Changes between Version 42 and Version 43 of GENIBibliography


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Timestamp:
08/16/16 10:14:01 (3 years ago)
Author:
Mark Berman
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  • GENIBibliography

    v42 v43  
    2323== Adding to this bibliography ==
    2424
    25 We welcome your contributions to this bibliography. Please send references to [mailto:mberman@bbn.com Mark Berman] and [mailto:nriga@bbn.com Niky Riga]. Preferred formats are:
     25We welcome your contributions to this bibliography. Please send references to [mailto:mberman@bbn.com Mark Berman]. Preferred formats are:
    2626
    2727 * URL for abstract on IEEE Explore, ACM Digital Library, or similar (e.g., http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1568620)
     
    8484
    8585<li>
     86<b>Alali, Fatma and Veeraraghavan, Malathi</b>
     87, &quot;A cross-layer design for large transfers in SDNs.&quot;
     882016 Eighth International Conference on Ubiquitous and Future Networks (ICUFN), IEEE,
     892016.
     90doi:10.1109/icufn.2016.7537142.
     91<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icufn.2016.7537142">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icufn.2016.7537142</a>
     92<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Network (SDN) technologies have enabled the introduction of new services such as dynamic Layer-1 (L1) circuits and Layer-2 (L2) virtual circuits (VCs). This work presents a cross-layer design that leverages transport- and link-layer protocols to enable the full use of high-rate circuits/VCs to achieve high-throughput transfers. Three cases are considered: (i) single circuit/rate-guaranteed VC for a single large transfer from a server, (ii) multiple simultaneous large transfers from a server, and (iii) semi-rate-guaranteed VC. Circuit TCP (CTCP) and the Token Bucket Filter (TBF) queueing discipline of the Linux traffic control (tc) utility are recommended for the first case, and parameter selection methods are provided. For the second case, the tc Hierarchical Token Bucket (HTB) discipline is recommended as it supports dynamic additions and deletions of classes without impact on ongoing large-transfer flows using existing classes. For the third case, CTCP is recommended if the large-transfer throughput is the primary concern, while HTCP is recommended if higher consideration is given to other flows.
     93</li>
     94<br>
     95
     96
     97
     98<li>
    8699<b>Albrecht, J. and Huang, D. Y.</b>
    87100, &quot;Managing distributed applications using Gush.&quot;
     
    696709<li>
    697710<b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
    698 , &quot;Cont2: Social-Aware Content and Contact Based File Search in Delay Tolerant Networks.&quot;
    699 Proceedings of the 2013 42Nd International Conference on Parallel Processing, IEEE Computer Society, Washington, DC, USA,
    700 2013.
    701 doi:10.1109/icpp.2013.28.
    702 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icpp.2013.28">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icpp.2013.28</a>
    703 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we focus on distributed file search over a delay tolerant network (DTN) formed by mobile devices that exhibit the characteristics of social networks. Current file search methods in MANETs/DTNs are either content-based or contact-based. The former builds routing tables for node contents but is not resilient to high node mobility, while the latter exploits node contact patterns in the social networks but may lead to high latency. Recent research also reveal the importance of interests in realizing efficient file dissemination in DTNs. In this paper, we first analyze node interest and mobility from real traces, which confirms the shortcomings of a contact based method and show the importance of considering both content/interest and contact in file search. We then propose Cont2, a social-aware file search method which leverages both node social interests (content) and contact patterns to enhance search efficiency. First, considering people with common interests tend to share files and gather together, Cont2 virtually groups common-interest nodes into a community to direct file search. Second, considering human mobility follows a certain pattern, Cont2 exploits nodes that have high contact frequency with the queried content. Third, Cont2 also exploits active nodes that have more connections to others as a complementary approach to expedite file search. Trace-driven experimental on the real-world GENI test bed and NS-2 simulator show that Cont2 can significantly improve the search efficiency compared to current methods.
    704 </li>
    705 <br>
    706 
    707 <li>
    708 <b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
    709711, &quot;Global optimization of file availability through replication for efficient file sharing in MANETs.&quot;
    710712Network Protocols (ICNP), 2011 19th IEEE International Conference on, Vancouver, AB, Canada, IEEE,
     
    713715<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2011.6089056">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2011.6089056</a>
    714716<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>File sharing applications in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) have attracted more and more attention in recent years. The efficiency of file querying suffers from the distinctive properties of MANETs including node mobility and limited communication range and resource. An intuitive method to alleviate this problem is to create file replicas in the network. However, despite the efforts on file replication, no research has focused on the global optimal replica sharing with minimum average querying delay. Specifically, current file replication protocols in MANETs have two shortcomings. First, they lack a rule to allocate limited resource to different files in order to minimize the average querying delay. Second, they simply consider storage as resource for replicas, but neglect the fact that the file holders' frequency of meeting other nodes also plays an important role in determining file availability. A node having a higher meeting frequency with others provides higher availability to its files. In this paper, we introduce a new concept of resource for file replication, which considers both node storage and meeting frequency. We theoretically study the influence of resource allocation on the average querying delay and derive a resource allocation rule to minimize the average querying delay. We further propose a distributed file replication protocol that follows the rule. The trace-driven experiments on both the real-world GENI testbed and NS-2 show that our protocol can achieve shorter average querying delay at lower cost than current replication protocols, which justifies the correctness of our theoretical analysis and the effectiveness of the proposed protocol.
     717</li>
     718<br>
     719
     720<li>
     721<b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
     722, &quot;Cont2: Social-Aware Content and Contact Based File Search in Delay Tolerant Networks.&quot;
     723Proceedings of the 2013 42Nd International Conference on Parallel Processing, IEEE Computer Society, Washington, DC, USA,
     7242013.
     725doi:10.1109/icpp.2013.28.
     726<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icpp.2013.28">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icpp.2013.28</a>
     727<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we focus on distributed file search over a delay tolerant network (DTN) formed by mobile devices that exhibit the characteristics of social networks. Current file search methods in MANETs/DTNs are either content-based or contact-based. The former builds routing tables for node contents but is not resilient to high node mobility, while the latter exploits node contact patterns in the social networks but may lead to high latency. Recent research also reveal the importance of interests in realizing efficient file dissemination in DTNs. In this paper, we first analyze node interest and mobility from real traces, which confirms the shortcomings of a contact based method and show the importance of considering both content/interest and contact in file search. We then propose Cont2, a social-aware file search method which leverages both node social interests (content) and contact patterns to enhance search efficiency. First, considering people with common interests tend to share files and gather together, Cont2 virtually groups common-interest nodes into a community to direct file search. Second, considering human mobility follows a certain pattern, Cont2 exploits nodes that have high contact frequency with the queried content. Third, Cont2 also exploits active nodes that have more connections to others as a complementary approach to expedite file search. Trace-driven experimental on the real-world GENI test bed and NS-2 simulator show that Cont2 can significantly improve the search efficiency compared to current methods.
    715728</li>
    716729<br>
     
    818831<br>
    819832
     833<li>
     834<b>Chin, Tommy and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
     835, &quot;MPBSD: A Moving Target Defense Approach for Base Station Security in Wireless Sensor Networks.&quot;
     836Wireless Algorithms, Systems, and Applications, Springer International Publishing,
     8372016.
     838doi:10.1007/978-3-319-42836-9&#x005F;43.
     839<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-42836-9&#x005F;43">http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-42836-9&#x005F;43</a>
     840<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>This paper addresses one major concern on how to secure the location information of a base station in a compromised Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). In this concern, disrupting or damaging the wireless base station can be catastrophic for a WSN. To aid in the mitigation of this challenge, we present Moving Proximity Base Station Defense (MPBSD), a Moving Target Defense (MTD) approach to concealing the location of a base station within a WSN. In this approach, we employ multiple base stations to serve a WSN where one of the multiple base stations is elected to serve the WSN in a specific period of time. Specifically, our approach periodically changes the designation over a period of time to provide obscurity in the location information of the base station. We further evaluate MPBSD using a real-world testbed environment utilizing Wi-Fi frequencies. Our results show that MPBSD is an effective MTD approach to securing base stations for a WSN in term of sensory performance such as end-to-end delay.
     841</li>
     842<br>
     843
    820844
    821845
     
    14831507<li>
    14841508<b>Juluri, Parikshit and Tamarapalli, Venkatesh and Medhi, Deep</b>
    1485 , &quot;SARA: Segment aware rate adaptation algorithm for dynamic adaptive streaming over HTTP.&quot;
    1486 Communication Workshop (ICCW), 2015 IEEE International Conference on, IEEE,
    1487 2015.
    1488 doi:10.1109/iccw.2015.7247436.
    1489 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/iccw.2015.7247436">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/iccw.2015.7247436</a>
    1490 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Dynamic adaptive HTTP (DASH) based streaming is steadily becoming the most popular online video streaming technique. DASH streaming provides seamless playback by adapting the video quality to the network conditions during the video playback. A DASH server supports adaptive streaming by hosting multiple representations of the video and each representation is divided into small segments of equal playback duration. At the client end, the video player uses an adaptive bitrate selection (ABR) algorithm to decide the bitrate to be selected for each segment depending on the current network conditions. Currently, proposed ABR algorithms ignore the fact that the segment sizes significantly vary for a given video bitrate. Due to this, even though an ABR algorithm is able to measure the network bandwidth, it may fail to predict the time to download the next segment In this paper, we propose a segment-aware rate adaptation (SARA) algorithm that considers the segment size variation in addition to the estimated path bandwidth and the current buffer occupancy to accurately predict the time required to download the next segment We also developed an open source Python based emulated DASH video player, that was used to compare the performance of SARA and a basic ABR. Our results show that SARA provides a significant gain over the basic algorithm in the video quality delivered, without noticeably impacting the video switching rates.
    1491 </li>
    1492 <br>
    1493 
    1494 <li>
    1495 <b>Juluri, Parikshit and Tamarapalli, Venkatesh and Medhi, Deep</b>
    14961509, &quot;QoE management in DASH systems using the segment aware rate adaptation algorithm.&quot;
    14971510NOMS 2016 - 2016 IEEE/IFIP Network Operations and Management Symposium, IEEE,
     
    15001513<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/noms.2016.7502805">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/noms.2016.7502805</a>
    15011514<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) enables the video player to adapt the bitrate of the video while streaming to ensure playback without interruptions even with varying throughput. A DASH server hosts multiple representations of the same video, each of which is broken down into small segments of fixed playback duration. The video bitrate adaptation is purely driven by the player at the endhost. Typically, the player employs an Adaptive Bitrate (ABR) algorithm, that determines the most appropriate representation for the next segment to be downloaded, based on the current network conditions and user preferences. The aim of an ABR algorithm is to dynamically manage the Quality of Experience (QoE) of the user during the playback. ABR algorithms manage the QoE by maximizing the bitrate while at the same time trying to minimize the other QoE metrics: playback start time, duration and number of buffering events, and the number of bitrate switching events. Typically, the ABR algorithms manage the QoE by using the measured network throughput and buffer occupancy to adapt the playback bitrate. However, due to the video encoding schemes employed, the sizes of the individual segments may vary significantly. For low bandwidth networks, fluctuation in the segment sizes results in inaccurate estimation the expected segment fetch times, thereby resulting in inaccurate estimation of the optimum bitrate. In this paper we demonstrate how the Segment-Aware Rate Adaptation (SARA) algorithm, that considers the measured throughput, buffer occupancy, and the variation in segment sizes helps in better management of the users' QoE in a DASH system. By comparing with a typical throughput-based and buffer-based adaptation algorithm under varying network conditions, we demonstrate that SARA manages the QoE better, especially in a low bandwidth network. We also developed AStream, an open-source Python-based emulated DASH-video player that was used to evaluate three different ABR algor- thms and measure the QoE metrics with each of them.
     1515</li>
     1516<br>
     1517
     1518<li>
     1519<b>Juluri, Parikshit and Tamarapalli, Venkatesh and Medhi, Deep</b>
     1520, &quot;SARA: Segment aware rate adaptation algorithm for dynamic adaptive streaming over HTTP.&quot;
     1521Communication Workshop (ICCW), 2015 IEEE International Conference on, IEEE,
     15222015.
     1523doi:10.1109/iccw.2015.7247436.
     1524<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/iccw.2015.7247436">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/iccw.2015.7247436</a>
     1525<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Dynamic adaptive HTTP (DASH) based streaming is steadily becoming the most popular online video streaming technique. DASH streaming provides seamless playback by adapting the video quality to the network conditions during the video playback. A DASH server supports adaptive streaming by hosting multiple representations of the video and each representation is divided into small segments of equal playback duration. At the client end, the video player uses an adaptive bitrate selection (ABR) algorithm to decide the bitrate to be selected for each segment depending on the current network conditions. Currently, proposed ABR algorithms ignore the fact that the segment sizes significantly vary for a given video bitrate. Due to this, even though an ABR algorithm is able to measure the network bandwidth, it may fail to predict the time to download the next segment In this paper, we propose a segment-aware rate adaptation (SARA) algorithm that considers the segment size variation in addition to the estimated path bandwidth and the current buffer occupancy to accurately predict the time required to download the next segment We also developed an open source Python based emulated DASH video player, that was used to compare the performance of SARA and a basic ABR. Our results show that SARA provides a significant gain over the basic algorithm in the video quality delivered, without noticeably impacting the video switching rates.
    15021526</li>
    15031527<br>
     
    19992023<li>
    20002024<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     2025, &quot;Creating environments for innovation: Designing and implementing advanced experimental network research testbeds based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility and the StarLight Exchange.&quot;
     2026Computer Networks,
     20272014.
     2028doi:10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024.
     2029<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024">http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024</a>
     2030<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Large scale national and international experimental research environments are required to advance communication services and supporting network architecture, technology, and infrastructure. Theories and concepts are often explored using simulation and modeling techniques within labs or on small scale testbeds. However, while such testbeds are valuable resources for the research process, these facilities alone cannot provide an appropriate approximation of the real world conditions required to explore ideas at scale. Very large scale global, experimental network research capabilities are required to deeply investigate innovative concepts. For many years, network testbeds were created to address fairly specific, well defined, limited research goals, and they were implemented for fairly short periods. Recently, taking advantage of a number of macro information technology trends, such as virtualization and programmable resources, several network research communities have been developing innovative types of network research environments. Instead of designing traditional network testbeds, research communities are designing large scale, highly flexible distributed platforms that can be used to create many different types of testbeds. Also, rather than creating short term testbeds for limited research objectives, these new environments are being designed as long term persistent resources to support many types of experimental research. This paper describes the motivations for this trend, provides several examples of large scale distributed network research environments based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility (GLIF) and the StarLight Exchange Facility, including the Global Environment for Network Innovation (GENI), and indicates emerging future trends for these types of environments.
     2031</li>
     2032<br>
     2033
     2034<li>
     2035<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     2036, &quot;Next Generation Virtual Network Architecture for Multi-tenant Distributed Clouds: Challenges and Emerging Techniques.&quot;
     2037Proceedings of the 4th Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     20382016.
     2039doi:10.1145/2955193.2955194.
     2040<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2955193.2955194">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2955193.2955194</a>
     2041<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Providing services for multiple tenants within a single or federated distributed cloud environment requires a variety of special considerations related to network design, provisioning, and operations. Especially important are multiple topics concerning the implementation of multiple parallel programmable virtual networks for large numbers of tenants, who require autonomous management, control, and data planes. This paper provides an overview of some of the challenges that arise from developing and implementing parallel programmable virtual networks, describes experiences with several experimental techniques for addressing those challenges based on large scale distributed testbeds, and presents the results of the experiments that were conducted. Distributed environments used include a distributed cloud testbed, the Chameleon Cloud, sponsored by the National Science Foundation's NSFCloud program, the NSF's Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI), an international distributed OpenFlow testbed, and the Open Science Data Cloud.
     2042</li>
     2043<br>
     2044
     2045<li>
     2046<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    20012047, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot;
    20022048Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
     
    20052051<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970</a>
    20062052<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Networks (SDNs), primarily based on OpenFlow, are being deployed in single domain networks around the world. The popularity of SDNs has given rise to multiple considerations about designing, implementing, and operating Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs), to enable SDNs to interconnect SDN islands and to extend SDNs across multiple domains. These goals can be accomplished only by developing new techniques that extend the single domain orientation of current SDN/OpenFlow approaches to include capabilities for multidomain control, including those for resource discovery, signaling, and dynamic provisioning. Several networking research communities have begun to investigate these concepts. Early architectural models of SDXs have been designed and implemented as prototypes. These SDXs are being used to conduct experiments and to demonstrate the potentials of SDXs.
    2007 </li>
    2008 <br>
    2009 
    2010 <li>
    2011 <b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    2012 , &quot;Creating environments for innovation: Designing and implementing advanced experimental network research testbeds based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility and the StarLight Exchange.&quot;
    2013 Computer Networks,
    2014 2014.
    2015 doi:10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024.
    2016 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024">http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024</a>
    2017 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Large scale national and international experimental research environments are required to advance communication services and supporting network architecture, technology, and infrastructure. Theories and concepts are often explored using simulation and modeling techniques within labs or on small scale testbeds. However, while such testbeds are valuable resources for the research process, these facilities alone cannot provide an appropriate approximation of the real world conditions required to explore ideas at scale. Very large scale global, experimental network research capabilities are required to deeply investigate innovative concepts. For many years, network testbeds were created to address fairly specific, well defined, limited research goals, and they were implemented for fairly short periods. Recently, taking advantage of a number of macro information technology trends, such as virtualization and programmable resources, several network research communities have been developing innovative types of network research environments. Instead of designing traditional network testbeds, research communities are designing large scale, highly flexible distributed platforms that can be used to create many different types of testbeds. Also, rather than creating short term testbeds for limited research objectives, these new environments are being designed as long term persistent resources to support many types of experimental research. This paper describes the motivations for this trend, provides several examples of large scale distributed network research environments based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility (GLIF) and the StarLight Exchange Facility, including the Global Environment for Network Innovation (GENI), and indicates emerging future trends for these types of environments.
    20182053</li>
    20192054<br>
     
    23332368<li>
    23342369<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    2335 , &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot;
    2336 First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
    2337 2012.
    2338 
    2339 
    2340 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks are major security threats to the Internet. The distributed structure of these attacks makes it difficult to distinguish between legitimate and attack traffic, making detection difficult. In addition to this challenge, researchers also have to study and find countermeasures against these attacks without using an operational network for testing, since attacks on operational networks inconvenience users. In this paper, we propose a method to perform DDoS analysis on real hardware using real traffic without jeopardizing the original network. We implement our experiments on the Geni testbed using Openflow. We present results from DDoS detection methods using operational traffic.
    2341 </li>
    2342 <br>
    2343 
    2344 <li>
    2345 <b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    23462370, &quot;Operational System Testing for Designed in Security.&quot;
    23472371Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     
    23502374<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2459976.2460038">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2459976.2460038</a>
    23512375<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>To design secure systems, one needs to understand how attackers use system vulnerabilities in their favor. This requires testing vulnerabilities on operational systems. However, working on operational systems is not always possible because of the risk of disturbance. In this study, we introduce an approach to experimenting using operational system data and performing real attacks without disturbing the original system. We applied this approach to a network security experiment and tested the performance of three detection methods. The approach used in this study can be used when developing systems with Designed-in Security to identify and test system vulnerabilities.
     2376</li>
     2377<br>
     2378
     2379<li>
     2380<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
     2381, &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot;
     2382First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
     23832012.
     2384
     2385
     2386<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks are major security threats to the Internet. The distributed structure of these attacks makes it difficult to distinguish between legitimate and attack traffic, making detection difficult. In addition to this challenge, researchers also have to study and find countermeasures against these attacks without using an operational network for testing, since attacks on operational networks inconvenience users. In this paper, we propose a method to perform DDoS analysis on real hardware using real traffic without jeopardizing the original network. We implement our experiments on the Geni testbed using Openflow. We present results from DDoS detection methods using operational traffic.
    23522387</li>
    23532388<br>
     
    24342469
    24352470<li>
     2471<b>Rahimi, Reza and Veeraraghavan, M. and Nakajima, Y. and Takahashi, H. and Nakajima, Y. and Okamoto, S. and Yamanaka, N.</b>
     2472, &quot;A high-performance OpenFlow software switch.&quot;
     24732016 IEEE 17th International Conference on High Performance Switching and Routing (HPSR), IEEE,
     24742016.
     2475doi:10.1109/hpsr.2016.7525645.
     2476<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/hpsr.2016.7525645">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/hpsr.2016.7525645</a>
     2477<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software switches offer flexibility to service providers but potentially suffer from low performance. A software switch called Lagopus was implemented using Intel's Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK), which offers libraries for high-performance packet handling. Prior work on software switches focused on characterizing packet forwarding throughput. In this work, we evaluated the impact of certain parameters and settings in Lagopus on application performance and studied packet drop rates. The importance of receive-thread packet classification for load balancing and to send delay-sensitive flows to a different worker thread from high-throughput flows was first demonstrated. Next, we showed that a loop-count variable used to control packet batching should be kept small in case link utilization is low. Finally, we showed that packet drop rate could be non-zero when the OpenFlow table size is large and packet arrival rate is high, and interestingly, the packet drop rate was higher with four worker threads than with a single worker thread. This implies a need for careful calibration and planning of the parameters of parallelization.
     2478</li>
     2479<br>
     2480
     2481
     2482
     2483<li>
    24362484<b>Rajagopalan, Sudharsan</b>
    24372485, &quot;Leveraging OpenFlow for Resource Placement of Virtual Desktop Cloud Applications.&quot;
     
    24752523<b>Ramisetty, Shravya and Calyam, Prasad and Cecil, J. and Akula, Amit R. and Antequera, Ronny B. and Leto, Ray</b>
    24762524, &quot;Ontology integration for advanced manufacturing collaboration in cloud platforms.&quot;
    2477 Integrated Network Management (IM), 2015 IFIP/IEEE International Symposium on, IEEE,
     25252015 IFIP/IEEE International Symposium on Integrated Network Management (IM), IEEE,
    247825262015.
    24792527doi:10.1109/inm.2015.7140329.
     
    31623210
    31633211<li>
     3212<b>Ujcich, Benjamin E.</b>
     3213, &quot;An Attack Model, Language, and Injector for the Control Plane of Software-Defined Networks (Master's Thesis).&quot;
     3214
     32152016.
     3216
     3217<a href="https://www.perform.illinois.edu/Papers/USAN&#x005F;papers/16UJC01.pdf">https://www.perform.illinois.edu/Papers/USAN&#x005F;papers/16UJC01.pdf</a>
     3218<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software-defined networking (SDN) is an emerging paradigm that differs from traditional approaches to computer networking by decoupling how traffic forwarding should be performed from the traffic itself, logically centralizing the related decisions through one or more controllers, and providing a standardized control protocol among network forwarding devices (e.g., switches) and controller(s). Much of the recent research in the networking community has focused on what is now possible because of the exibility of SDN architectures, but what is less understood is 1) the resilience of SDN to intentional, malicious attacks against system components and 2) how the control protocol affects and is affected by these attacks. Significant challenges include systematically establishing what attacks are possible in the control protocol and understanding the ramifications of attacks on controllers, switches, network applications, and overall network behavior. This thesis introduces a model, a language, and an injector for describing and injecting attacks into the control plane of the OpenFlow-based SDN architecture. First, we define an attack model that models the components in the SDN network and the assumptions about an attacker's capabilities against control plane messages. Second, we define an attack language that allows for attacks to be described based on the semantics of the OpenFlow protocol. Third, we describe an attack injection architecture that uses the aforementioned attack model and language to actuate attacks that demonstrate vulnerabilities in the design, implementation, and configuration of an SDN-based architecture. Finally, we motivate our design with an enterprise network use case and demonstrate the efficacy of our injector by injecting attacks and understanding the attacks' results.
     3219</li>
     3220<br>
     3221
     3222
     3223
     3224<li>
    31643225<b>Valancius, Vytautas and Feamster, Nick</b>
    31653226, &quot;Multiplexing BGP sessions with BGP-Mux.&quot;
     
    34863547<li>
    34873548<b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
     3549, &quot;Capacity of Inter-cloud Layer-2 Virtual Networking.&quot;
     3550Proceedings of the 2014 ACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, USA, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     35512014.
     3552doi:10.1145/2627566.2627573.
     3553<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2627566.2627573">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2627566.2627573</a>
     3554<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Due to the economy of scale of Ethernet networks and available dynamic circuit capability from the major national research and educational networks, VLAN (Virtual LAN) based virtual networking solution has been successfully adopted in some advanced distributed cloud systems. However, there are two major constraints in this adaptation: (1) dynamic circuit service is far from pervasive; (2) there is only limited VLAN tags offered by regional network service providers. In this paper, after examining layer-2 networking in large-scale distributed cloud environments, we present a graph theoretical model to study the network capacity in terms of the number of inter-cloud connections that can co-exist. We further design the algorithms to achieve this capacity for both point-to-point and multi-point inter-cloud connections in both static and dynamic scenarios. We also study a general topology embedding problem based on this model. As tagging is a common mechanism for isolating communication channels in other network layers, the proposed models and algorithms can be extended to optical and IP networks.
     3555</li>
     3556<br>
     3557
     3558<li>
     3559<b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
    34883560, &quot;Scaling up applications over distributed clouds with dynamic layer-2 exchange and broadcast service.&quot;
    34893561Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
     
    34923564<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973</a>
    34933565<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we study the problem of provisioning large-scale virtual clusters over federated clouds connected by multi-domain, layer-2 wide area networks. We first present the virtual cluster request abstraction and the abstraction models for substrate resource pools. Based on these two abstraction models, we developed a novel layer-2 exchange mechanism and an implementation of it in a multi-domain networked cloud environment. The design of the mechanism takes into consideration the realistic constraints in current network and cloud systems. We show that efficient cluster splitting, cloud data center selection and resource allocation algorithms can be developed to provision large-scale virtual clusters across cloud sites. A prototype system has been deployed and integrated into the ExoGENI testbed for about a year, and is being heavily used by scientific and data analytic applications.
    3494 </li>
    3495 <br>
    3496 
    3497 <li>
    3498 <b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
    3499 , &quot;Capacity of Inter-cloud Layer-2 Virtual Networking.&quot;
    3500 Proceedings of the 2014 ACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, USA, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
    3501 2014.
    3502 doi:10.1145/2627566.2627573.
    3503 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2627566.2627573">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2627566.2627573</a>
    3504 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Due to the economy of scale of Ethernet networks and available dynamic circuit capability from the major national research and educational networks, VLAN (Virtual LAN) based virtual networking solution has been successfully adopted in some advanced distributed cloud systems. However, there are two major constraints in this adaptation: (1) dynamic circuit service is far from pervasive; (2) there is only limited VLAN tags offered by regional network service providers. In this paper, after examining layer-2 networking in large-scale distributed cloud environments, we present a graph theoretical model to study the network capacity in terms of the number of inter-cloud connections that can co-exist. We further design the algorithms to achieve this capacity for both point-to-point and multi-point inter-cloud connections in both static and dynamic scenarios. We also study a general topology embedding problem based on this model. As tagging is a common mechanism for isolating communication channels in other network layers, the proposed models and algorithms can be extended to optical and IP networks.
    35053566</li>
    35063567<br>
     
    37573818
    37583819<li>
     3820<b>Alali, Fatma and Veeraraghavan, Malathi</b>
     3821, &quot;A cross-layer design for large transfers in SDNs.&quot
     38222016 Eighth International Conference on Ubiquitous and Future Networks (ICUFN), IEEE,
     38232016.
     3824doi:10.1109/icufn.2016.7537142.
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     3830<li>
    37593831<b>Albrecht, J. and Huang, D. Y.</b>
    37603832, &quot;Managing distributed applications using Gush.&quot
     
    42754347<li>
    42764348<b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
    4277 , &quot;Cont2: Social-Aware Content and Contact Based File Search in Delay Tolerant Networks.&quot
    4278 Proceedings of the 2013 42Nd International Conference on Parallel Processing, IEEE Computer Society, Washington, DC, USA,
    4279 2013.
    4280 doi:10.1109/icpp.2013.28.
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    4282 <br>
    4283 
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    4285 <b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
    42864349, &quot;Global optimization of file availability through replication for efficient file sharing in MANETs.&quot
    42874350Network Protocols (ICNP), 2011 19th IEEE International Conference on, Vancouver, AB, Canada, IEEE,
    428843512011.
    42894352doi:10.1109/icnp.2011.6089056.
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     4358, &quot;Cont2: Social-Aware Content and Contact Based File Search in Delay Tolerant Networks.&quot
     4359Proceedings of the 2013 42Nd International Conference on Parallel Processing, IEEE Computer Society, Washington, DC, USA,
     43602013.
     4361doi:10.1109/icpp.2013.28.
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     4452<b>Chin, Tommy and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
     4453, &quot;MPBSD: A Moving Target Defense Approach for Base Station Security in Wireless Sensor Networks.&quot
     4454Wireless Algorithms, Systems, and Applications, Springer International Publishing,
     44552016.
     4456doi:10.1007/978-3-319-42836-9&#x005F;43.
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    49415022<b>Juluri, Parikshit and Tamarapalli, Venkatesh and Medhi, Deep</b>
    4942 , &quot;SARA: Segment aware rate adaptation algorithm for dynamic adaptive streaming over HTTP.&quot
    4943 Communication Workshop (ICCW), 2015 IEEE International Conference on, IEEE,
    4944 2015.
    4945 doi:10.1109/iccw.2015.7247436.
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    4948 
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    4950 <b>Juluri, Parikshit and Tamarapalli, Venkatesh and Medhi, Deep</b>
    49515023, &quot;QoE management in DASH systems using the segment aware rate adaptation algorithm.&quot
    49525024NOMS 2016 - 2016 IEEE/IFIP Network Operations and Management Symposium, IEEE,
    495350252016.
    49545026doi:10.1109/noms.2016.7502805.
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     5031<b>Juluri, Parikshit and Tamarapalli, Venkatesh and Medhi, Deep</b>
     5032, &quot;SARA: Segment aware rate adaptation algorithm for dynamic adaptive streaming over HTTP.&quot
     5033Communication Workshop (ICCW), 2015 IEEE International Conference on, IEEE,
     50342015.
     5035doi:10.1109/iccw.2015.7247436.
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    53775458<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     5459, &quot;Creating environments for innovation: Designing and implementing advanced experimental network research testbeds based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility and the StarLight Exchange.&quot
     5460Computer Networks,
     54612014.
     5462doi:10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024.
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     5466<li>
     5467<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     5468, &quot;Next Generation Virtual Network Architecture for Multi-tenant Distributed Clouds: Challenges and Emerging Techniques.&quot
     5469Proceedings of the 4th Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     54702016.
     5471doi:10.1145/2955193.2955194.
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    53785477, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot
    53795478Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
    538054792014.
    53815480doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932970.
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    5384 
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    5386 <b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    5387 , &quot;Creating environments for innovation: Designing and implementing advanced experimental network research testbeds based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility and the StarLight Exchange.&quot
    5388 Computer Networks,
    5389 2014.
    5390 doi:10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024.
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     5751Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
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    56605759, &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot
    56615760First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
    566257612012.
    56635762
    5664 </li>
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    5666 
    5667 <li>
    5668 <b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    5669 , &quot;Operational System Testing for Designed in Security.&quot
    5670 Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
    5671 2013.
    5672 doi:10.1145/2459976.2460038.
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     5835<b>Rahimi, Reza and Veeraraghavan, M. and Nakajima, Y. and Takahashi, H. and Nakajima, Y. and Okamoto, S. and Yamanaka, N.</b>
     5836, &quot;A high-performance OpenFlow software switch.&quot
     58372016 IEEE 17th International Conference on High Performance Switching and Routing (HPSR), IEEE,
     58382016.
     5839doi:10.1109/hpsr.2016.7525645.
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     5845<li>
    57455846<b>Rajagopalan, Sudharsan</b>
    57465847, &quot;Leveraging OpenFlow for Resource Placement of Virtual Desktop Cloud Applications.&quot
     
    57785879<b>Ramisetty, Shravya and Calyam, Prasad and Cecil, J. and Akula, Amit R. and Antequera, Ronny B. and Leto, Ray</b>
    57795880, &quot;Ontology integration for advanced manufacturing collaboration in cloud platforms.&quot
    5780 Integrated Network Management (IM), 2015 IFIP/IEEE International Symposium on, IEEE,
     58812015 IFIP/IEEE International Symposium on Integrated Network Management (IM), IEEE,
    578158822015.
    57825883doi:10.1109/inm.2015.7140329.
     
    63596460
    63606461<li>
     6462<b>Ujcich, Benjamin E.</b>
     6463, &quot;An Attack Model, Language, and Injector for the Control Plane of Software-Defined Networks (Master's Thesis).&quot
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     64652016.
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     6467</li>
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     6472<li>
    63616473<b>Valancius, Vytautas and Feamster, Nick</b>
    63626474, &quot;Multiplexing BGP sessions with BGP-Mux.&quot
     
    66336745<li>
    66346746<b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
     6747, &quot;Capacity of Inter-cloud Layer-2 Virtual Networking.&quot
     6748Proceedings of the 2014 ACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, USA, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     67492014.
     6750doi:10.1145/2627566.2627573.
     6751</li>
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     6753
     6754<li>
     6755<b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
    66356756, &quot;Scaling up applications over distributed clouds with dynamic layer-2 exchange and broadcast service.&quot
    66366757Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
    663767582014.
    66386759doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932973.
    6639 </li>
    6640 <br>
    6641 
    6642 <li>
    6643 <b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
    6644 , &quot;Capacity of Inter-cloud Layer-2 Virtual Networking.&quot
    6645 Proceedings of the 2014 ACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, USA, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
    6646 2014.
    6647 doi:10.1145/2627566.2627573.
    66486760</li>
    66496761<br>