Changes between Version 29 and Version 30 of GENIBibliography


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Timestamp:
08/31/15 15:48:10 (7 years ago)
Author:
Mark Berman
Comment:

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  • GENIBibliography

    v29 v30  
    479479
    480480<li>
     481<b>Bassett, Ethan K. and Choffnes, David R. and Cunha, &#x49;&#x0301;talo and Scott, Colin and Anderson, Thomas and Krishnamurthy, Arvind</b>
     482, &quot;Machiavellian Routing: Improving Internet Availability with BGP Poisoning.&quot;
     483Proceedings of the 10th ACM Workshop on Hot Topics in Networks, Cambridge, Massachusetts, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     4842011.
     485doi:10.1145/2070562.2070573.
     486<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2070562.2070573">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2070562.2070573</a>
     487<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>We propose a new approach to mitigate disruptions of Internet connectivity. The Internet was designed to always find a route if there is a policy-compliant path; however, in many cases, connectivity is disrupted despite the existence of an underlying valid path. The research community has done considerable work on this problem, much of it focused on short-term outages that occur during route convergence. There has been less progress on addressing avoidable long-lasting outages. Our measurements show that long-lasting events contribute significantly to overall unavailability. To address these long-term problems, we develop a system, Machiavellian routing, for automatic failure remediation, centered around the use of BGP poisoning. With poisoning, an edge network can cause other networks to send traffic to it via paths that avoid a problem in a particular transit ISP. We describe the key challenges to using poisoning to improve Internet connectivity, and we develop a set of techniques to use it predictably, accurately, and effectively.
     488</li>
     489<br>
     490
     491
     492
     493<li>
    481494<b>Bhanage, Gautam and Seskar, Ivan and Zhang, Yanyong and Raychaudhuri, Dipankar and Jain, Shweta</b>
    482495, &quot;Experimental Evaluation of OpenVZ from a Testbed Deployment Perspective.&quot;
     
    886899
    887900<li>
     901<b>Bassett, Ethan K. and Scott, Colin and Choffnes, David R. and Cunha, &#x49;&#x0301;talo and Valancius, Vytautas and Feamster, Nick and Madhyastha, Harsha V. and Anderson, Thomas and Krishnamurthy, Arvind</b>
     902, &quot;LIFEGUARD: Practical Repair of Persistent Route Failures.&quot;
     903Proceedings of the ACM SIGCOMM 2012 conference, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     9042012.
     905doi:10.1145/2377677.2377756.
     906<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2377677.2377756">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2377677.2377756</a>
     907<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The Internet was designed to always find a route if there is a policy-compliant path. However, in many cases, connectivity is disrupted despite the existence of an underlying valid path. The research community has focused on short-term outages that occur during route convergence. There has been less progress on addressing avoidable long-lasting outages. Our measurements show that long-lasting events contribute significantly to overall unavailability. To address these problems, we develop LIFEGUARD, a system for automatic failure localization and remediation. LIFEGUARD uses active measurements and a historical path atlas to locate faults, even in the presence of asymmetric paths and failures. Given the ability to locate faults, we argue that the Internet protocols should allow edge ISPs to steer traffic to them around failures, without requiring the involvement of the network causing the failure. Although the Internet does not explicitly support this functionality today, we show how to approximate it using carefully crafted BGP messages. LIFEGUARD employs a set of techniques to reroute around failures with low impact on working routes. Deploying LIFEGUARD on the Internet, we find that it can effectively route traffic around an AS without causing widespread disruption.
     908</li>
     909<br>
     910
     911
     912
     913<li>
    888914<b>Bavier, Andy and Coady, Yvonne and Mack, Tony and Matthews, Chris and Mambretti, Joe and McGeer, Rick and Mueller, Paul and Snoeren, Alex and Yuen, Marco</b>
    889915, &quot;GENICloud and transcloud.&quot;
     
    16031629
    16041630<li>
     1631<b>Javed, Umar and Cunha, Italo and Choffnes, David and Bassett, Ethan K. and Anderson, Thomas and Krishnamurthy, Arvind</b>
     1632, &quot;PoiRoot: Investigating the Root Cause of Interdomain Path Changes.&quot;
     1633Proceedings of the ACM SIGCOMM 2013 conference, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     16342013.
     1635doi:10.1145/2486001.2486036.
     1636<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2486001.2486036">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2486001.2486036</a>
     1637<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Interdomain path changes occur frequently. Because routing protocols expose insufficient information to reason about all changes, the general problem of identifying the root cause remains unsolved. In this work, we design and evaluate PoiRoot, a real-time system that allows a provider to accurately isolate the root cause (the network responsible) of path changes affecting its prefixes. First, we develop a new model describing path changes and use it to provably identify the set of all potentially responsible networks. Next, we develop a recursive algorithm that accurately isolates the root cause of any path change. We observe that the algorithm requires monitoring paths that are generally not visible using standard measurement tools. To address this limitation, we combine existing measurement tools in new ways to acquire path information required for isolating the root cause of a path change. We evaluate PoiRoot on path changes obtained through controlled Internet experiments, simulations, and &#x69;&#x0308;n-the-wild&#x20;&#x0308;measurements. We demonstrate that PoiRoot is highly accurate, works well even with partial information, and generally narrows down the root cause to a single network or two neighboring ones. On controlled experiments PoiRoot is 100&#x0025; accurate, as opposed to prior work which is accurate only 61.7&#x0025; of the time.
     1638</li>
     1639<br>
     1640
     1641
     1642
     1643<li>
    16051644<b>Jin, Ruofan and Wang, Bing</b>
    16061645, &quot;Malware Detection for Mobile Devices Using Software-Defined Networking.&quot;
     
    18501889
    18511890<li>
     1891<b>Valancius, Vytautas and Ravi, Bharath and Feamster, Nick and Snoeren, Alex C.</b>
     1892, &quot;Quantifying the benefits of joint content and network routing.&quot;
     1893Proceedings of the ACM SIGMETRICS/international conference on Measurement and modeling of computer systems - SIGMETRICS '13, Pittsburgh, PA, USA, ACM Press,
     18942013.
     1895doi:10.1145/2465529.2465762.
     1896<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2465529.2465762">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2465529.2465762</a>
     1897<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Online service providers aim to provide good performance for an increasingly diverse set of applications and services. One of the most effective ways to improve service performance is to replicate the service closer to the end users. Replication alone, however, has its limits: while operators can replicate static content, wide-scale replication of dynamic content is not always feasible or cost effective. To improve the latency of such services many operators turn to Internet traffic engineering. In this paper, we study the benefits of performing replica-to-end-user mappings in conjunction with active Internet traffic engineering. We present the design of PECAN, a system that controls both the selection of replicas (&#x63;&#x0308;ontent routing&#x29;&#x0308; and the routes between the clients and their associated replicas (&#x6e;&#x0308;etwork routing&#x29;&#x0308;. We emulate a replicated service that can perform both content and network routing by deploying PECAN on a distributed testbed. In our testbed, we see that jointly performing content and network routing can reduce round-trip latency by 4.3&#x0025; on average over performing content routing alone (potentially reducing service response times by tens of milliseconds or more) and that most of these gains can be realized with no more than five alternate routes at each replica.
     1898</li>
     1899<br>
     1900
     1901
     1902
     1903<li>
    18521904<b>Wang, Yuefeng and Esposito, F. and Matta, I.</b>
    18531905, &quot;Demonstrating RINA Using the GENI Testbed.&quot;
     
    24012453<li>
    24022454<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     2455, &quot;Creating environments for innovation: Designing and implementing advanced experimental network research testbeds based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility and the StarLight Exchange.&quot;
     2456Computer Networks,
     24572014.
     2458doi:10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024.
     2459<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024">http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024</a>
     2460<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Large scale national and international experimental research environments are required to advance communication services and supporting network architecture, technology, and infrastructure. Theories and concepts are often explored using simulation and modeling techniques within labs or on small scale testbeds. However, while such testbeds are valuable resources for the research process, these facilities alone cannot provide an appropriate approximation of the real world conditions required to explore ideas at scale. Very large scale global, experimental network research capabilities are required to deeply investigate innovative concepts. For many years, network testbeds were created to address fairly specific, well defined, limited research goals, and they were implemented for fairly short periods. Recently, taking advantage of a number of macro information technology trends, such as virtualization and programmable resources, several network research communities have been developing innovative types of network research environments. Instead of designing traditional network testbeds, research communities are designing large scale, highly flexible distributed platforms that can be used to create many different types of testbeds. Also, rather than creating short term testbeds for limited research objectives, these new environments are being designed as long term persistent resources to support many types of experimental research. This paper describes the motivations for this trend, provides several examples of large scale distributed network research environments based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility (GLIF) and the StarLight Exchange Facility, including the Global Environment for Network Innovation (GENI), and indicates emerging future trends for these types of environments.
     2461</li>
     2462<br>
     2463
     2464<li>
     2465<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    24032466, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot;
    24042467Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
     
    24102473<br>
    24112474
    2412 <li>
    2413 <b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    2414 , &quot;Creating environments for innovation: Designing and implementing advanced experimental network research testbeds based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility and the StarLight Exchange.&quot;
    2415 Computer Networks,
    2416 2014.
    2417 doi:10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024.
    2418 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024">http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024</a>
    2419 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Large scale national and international experimental research environments are required to advance communication services and supporting network architecture, technology, and infrastructure. Theories and concepts are often explored using simulation and modeling techniques within labs or on small scale testbeds. However, while such testbeds are valuable resources for the research process, these facilities alone cannot provide an appropriate approximation of the real world conditions required to explore ideas at scale. Very large scale global, experimental network research capabilities are required to deeply investigate innovative concepts. For many years, network testbeds were created to address fairly specific, well defined, limited research goals, and they were implemented for fairly short periods. Recently, taking advantage of a number of macro information technology trends, such as virtualization and programmable resources, several network research communities have been developing innovative types of network research environments. Instead of designing traditional network testbeds, research communities are designing large scale, highly flexible distributed platforms that can be used to create many different types of testbeds. Also, rather than creating short term testbeds for limited research objectives, these new environments are being designed as long term persistent resources to support many types of experimental research. This paper describes the motivations for this trend, provides several examples of large scale distributed network research environments based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility (GLIF) and the StarLight Exchange Facility, including the Global Environment for Network Innovation (GENI), and indicates emerging future trends for these types of environments.
    2420 </li>
    2421 <br>
    2422 
    24232475
    24242476
     
    25412593
    25422594<li>
     2595<b>Peter, Simon and Javed, Umar and Zhang, Qiao and Woos, Doug and Anderson, Thomas and Krishnamurthy, Arvind</b>
     2596, &quot;One tunnel is (often) enough.&quot;
     2597Proceedings of the ACM SIGCOMM 2014 conference, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     25982014.
     2599doi:10.1145/2740070.2626318.
     2600<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2740070.2626318">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2740070.2626318</a>
     2601<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>A longstanding problem with the Internet is that it is vulnerable to outages, black holes, hijacking and denial of service. Although architectural solutions have been proposed to address many of these issues, they have had difficulty being adopted due to the need for widespread adoption before most users would see any benefit. This is especially relevant as the Internet is increasingly used for applications where correct and continuous operation is essential. In this paper, we study whether a simple, easy to implement model is sufficient for addressing the aforementioned Internet vulnerabilities. Our model, called ARROW (Advertised Reliable Routing Over Waypoints), is designed to allow users to configure reliable and secure end to end paths through participating providers. With ARROW, a highly reliable ISP offers tunneled transit through its network, along with packet transformation at the ingress, as a service to remote paying customers. Those customers can stitch together reliable end to end paths through a combination of participating and non-participating ISPs in order to improve the fault-tolerance, robustness, and security of mission critical transmissions. Unlike efforts to redesign the Internet from scratch, we show that ARROW can address a set of well-known Internet vulnerabilities, for most users, with the adoption of only a single transit ISP. To demonstrate ARROW, we have added it to a small-scale wide-area ISP we control. We evaluate its performance and failure recovery properties in both simulation and live settings.
     2602</li>
     2603<br>
     2604
     2605
     2606
     2607<li>
    25432608<b>Qiu, Chenxi and Shen, Haiying</b>
    25442609, &quot;A Delaunay-Based Coordinate-Free Mechanism for Full Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks.&quot;
     
    26132678<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.86">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.86</a>
    26142679<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Multi-tenant cloud infrastructures are increasingly used for high-performance and high-throughput domain science applications. In recent years, machine virtualization has come a long way toward supporting domain science applications. Various cloud platforms, such as Open Stack, Cloud Stack, and Amazon EC2 are attracting scientists to these platforms with the promise of customized environments with virtually infinite compute resources. At the same time, research efforts, such as NSF GENI are bringing together cloud computing with advanced network infrastructure provisioning. This paper presents work toward evaluating the use of GENI to support domain science applications. The evaluation involved two different domain science applications deployed on ExoGENI and Insta GENI. The first application is ADCIRC, a storm surge model that uses Message Passing Interface (MPI). The second is Motif network, a genomics application using the Pegasus workflow management system to manage a large data-intensive workflow.
     2680</li>
     2681<br>
     2682
     2683
     2684
     2685<li>
     2686<b>Schlinker, Brandon and Zarifis, Kyriakos and Cunha, Italo and Feamster, Nick and Bassett, Ethan K.</b>
     2687, &quot;PEERING: An AS for Us.&quot;
     2688Proceedings of the 13th ACM Workshop on Hot Topics in Networks, Los Angeles, CA, USA, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     26892014.
     2690doi:10.1145/2670518.2673887.
     2691<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2670518.2673887">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2670518.2673887</a>
     2692<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Internet routing suffers from persistent and transient failures, circuitous routes, oscillations, and prefix hijacks. A major impediment to progress is the lack of ways to conduct impactful interdomain research. Most research is based either on passive observation of existing routes, keeping researchers from assessing how the Internet will respond to route or policy changes; or simulations, which are restricted by limitations in our understanding of topology and policy. We propose a new class of interdomain research: researchers can instantiate an AS of their choice, including its intradomain topology and interdomain interconnectivity, and connect it with the &#x6c;&#x0308;ive&#x20;&#x0308;Internet to exchange routes and traffic with real interdomain neighbors. Instead of being observers of the Internet ecosystem, researchers become members. Towards this end, we present the Peering testbed. In its nascent stage, the testbed has proven extremely useful, resulting in a series of studies that were nearly impossible for researchers to conduct in the past. In this paper, we present a vision of what the testbed can provide. We sketch how to extend the testbed to enable future innovation, taking advantage of the rise of IXPs to expand our testbed.
    26152693</li>
    26162694<br>
     
    29202998
    29212999<li>
     3000<b>Bhat, Divyashri and Wang, Cong and Rizk, Amr and Zink, Michael</b>
     3001, &quot;A load balancing approach for adaptive bitrate streaming in Information Centric networks.&quot;
     3002Multimedia &#x0026; Expo Workshops (ICMEW), 2015 IEEE International Conference on, IEEE,
     30032015.
     3004doi:10.1109/icmew.2015.7169802.
     3005<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icmew.2015.7169802">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icmew.2015.7169802</a>
     3006<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The Information Centric Networking (ICN) paradigm promises deconstraining the current Internet architecture by allowing clients to directly address the desired content throughout the network. For the Internet this is a further evolutionary step from the idea of a narrow-waist core that only transports requests/replies to an intelligent architecture searching for and providing content. Multi-sourcing, which is one of the core ideas of ICN, constitutes a serious challenge for prevalent Internet applications such as video streaming. In this work we show how prominent adaptive video streaming protocols can benefit from the load balancing capabilities that are native to ICN. We examine the performance of content retrieval in ICN over Ethernet in a real-world testbed showing the impact of multi-sourcing and content size variation on the content transfer times.
     3007</li>
     3008<br>
     3009
     3010
     3011
     3012<li>
     3013<b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
     3014, &quot;Selective Packet Inspection to Detect DoS Flooding Using Software Defined Networking (SDN).&quot;
     3015Distributed Computing Systems Workshops (ICDCSW), 2015 IEEE 35th International Conference on, IEEE,
     30162015.
     3017doi:10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27.
     3018<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27</a>
     3019<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software-defined networking (SDN) and Open Flow have been driving new security applications and services. However, even if some of these studies provide interesting visions of what can be achieved, they stop short of presenting realistic application scenarios and experimental results. In this paper, we discuss a novel attack detection approach that coordinates monitors distributed over a network and controllers centralized on an SDN Open Virtual Switch (OVS), selectively inspecting network packets on demand. With different scale of network views and information availability, these two elements collaboratively detect signature constituents of an attack. Therefore, this approach is able to quickly issue an alert against potential threats followed by careful verification for high accuracy, while balancing the workload on the OVS. We have applied this method for detection and mitigation of TCP SYN flood attacks on Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI). This realistic experimentation has provided us with insightful findings helpful toward a systematic methodology of SDN-supported attack detection and containment.
     3020</li>
     3021<br>
     3022
     3023
     3024
     3025<li>
    29223026<b>Edwards, Sarah and Liu, Xuan and Riga, Niky</b>
    29233027, &quot;Creating Repeatable Computer Science and Networking Experiments on Shared, Public Testbeds.&quot;
     
    30243128
    30253129<li>
     3130<b>Rivera and Fei, Zongming and Griffioen, James</b>
     3131, &quot;Providing a High Level Abstraction for SDN Networks in GENI.&quot;
     3132Distributed Computing Systems Workshops (ICDCSW), 2015 IEEE 35th International Conference on, IEEE,
     31332015.
     3134doi:10.1109/icdcsw.2015.22.
     3135<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.22">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.22</a>
     3136<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Networks make it possible to decouple routing from forwarding, allowing the routing decisions to be made by a (logically)centralized controller which are then communicated to the switches in the network (for example, via the Open Flow protocol). One problem facing end users is the need to map high level abstractions -- like the path a flow should take -- to a set of low level forwarding rules tailored to, and installed at, every switch along the path. Installing such rules manually is tedious and error prone, and writing a controller program to do it is equally, if not more, challenging. In this paper, we propose a new set of tools that allow users (experimenters)to easily map their high level routing policies to low level Open Flow rules, and to help users reverse engineer high level policies from the installed set of low level flow rules. The tools provide users with the abstraction of end-to-end flows that users can install, list, and delete. The tools automatically handle the details of computing and installing all the rules needed to implement end-to-end flows, and are also capable of identifying flows and, if desired, removing flows that already exist. The tools have been implemented as modules in the GENI Desktop providing users with a graphical interface to their flows. In addition, we have implemented a module to monitor the performance of flows that have been installed. We describe our prototype implementation and present performance numbers obtained via the service.
     3137</li>
     3138<br>
     3139
     3140
     3141
     3142<li>
     3143<b>Sun, Peng and Vanbever, Laurent and Rexford, Jennifer</b>
     3144, &quot;Scalable Programmable Inbound Traffic Engineering.&quot;
     3145Proceedings of the 1st ACM SIGCOMM Symposium on Software Defined Networking Research, Santa Clara, California, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     31462015.
     3147doi:10.1145/2774993.2775063.
     3148<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2774993.2775063">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2774993.2775063</a>
     3149<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>With the rise of video streaming and cloud services, enterprise and access networks receive much more traffic than they send, and must rely on the Internet to offer good end-to-end performance. These edge networks often connect to multiple ISPs for better performance and reliability, but have only limited ways to influence which of their ISPs carries the traffic for each service. In this paper, we present Sprite, a software-defined solution for flexible inbound traffic engineering (TE). Sprite offers direct, fine-grained control over inbound traffic, by announcing different public IP prefixes to each ISP, and performing source network address translation (SNAT) on outbound request traffic. Our design achieves scalability in both the data plane (by performing SNAT on edge switches close to the clients) and the control plane (by having local agents install the SNAT rules). The controller translates high-level TE objectives, based on client and server names, as well as performance metrics, to a dynamic network policy based on real-time traffic and performance measurements. We evaluate Sprite with live data from &#x69;&#x0308;n the wild&#x20;&#x0308;experiments on an EC2-based testbed, and demonstrate how Sprite dynamically adapts the network policy to achieve high-level TE objectives, such as balancing YouTube traffic among ISPs to improve video quality.
     3150</li>
     3151<br>
     3152
     3153
     3154
     3155<li>
    30263156<b>Tarui, Toshiaki and Kanada, Yasusi and Hayashi, Michiaki and Nakao, Akihiro</b>
    30273157, &quot;Federating heterogeneous network virtualization platforms by slice exchange point.&quot;
     
    34343564
    34353565<li>
     3566<b>Bassett, Ethan K. and Choffnes, David R. and Cunha, &#x49;&#x0301;talo and Scott, Colin and Anderson, Thomas and Krishnamurthy, Arvind</b>
     3567, &quot;Machiavellian Routing: Improving Internet Availability with BGP Poisoning.&quot
     3568Proceedings of the 10th ACM Workshop on Hot Topics in Networks, Cambridge, Massachusetts, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     35692011.
     3570doi:10.1145/2070562.2070573.
     3571</li>
     3572<br>
     3573
     3574
     3575
     3576<li>
    34363577<b>Bhanage, Gautam and Seskar, Ivan and Zhang, Yanyong and Raychaudhuri, Dipankar and Jain, Shweta</b>
    34373578, &quot;Experimental Evaluation of OpenVZ from a Testbed Deployment Perspective.&quot
     
    37793920
    37803921<li>
     3922<b>Bassett, Ethan K. and Scott, Colin and Choffnes, David R. and Cunha, &#x49;&#x0301;talo and Valancius, Vytautas and Feamster, Nick and Madhyastha, Harsha V. and Anderson, Thomas and Krishnamurthy, Arvind</b>
     3923, &quot;LIFEGUARD: Practical Repair of Persistent Route Failures.&quot
     3924Proceedings of the ACM SIGCOMM 2012 conference, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     39252012.
     3926doi:10.1145/2377677.2377756.
     3927</li>
     3928<br>
     3929
     3930
     3931
     3932<li>
    37813933<b>Bavier, Andy and Coady, Yvonne and Mack, Tony and Matthews, Chris and Mambretti, Joe and McGeer, Rick and Mueller, Paul and Snoeren, Alex and Yuen, Marco</b>
    37823934, &quot;GENICloud and transcloud.&quot
     
    43864538
    43874539<li>
     4540<b>Javed, Umar and Cunha, Italo and Choffnes, David and Bassett, Ethan K. and Anderson, Thomas and Krishnamurthy, Arvind</b>
     4541, &quot;PoiRoot: Investigating the Root Cause of Interdomain Path Changes.&quot
     4542Proceedings of the ACM SIGCOMM 2013 conference, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     45432013.
     4544doi:10.1145/2486001.2486036.
     4545</li>
     4546<br>
     4547
     4548
     4549
     4550<li>
    43884551<b>Jin, Ruofan and Wang, Bing</b>
    43894552, &quot;Malware Detection for Mobile Devices Using Software-Defined Networking.&quot
     
    45954758
    45964759<li>
     4760<b>Valancius, Vytautas and Ravi, Bharath and Feamster, Nick and Snoeren, Alex C.</b>
     4761, &quot;Quantifying the benefits of joint content and network routing.&quot
     4762Proceedings of the ACM SIGMETRICS/international conference on Measurement and modeling of computer systems - SIGMETRICS '13, Pittsburgh, PA, USA, ACM Press,
     47632013.
     4764doi:10.1145/2465529.2465762.
     4765</li>
     4766<br>
     4767
     4768
     4769
     4770<li>
    45974771<b>Wang, Yuefeng and Esposito, F. and Matta, I.</b>
    45984772, &quot;Demonstrating RINA Using the GENI Testbed.&quot
     
    50625236<li>
    50635237<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
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