT: Wireless Experimentation.&quot
     6437The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     64382016.
     6439doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;4.
     6440</li>
     6441<br>
     6442
     6443
     6444
     6445<li>
    59236446<b>Ricart, Glenn</b>
    59246447, &quot;US Ignite testbeds: Advanced testbeds enable next-generation applications.&quot
     
    59326455
    59336456<li>
     6457<b>Ricart, Glenn and McGeer, Rick</b>
     6458, &quot;US Ignite and Smarter Communities.&quot
     6459The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     64602016.
     6461doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;20.
     6462</li>
     6463<br>
     6464
     6465
     6466
     6467<li>
     6468<b>Ricci, Robert</b>
     6469, &quot;The Need for Flexible Community Research Infrastructure.&quot
     6470The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     64712016.
     6472doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;6.
     6473</li>
     6474<br>
     6475
     6476
     6477
     6478<li>
    59346479<b>Ricci, Robert and Eide, Eric</b>
    59356480, &quot;Introducing CloudLab:Scientific Infrastructure for Advancing Cloud Architecturesand Applications.&quot
     
    59436488
    59446489<li>
     6490<b>Ricci, Robert and Team, The Emulab</b>
     6491, &quot;Precursors: Emulab.&quot
     6492The GENI Book, Springer International Publishing,
     64932016.
     6494doi:10.1007/978-3-319-33769-2&#x005F;2.
     6495</li>
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