Changes between Version 36 and Version 37 of GENIBibliography


Ignore:
Timestamp:
03/05/16 17:00:42 (7 years ago)
Author:
Mark Berman
Comment:

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  • GENIBibliography

    v36 v37  
    437437<li>
    438438<b>Yuen, Marco</b>
    439 , &quot;GENI in the Cloud.&quot;
     439, &quot;GENI in the Cloud (Master's Thesis).&quot;
    440440
    4414412010.
     
    13391339
    13401340<li>
     1341<b>Rosen, Aaron</b>
     1342, &quot;Network Service Delivery and Throughput Optimization via Software Defined Networking (Master's Thesis).&quot;
     1343
     13442012.
     1345
     1346<a href="http://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all&#x005F;theses/1332/">http://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all&#x005F;theses/1332/</a>
     1347<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In today's world, transmitting data across large bandwidth-delay product (BDP) networks requires special configuration on end users' machines in order to be done efficiently. This added level of complexity creates extra cost and is usually overlooked by users unknowledgeable to the issues. This is one example problem which can be ameliorated with the emerging software defined networking (SDN) paradigm. In an SDN, packet forwarding is controlled via software controllers. In an OpenFlow SDN, a controller can control the forwarding, rewriting, and dropping of packets based on their header attributes. The ability to handle packets in customizable ways in software has significant implications for both users and operators of the network. Via SDN, network providers can easily provide services to enhance users' experience of the network. Steroid OpenFlow Service (SOS) is presented as a solution to seamless enhancement of TCP data transfer throughput over large BDP networks without any modification to the software and configurations on users' machines. SOS utilizes OpenFlow to redirect application specific traffic to application specific service agents. SOS uses service agents on both ends of the connection to seamlessly terminate a user's TCP connection, launch a set of parallel TCP connections, and leverage multiple paths when available to maximize throughput.
     1348</li>
     1349<br>
     1350
     1351
     1352
     1353<li>
    13411354<b>Rosen, Aaron and Wang, Kuang-Ching</b>
    13421355, &quot;Steroid OpenFlow Service: Seamless Network Service Delivery in Software Defined Networks.&quot;
     
    18511864<li>
    18521865<b>Selvadhurai, Arunprasaath</b>
    1853 , &quot;Network Measurement Tool Components for Enabling Performance Intelligence within Cloud-based Applications.&quot;
     1866, &quot;Network Measurement Tool Components for Enabling Performance Intelligence within Cloud-based Applications (Master's Thesis).&quot;
    18541867
    185518682013.
     
    19541967
    19551968<li>
     1969<b>Xiao, Zhifeng and Fu, Bo and Xiao, Yang and Chen, C. L. Philip and Liang, Wei</b>
     1970, &quot;A review of GENI authentication and access control mechanisms.&quot;
     1971International Journal of Security and Networks,
     19722013.
     1973doi:10.1504/ijsn.2013.055046.
     1974<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1504/ijsn.2013.055046">http://dx.doi.org/10.1504/ijsn.2013.055046</a>
     1975<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The purpose of this paper is to investigate the authentication and access control mechanisms for Global Environment Network Innovation (GENI). First, we will deliver an extensive survey of the existing authentication and access control techniques in general. We will then study how authentication and access control policies of GENI projects are implemented and how these mechanisms are integrated into the project control frameworks. Finally, we will summarise the advantages and disadvantages of the authentication and access control methods employed in GENI. We believe that the given review is valuable to those who are interested in the internal design of the current GENI security mechanisms.
     1976</li>
     1977<br>
     1978
     1979
     1980
     1981<li>
    19561982<b>Xing, Tianyi and Huang, Dijiang and Xu, Le and Chung, Chun-Jen and Khatkar, P.</b>
    19571983, &quot;SnortFlow: A OpenFlow-Based Intrusion Prevention System in Cloud Environment.&quot;
     
    24922518<li>
    24932519<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     2520, &quot;Creating environments for innovation: Designing and implementing advanced experimental network research testbeds based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility and the StarLight Exchange.&quot;
     2521Computer Networks,
     25222014.
     2523doi:10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024.
     2524<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024">http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024</a>
     2525<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Large scale national and international experimental research environments are required to advance communication services and supporting network architecture, technology, and infrastructure. Theories and concepts are often explored using simulation and modeling techniques within labs or on small scale testbeds. However, while such testbeds are valuable resources for the research process, these facilities alone cannot provide an appropriate approximation of the real world conditions required to explore ideas at scale. Very large scale global, experimental network research capabilities are required to deeply investigate innovative concepts. For many years, network testbeds were created to address fairly specific, well defined, limited research goals, and they were implemented for fairly short periods. Recently, taking advantage of a number of macro information technology trends, such as virtualization and programmable resources, several network research communities have been developing innovative types of network research environments. Instead of designing traditional network testbeds, research communities are designing large scale, highly flexible distributed platforms that can be used to create many different types of testbeds. Also, rather than creating short term testbeds for limited research objectives, these new environments are being designed as long term persistent resources to support many types of experimental research. This paper describes the motivations for this trend, provides several examples of large scale distributed network research environments based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility (GLIF) and the StarLight Exchange Facility, including the Global Environment for Network Innovation (GENI), and indicates emerging future trends for these types of environments.
     2526</li>
     2527<br>
     2528
     2529<li>
     2530<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    24942531, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot;
    24952532Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
     
    25012538<br>
    25022539
    2503 <li>
    2504 <b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    2505 , &quot;Creating environments for innovation: Designing and implementing advanced experimental network research testbeds based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility and the StarLight Exchange.&quot;
    2506 Computer Networks,
    2507 2014.
    2508 doi:10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024.
    2509 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024">http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024</a>
    2510 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Large scale national and international experimental research environments are required to advance communication services and supporting network architecture, technology, and infrastructure. Theories and concepts are often explored using simulation and modeling techniques within labs or on small scale testbeds. However, while such testbeds are valuable resources for the research process, these facilities alone cannot provide an appropriate approximation of the real world conditions required to explore ideas at scale. Very large scale global, experimental network research capabilities are required to deeply investigate innovative concepts. For many years, network testbeds were created to address fairly specific, well defined, limited research goals, and they were implemented for fairly short periods. Recently, taking advantage of a number of macro information technology trends, such as virtualization and programmable resources, several network research communities have been developing innovative types of network research environments. Instead of designing traditional network testbeds, research communities are designing large scale, highly flexible distributed platforms that can be used to create many different types of testbeds. Also, rather than creating short term testbeds for limited research objectives, these new environments are being designed as long term persistent resources to support many types of experimental research. This paper describes the motivations for this trend, provides several examples of large scale distributed network research environments based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility (GLIF) and the StarLight Exchange Facility, including the Global Environment for Network Innovation (GENI), and indicates emerging future trends for these types of environments.
    2511 </li>
    2512 <br>
    2513 
    25142540
    25152541
     
    30633089
    30643090<li>
     3091<b>Alaoui, Sara E. and Palusa, Saichand and Ramamurthy, Byrav</b>
     3092, &quot;The Interplanetary Internet Implemented on the GENI Testbed.&quot;
     30932015 IEEE Global Communications Conference (GLOBECOM), IEEE,
     30942015.
     3095doi:10.1109/glocom.2014.7417313.
     3096<a href="http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?tp=&#x0026;&#x0023;38;arnumber=7417313&#x0026;&#x0023;38;isnumber=7416057">http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?tp=&#x0026;&#x0023;38;arnumber=7417313&#x0026;&#x0023;38;isnumber=7416057</a>
     3097<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Interplanetary Internet or Interplanetary Networking is envisaged as a space network which interconnects spacecrafts, satellites, rovers and orbiters of different planets and comets for efficient exchange of scientific data such as telemetry and images. In this paper, we implement a layout of the Interplanetary Internet (IPN) with the Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) software module that uses Contact Graph Routing (CGR). The experiments are then implemented on the Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) testbed. Along with realistic contact plans (CP) of the nodes, this network implementation was used to run experiments testing the performance of Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN) with and without cross links between Mars orbiters. The experiments showed that in an Earth-Mars communication network using two Mars orbiters, allowing cross links between the orbiters results in increasing the amount of data transferred by roughly 9.2&#x0025;. Data sent from Mars Rover to the Earth stations also increases by 35.7&#x0025; when a third satellite (Mars Express) was added to the network without cross links. Finally, when cross links are allowed across all satellites orbiting Mars and serving as relay nodes between the Earth stations and Mars rover, the communication was enhanced by almost 46&#x0025;. We conclude that by adding cross links, the performance of the network is enhanced for a better transmission of data from Mars to the Earth, which is very pertinent for the scalability of the network.
     3098</li>
     3099<br>
     3100
     3101
     3102
     3103<li>
     3104<b>Bashir, Sadia and Ahmed, Nadeem</b>
     3105, &quot;VirtMonE: Efficient detection of elephant flows in virtualized data centers.&quot;
     3106Telecommunication Networks and Applications Conference (ITNAC), 2015 International, IEEE,
     31072015.
     3108doi:10.1109/atnac.2015.7366826.
     3109<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/atnac.2015.7366826">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/atnac.2015.7366826</a>
     3110<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>A modern virtualized data center is highly multifarious environment shared among hundreds of co-located tenants hosting heterogeneous applications. The tenants' virtual machines generate a subset of elephants or mice flows (different in terms of rate, size, duration, and burstiness) based on the type of application they are running. Virtual traffic generated from the tenant's virtual machines traverses the underlay physical fabric in aggregate because of different encapsulation techniques (VXLAN, NVGRE, and STT for example) employed in data center networks thus obfuscating the virtual traffic characteristics. Existing approaches to monitor and/or identify elephant flows either have limited or no visibility into virtual traffic or are associated with high monitoring overhead making it hard to precisely detect and properly engineer elephant flows on the underlay fabric. In this paper, we present VirtMonE, a lightweight detection mechanism aimed at precisely detecting egress elephant flows at Open vSwitch while providing visibility into virtual traffic with least measurement and monitoring overhead at the edge. We conduct simulations on a small GENI testbed to evaluate the performance of the proposed solution for a software-defined multi-tenant virtual network. Our proposed solution is demonstrated to precisely detect the elephant flows from different tenants at the edge, provide visibility into virtual traffic and mitigate the network overhead associated with detection, thus improving the overall performance of the data centre.
     3111</li>
     3112<br>
     3113
     3114
     3115
     3116<li>
    30653117<b>Berman, Mark and Demeester, Piet and Lee, Jae W. and Nagaraja, Kiran and Zink, Michael and Colle, Didier and Krishnappa, Dilip K. and Raychaudhuri, Dipankar and Schulzrinne, Henning and Seskar, Ivan and Sharma, Sachin</b>
    30663118, &quot;Future Internets Escape the Simulator.&quot;
     
    31283180
    31293181<li>
     3182<b>Calyam, Prasad and Mishra, Anup and Antequera, Ronny B. and Chemodanov, Dmitrii and Berryman, Alex and Zhu, Kunpeng and Abbott, Carmen and Skubic, Marjorie</b>
     3183, &quot;Synchronous Big Data analytics for personalized and remote physical therapy.&quot;
     3184Pervasive and Mobile Computing,
     31852015.
     3186doi:10.1016/j.pmcj.2015.09.004.
     3187<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pmcj.2015.09.004">http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pmcj.2015.09.004</a>
     3188<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>With gigabit networking becoming economically feasible and widely installed at homes, there are new opportunities to revisit in-home, personalized telehealth services. In this paper, we describe a novel telehealth eldercare service that we developed viz., ” PhysicalTherapy-as-a-Service” (PTaaS) that connects a remote physical therapist at a clinic to a senior at home. The service leverages a high-speed, low-latency network connection through an interactive interface built on top of Microsoft Kinect motion sensing capabilities. The interface that is built using user-centered design principles for wellness coaching exercises is essentially a 'Synchronous Big Data' application due to its: (i) high data-in-motion velocity (i.e., peak data rate is ≈400 Mbps), (ii) considerable variety (i.e., measurements include 3D sensing, network health, user opinion surveys and video clips of RGB, skeletal and depth data), and (iii) large volume (i.e., several GB of measurement data for a simple exercise activity). The successful PTaaS delivery through this interface is dependent on the veracity analytics needed for correlation of the real-time Big Data streams within a session, in order to assess exercise balance of the senior without any bias due to network quality effects. Our experiments with PTaaS in an actual testbed involving senior homes in Kansas City with Google Fiber connections and our university clinic demonstrate the network configuration and time synchronization related challenges in order to perform online analytics. Our findings provide insights on how to: (a) enable suitable resource calibration and perform network troubleshooting for high user experience for both the therapist and the senior, and (b) realize a Big Data architecture for PTaaS and other similar personalized healthcare services to be remotely delivered at a large-scale in a reliable, secure and cost-effective manner.
     3189</li>
     3190<br>
     3191
     3192
     3193
     3194<li>
    31303195<b>Chen, Xinming and Wolf, Tilman and Griffioen, Jim and Ascigil, Onur and Dutta, Rudra and Rouskas, George and Bhat, Shireesh and Baldin, Ilya and Calvert, Ken</b>
    31313196, &quot;Design of a protocol to enable economic transactions for network services.&quot;
     
    31423207<li>
    31433208<b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
     3209, &quot;An SDN-supported collaborative approach for DDoS flooding detection and containment.&quot;
     3210Military Communications Conference, MILCOM 2015 - 2015 IEEE, IEEE,
     32112015.
     3212doi:10.1109/milcom.2015.7357519.
     3213<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/milcom.2015.7357519">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/milcom.2015.7357519</a>
     3214<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Networking (SDN) has the potential to enable novel security applications that support flexible, on-demand deployment of system elements. It can offer targeted forensic evidence collection and investigation of computer network attacks. Such unique capabilities are instrumental to network intrusion detection that is challenged by large volumes of data and complex network topologies. This paper presents an innovative approach that coordinates distributed network traffic Monitors and attack Correlators supported by Open Virtual Switches (OVS). The Monitors conduct anomaly detection and the Correlators perform deep packet inspection for attack signature recognition. These elements take advantage of complementary views and information availability on both the data and control planes. Moreover, they collaboratively look for network flooding attack signature constituents that possess different characteristics in the level of information abstraction. Therefore, this approach is able to not only quickly raise an alert against potential threats, but also follow it up with careful verification to reduce false alarms. We experiment with this SDN-supported collaborative approach to detect TCP SYN flood attacks on the Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI), a realistic virtual testbed. The response times and detection accuracy, in the context of a small to medium corporate network, have demonstrated its effectiveness and scalability.
     3215</li>
     3216<br>
     3217
     3218<li>
     3219<b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    31443220, &quot;Selective Packet Inspection to Detect DoS Flooding Using Software Defined Networking (SDN).&quot;
    31453221Distributed Computing Systems Workshops (ICDCSW), 2015 IEEE 35th International Conference on, IEEE,
     
    31513227<br>
    31523228
    3153 <li>
    3154 <b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    3155 , &quot;An SDN-supported collaborative approach for DDoS flooding detection and containment.&quot;
    3156 Military Communications Conference, MILCOM 2015 - 2015 IEEE, IEEE,
    3157 2015.
    3158 doi:10.1109/milcom.2015.7357519.
    3159 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/milcom.2015.7357519">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/milcom.2015.7357519</a>
    3160 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Networking (SDN) has the potential to enable novel security applications that support flexible, on-demand deployment of system elements. It can offer targeted forensic evidence collection and investigation of computer network attacks. Such unique capabilities are instrumental to network intrusion detection that is challenged by large volumes of data and complex network topologies. This paper presents an innovative approach that coordinates distributed network traffic Monitors and attack Correlators supported by Open Virtual Switches (OVS). The Monitors conduct anomaly detection and the Correlators perform deep packet inspection for attack signature recognition. These elements take advantage of complementary views and information availability on both the data and control planes. Moreover, they collaboratively look for network flooding attack signature constituents that possess different characteristics in the level of information abstraction. Therefore, this approach is able to not only quickly raise an alert against potential threats, but also follow it up with careful verification to reduce false alarms. We experiment with this SDN-supported collaborative approach to detect TCP SYN flood attacks on the Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI), a realistic virtual testbed. The response times and detection accuracy, in the context of a small to medium corporate network, have demonstrated its effectiveness and scalability.
    3161 </li>
    3162 <br>
    3163 
    31643229
    31653230
     
    31923257<li>
    31933258<b>El Alaoui, Sara</b>
    3194 , &quot;Routing Optimization in Interplanetary Networks.&quot;
     3259, &quot;Routing Optimization in Interplanetary Networks (Master's Thesis).&quot;
    31953260
    319632612015.
     
    38513916<li>
    38523917<b>Yuen, Marco</b>
    3853 , &quot;GENI in the Cloud.&quot
     3918, &quot;GENI in the Cloud (Master's Thesis).&quot
    38543919
    385539202010.
     
    46154680
    46164681<li>
     4682<b>Rosen, Aaron</b>
     4683, &quot;Network Service Delivery and Throughput Optimization via Software Defined Networking (Master's Thesis).&quot
     4684
     46852012.
     4686
     4687</li>
     4688<br>
     4689
     4690
     4691
     4692<li>
    46174693<b>Rosen, Aaron and Wang, Kuang-Ching</b>
    46184694, &quot;Steroid OpenFlow Service: Seamless Network Service Delivery in Software Defined Networks.&quot
     
    50495125<li>
    50505126<b>Selvadhurai, Arunprasaath</b>
    5051 , &quot;Network Measurement Tool Components for Enabling Performance Intelligence within Cloud-based Applications.&quot
     5127, &quot;Network Measurement Tool Components for Enabling Performance Intelligence within Cloud-based Applications (Master's Thesis).&quot
    50525128
    505351292013.
     
    51365212
    51375213<li>
     5214<b>Xiao, Zhifeng and Fu, Bo and Xiao, Yang and Chen, C. L. Philip and Liang, Wei</b>
     5215, &quot;A review of GENI authentication and access control mechanisms.&quot
     5216International Journal of Security and Networks,
     52172013.
     5218doi:10.1504/ijsn.2013.055046.
     5219</li>
     5220<br>
     5221
     5222
     5223
     5224<li>
    51385225<b>Xing, Tianyi and Huang, Dijiang and Xu, Le and Chung, Chun-Jen and Khatkar, P.</b>
    51395226, &quot;SnortFlow: A OpenFlow-Based Intrusion Prevention System in Cloud Environment.&quot
     
    55925679<li>
    55935680<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     5681, &quot;Creating environments for innovation: Designing and implementing advanced experimental network research testbeds based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility and the StarLight Exchange.&quot
     5682Computer Networks,
     56832014.
     5684doi:10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024.
     5685</li>
     5686<br>
     5687
     5688<li>
     5689<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    55945690, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot
    55955691Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
    559656922014.
    55975693doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932970.
    5598 </li>
    5599 <br>
    5600 
    5601 <li>
    5602 <b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    5603 , &quot;Creating environments for innovation: Designing and implementing advanced experimental network research testbeds based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility and the StarLight Exchange.&quot
    5604 Computer Networks,
    5605 2014.
    5606 doi:10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024.
    56075694</li>
    56085695<br>
     
    60756162
    60766163<li>
     6164<b>Alaoui, Sara E. and Palusa, Saichand and Ramamurthy, Byrav</b>
     6165, &quot;The Interplanetary Internet Implemented on the GENI Testbed.&quot
     61662015 IEEE Global Communications Conference (GLOBECOM), IEEE,
     61672015.
     6168doi:10.1109/glocom.2014.7417313.
     6169</li>
     6170<br>
     6171
     6172
     6173
     6174<li>
     6175<b>Bashir, Sadia and Ahmed, Nadeem</b>
     6176, &quot;VirtMonE: Efficient detection of elephant flows in virtualized data centers.&quot
     6177Telecommunication Networks and Applications Conference (ITNAC), 2015 International, IEEE,
     61782015.
     6179doi:10.1109/atnac.2015.7366826.
     6180</li>
     6181<br>
     6182
     6183
     6184
     6185<li>
    60776186<b>Berman, Mark and Demeester, Piet and Lee, Jae W. and Nagaraja, Kiran and Zink, Michael and Colle, Didier and Krishnappa, Dilip K. and Raychaudhuri, Dipankar and Schulzrinne, Henning and Seskar, Ivan and Sharma, Sachin</b>
    60786187, &quot;Future Internets Escape the Simulator.&quot
     
    61306239
    61316240<li>
     6241<b>Calyam, Prasad and Mishra, Anup and Antequera, Ronny B. and Chemodanov, Dmitrii and Berryman, Alex and Zhu, Kunpeng and Abbott, Carmen and Skubic, Marjorie</b>
     6242, &quot;Synchronous Big Data analytics for personalized and remote physical therapy.&quot
     6243Pervasive and Mobile Computing,
     62442015.
     6245doi:10.1016/j.pmcj.2015.09.004.
     6246</li>
     6247<br>
     6248
     6249
     6250
     6251<li>
    61326252<b>Chen, Xinming and Wolf, Tilman and Griffioen, Jim and Ascigil, Onur and Dutta, Rudra and Rouskas, George and Bhat, Shireesh and Baldin, Ilya and Calvert, Ken</b>
    61336253, &quot;Design of a protocol to enable economic transactions for network services.&quot
     
    61426262<li>
    61436263<b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
     6264, &quot;An SDN-supported collaborative approach for DDoS flooding detection and containment.&quot
     6265Military Communications Conference, MILCOM 2015 - 2015 IEEE, IEEE,
     62662015.
     6267doi:10.1109/milcom.2015.7357519.
     6268</li>
     6269<br>
     6270
     6271<li>
     6272<b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    61446273, &quot;Selective Packet Inspection to Detect DoS Flooding Using Software Defined Networking (SDN).&quot
    61456274Distributed Computing Systems Workshops (ICDCSW), 2015 IEEE 35th International Conference on, IEEE,
    614662752015.
    61476276doi:10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27.
    6148 </li>
    6149 <br>
    6150 
    6151 <li>
    6152 <b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    6153 , &quot;An SDN-supported collaborative approach for DDoS flooding detection and containment.&quot
    6154 Military Communications Conference, MILCOM 2015 - 2015 IEEE, IEEE,
    6155 2015.
    6156 doi:10.1109/milcom.2015.7357519.
    61576277</li>
    61586278<br>
     
    61846304<li>
    61856305<b>El Alaoui, Sara</b>
    6186 , &quot;Routing Optimization in Interplanetary Networks.&quot
     6306, &quot;Routing Optimization in Interplanetary Networks (Master's Thesis).&quot
    61876307
    618863082015.