Changes between Version 22 and Version 23 of GENIBibliography


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Timestamp:
01/07/15 16:45:21 (5 years ago)
Author:
Mark Berman
Comment:

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  • GENIBibliography

    v22 v23  
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    415415<a href="http://s3.amazonaws.com/marcoy&#x005F;thesis/Thesis.pdf">http://s3.amazonaws.com/marcoy&#x005F;thesis/Thesis.pdf</a>
    416 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Computer networking researchers often have access to a few dierent network testbeds (Section 1.2) for their experiments. However, those testbeds are limited in resources; contentions for resources are prominent in those testbeds especially when conference deadline is looming. Moreover, services running on those testbeds are subject to seasonal and daily trac spikes from users all round the world. Hence, demand for resources at the testbeds are high. Some researchers can use other testbeds in conjunction with the ones they are using. Even though each of the testbeds may have dierent infrastructures, and characteristics, in the end, what the researchers receive in return is a set of computing resources, either virtual machines or physical machines. Essentially, those testbeds are providing a similar service, but researchers have to manage the credentials for accessing the testbeds manually, and they have to manually request resources from dierent testbeds in order to setup experiments that span across dierent testbeds. This thesis presents GENICloud, a project that enables the federation of testbeds with clouds. Computing and storage resources can be provisioned to researchers and services running on existing testbeds dynamically from an Eucalyptus cloud. As a part of the GENICloud project, the user proxy (Section 3.4) provides a less arduous method for testbeds administrators to federate with other testbeds; the same serviceiv also manages researchers credentials, so they do not have to acquire resources from each testbed individually. The user proxy provides a single interface for researchers to interact with dierent testbeds and clouds and manage their experiments. Furthermore, GENICloud demonstrates that there are, in fact, quite a few architectural similarities between dierent testbeds and even clouds
     416<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Computer networking researchers often have access to a few di
     417erent network testbeds (Section 1.2) for their experiments. However, those testbeds are limited in resources; contentions for resources are prominent in those testbeds especially when conference deadline is looming. Moreover, services running on those testbeds are subject to seasonal and daily trac spikes from users all round the world. Hence, demand for resources at the testbeds are high. Some researchers can use other testbeds in conjunction with the ones they are using. Even though each of the testbeds may have di
     418erent infrastructures, and characteristics, in the end, what the researchers receive in return is a set of computing resources, either virtual machines or physical machines. Essentially, those testbeds are providing a similar service, but researchers have to manage the credentials for accessing the testbeds manually, and they have to manually request resources from di
     419erent testbeds in order to setup experiments that span across di
     420erent testbeds. This thesis presents GENICloud, a project that enables the federation of testbeds with clouds. Computing and storage resources can be provisioned to researchers and services running on existing testbeds dynamically from an Eucalyptus cloud. As a part of the GENICloud project, the user proxy (Section 3.4) provides a less arduous method for testbeds administrators to federate with other testbeds; the same serviceiv also manages researchers credentials, so they do not have to acquire resources from each testbed individually. The user proxy provides a single interface for researchers to interact with di
     421erent testbeds and clouds and manage their experiments. Furthermore, GENICloud demonstrates that there are, in fact, quite a few architectural similarities between di
     422erent testbeds and even clouds
    417423</li>
    418424<br>
     
    19021908
    19031909<li>
     1910<b>Bronzino, Francesco and Han, Chao and Chen, Yang and Nagaraja, Kiran and Yang, Xiaowei and Seskar, Ivan and Raychaudhuri, Dipankar</b>
     1911, &quot;In-Network Compute Extensions for Rate-Adaptive Content Delivery in Mobile Networks.&quot;
     1912Network Protocols (ICNP), 2014 IEEE 22nd International Conference on, IEEE,
     19132014.
     1914doi:10.1109/icnp.2014.81.
     1915<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.81">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.81</a>
     1916<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Traffic from mobile wireless networks has been growing at a fast pace in recent years and is expected to surpass wired traffic very soon. Service providers face significant challenges at such scales including providing seamless mobility, efficient data delivery, security, and provisioning capacity at the wireless edge. In the Mobility First project, we have been exploring clean slate enhancements to the network protocols that can inherently provide support for at-scale mobility and trustworthiness in the Internet. An extensible data plane using pluggable compute-layer services is a key component of this architecture. We believe these extensions can be used to implement in-network services to enhance mobile end-user experience by either off-loading work and/or traffic from mobile devices, or by enabling en-route service-adaptation through context-awareness (e.g., Knowing contemporary access bandwidth). In this work we present details of the architectural support for in-network services within Mobility First, and propose protocol and service-API extensions to flexibly address these pluggable services from end-points. As a demonstrative example, we implement an in network service that does rate adaptation when delivering video streams to mobile devices that experience variable connection quality. We present details of our deployment and evaluation of the non-IP protocols along with compute-layer extensions on the GENI test bed, where we used a set of programmable nodes across 7 distributed sites to configure a Mobility First network with hosts, routers, and in-network compute services.
     1917</li>
     1918<br>
     1919
     1920
     1921
     1922<li>
    19041923<b>Brown, D. and Ascigil, O. and Nasir, H. and Carpenter, C. and Griffioen, J. and Calvert, K.</b>
    19051924, &quot;Designing a GENI Experimenter Tool to Support the Choice Net Internet Architecture.&quot;
     
    19411960
    19421961<li>
     1962<b>Collings, Jake and Liu, Jun</b>
     1963, &quot;An OpenFlow-Based Prototype of SDN-Oriented Stateful Hardware Firewalls.&quot;
     1964Network Protocols (ICNP), 2014 IEEE 22nd International Conference on, IEEE,
     19652014.
     1966doi:10.1109/icnp.2014.83.
     1967<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.83">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.83</a>
     1968<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>This paper describes an Open Flow-based prototype of a SDN-oriented stateful hardware firewall. The prototype of a SDN-oriented stateful hardware firewall includes an Open Flow-enabled switch and a firewall controller. The security rules are specified in the flow table in both the Open Flow-enabled switch and the firewall controller. The firewall controller is in charge of making control decisions on regulating the unidentified traffic flows. A communication channel is needed between a firewall controller and an Open Flow enabled switch. Through this channel, a switch sends to the controller with the information of unidentified flows, and the controller sends to the switch with the control decisions. Constraining this communication overhead is important to the applicability of the prototype because a high communication overhead could disturb the performance evaluation on the operation of a SDN-oriented stateful hardware firewall.
     1969</li>
     1970<br>
     1971
     1972
     1973
     1974<li>
    19431975<b>Dane, L. and Gurkan, D.</b>
    19441976, &quot;GENI with a Network Processing Unit: Enriching SDN Application Experiments.&quot;
     
    19541986
    19551987<li>
     1988<b>Dumba, Braulio and Sun, Guobao and Mekky, Hesham and Zhang, Zhi-Li</b>
     1989, &quot;Experience in Implementing &#x0026;amp; Deploying a Non-IP Routing Protocol VIRO in GENI.&quot;
     1990Network Protocols (ICNP), 2014 IEEE 22nd International Conference on, IEEE,
     19912014.
     1992doi:10.1109/icnp.2014.85.
     1993<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.85">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.85</a>
     1994<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we describe our experience in implementing a non-IP routing protocol - Virtual Id Routing (VIRO) - using the OVS-SDN platform in GENI. As a novel, &#x70;&#x0308;lug-&#x0026;amp;-play&#x2c;&#x0308; routing paradigm for future dynamic networks, VIRO decouples routing/forwarding from addressing by introducing a topology-aware, structured virtual id layer to encode the locations of switches and devices in the physical topology for scalable and resilient routing. Despite its general &#x6d;&#x0308;atch-action&#x20;&#x0308;forwarding function, the existing OVS-SDN platform is closely tied to the conventional Ethernet/IP/TCP header formats, and cannot be directly used to implement the new VIRO routing/forwarding paradigm. As a result, we repurpose the Ethernet MAC address to represent VIRO virtual id, modify and extend the OVS (both within the user space and the kernel space) to implement the VIRO forwarding functions. We also utilize a set of local POX controllers (one per VIRO switch) to emulate the VIRO distributed control plane and one global POX controller to realize the VIRO (centralized) management plane. We evaluate our prototype implementation through the Mininet emulation and GENI deployment test and discuss some lessons learned using the test-bed.
     1995</li>
     1996<br>
     1997
     1998
     1999
     2000<li>
    19562001<b>Fei, Zongming and Xu, Qingrong and Lu, Hui</b>
    19572002, &quot;Generating large network topologies for GENI experiments.&quot;
     
    21112156<li>
    21122157<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     2158, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot;
     2159Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
     21602014.
     2161doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932970.
     2162<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970</a>
     2163<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Networks (SDNs), primarily based on OpenFlow, are being deployed in single domain networks around the world. The popularity of SDNs has given rise to multiple considerations about designing, implementing, and operating Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs), to enable SDNs to interconnect SDN islands and to extend SDNs across multiple domains. These goals can be accomplished only by developing new techniques that extend the single domain orientation of current SDN/OpenFlow approaches to include capabilities for multidomain control, including those for resource discovery, signaling, and dynamic provisioning. Several networking research communities have begun to investigate these concepts. Early architectural models of SDXs have been designed and implemented as prototypes. These SDXs are being used to conduct experiments and to demonstrate the potentials of SDXs.
     2164</li>
     2165<br>
     2166
     2167<li>
     2168<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    21132169, &quot;Creating environments for innovation: Designing and implementing advanced experimental network research testbeds based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility and the StarLight Exchange.&quot;
    21142170Computer Networks,
     
    21202176<br>
    21212177
    2122 <li>
    2123 <b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    2124 , &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot;
    2125 Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
    2126 2014.
    2127 doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932970.
    2128 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970</a>
    2129 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Networks (SDNs), primarily based on OpenFlow, are being deployed in single domain networks around the world. The popularity of SDNs has given rise to multiple considerations about designing, implementing, and operating Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs), to enable SDNs to interconnect SDN islands and to extend SDNs across multiple domains. These goals can be accomplished only by developing new techniques that extend the single domain orientation of current SDN/OpenFlow approaches to include capabilities for multidomain control, including those for resource discovery, signaling, and dynamic provisioning. Several networking research communities have begun to investigate these concepts. Early architectural models of SDXs have been designed and implemented as prototypes. These SDXs are being used to conduct experiments and to demonstrate the potentials of SDXs.
    2130 </li>
    2131 <br>
    2132 
    21332178
    21342179
     
    21992244
    22002245<li>
     2246<b>Navaz, Abdul and Velusam, Gandhimathi and Gurkan, Deniz</b>
     2247, &quot;Experiments on Networking of Hadoop.&quot;
     2248Network Protocols (ICNP), 2014 IEEE 22nd International Conference on, IEEE,
     22492014.
     2250doi:10.1109/icnp.2014.87.
     2251<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.87">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.87</a>
     2252<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Hadoop is a popular application process big data problems in a networked dist computers. Investigations of performance for networking have been of interest with the networking paradigm through on-demand an enforcements. Network usage characterization can further help understand what policy info needed during application use cases. At scale e Hadoop jobs will help facilitate such char report how Hadoop networking usage can be chi experimentation environment using the Environment for Network Innovation). Further distributed switch framework that may help alleviate the fault tolerance schemes in Hadoop application in the forwarding plane. Delay in recovery from failures has been reduced by almost 99\\ through such a distributed switch architecture deployed on the GENT experimentation environment.
     2253</li>
     2254<br>
     2255
     2256
     2257
     2258<li>
    22012259<b>Nozaki, Yoshihiro and Bakshi, Parth and Tuncer, Hasan and Shenoy, Nirmala</b>
    22022260, &quot;Evaluation of tiered routing protocol in floating cloud tiered internet architecture.&quot;
     
    22642322
    22652323<li>
     2324<b>Ruth, Paul and Mandal, Anirban</b>
     2325, &quot;Domain Science Applications on GENI: Presentation and Demo.&quot;
     2326Network Protocols (ICNP), 2014 IEEE 22nd International Conference on, IEEE,
     23272014.
     2328doi:10.1109/icnp.2014.86.
     2329<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.86">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.86</a>
     2330<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Multi-tenant cloud infrastructures are increasingly used for high-performance and high-throughput domain science applications. In recent years, machine virtualization has come a long way toward supporting domain science applications. Various cloud platforms, such as Open Stack, Cloud Stack, and Amazon EC2 are attracting scientists to these platforms with the promise of customized environments with virtually infinite compute resources. At the same time, research efforts, such as NSF GENI are bringing together cloud computing with advanced network infrastructure provisioning. This paper presents work toward evaluating the use of GENI to support domain science applications. The evaluation involved two different domain science applications deployed on ExoGENI and Insta GENI. The first application is ADCIRC, a storm surge model that uses Message Passing Interface (MPI). The second is Motif network, a genomics application using the Pegasus workflow management system to manage a large data-intensive workflow.
     2331</li>
     2332<br>
     2333
     2334
     2335
     2336<li>
    22662337<b>Schwerdel, Dennis and Reuther, Bernd and Zinner, Thomas and M\\uller, Paul and Tran-Gia, Phouc</b>
    22672338, &quot;Future Internet research and experimentation: The G-Lab approach.&quot;
     
    23812452
    23822453<li>
     2454<b>Wang, Qing and Xu, Ke and Izard, Ryan and Kribbs, Benton and Porter, Joseph and Wang, Kuang-Ching and Prakash, Aditya and Ramanathan, Parmesh</b>
     2455, &quot;GENI Cinema: An SDN-Assisted Scalable Live Video Streaming Service.&quot;
     2456Network Protocols (ICNP), 2014 IEEE 22nd International Conference on, IEEE,
     24572014.
     2458doi:10.1109/icnp.2014.84.
     2459<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.84">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.84</a>
     2460<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>This paper introduces GENI Cinema (GC), a system that provides a scalable live video streaming service based on dynamic traffic steering with software defined networking (SDN) and demand driven instantiation of video relay servers in NSF GENI's distributed cloud environments. While the service can be used to relay a multitude of video content, its initial objective is to support live video streaming of educational content such as lectures and seminars among university campuses. Users on any campus would bootstrap video upload or download via a public web portal and, for scalability, have the video delivered seamlessly across the network over one or multiple paths selected and dynamically controlled by GC. The architecture aims to provide a framework for addressing several well-known limitations of video streaming in today's Internet, where little control is available for controlling forwarding paths of on demand live video streams. GC utilizes GENI's distributed cloud servers to host on-demand video servers/relays and its Open Flow SDN to achieve seamless video upload/download and optimization of forwarding paths in the network core. This paper presents the architecture and an early prototype of the basic GC framework, together with some initial performance measurement results.
     2461</li>
     2462<br>
     2463
     2464
     2465
     2466<li>
     2467<b>Wang, Yuefeng and Akhtar, Nabeel and Matta, Ibrahim</b>
     2468, &quot;Programming Routing Policies for Video Traffic.&quot;
     2469Network Protocols (ICNP), 2014 IEEE 22nd International Conference on, IEEE,
     24702014.
     2471doi:10.1109/icnp.2014.80.
     2472<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.80">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2014.80</a>
     2473<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Making the network programmable simplifies network management and enables network innovations. The Recursive Inter Network Architecture (RINA) is our solution to enable network programmability. ProtoRINA is a user-space prototype of RINA and provides users with a framework with common mechanisms so a user can program recursive-networking policies without implementing mechanisms from scratch. In this paper, we focus on how routing policies, which is an important aspect of network management, can be programmed using ProtoRINA, and demonstrate how ProtoRINA can be used to achieve better performance for a video streaming application by instantiating different routing policies over the GENI (Global Environment for Network Innovations) test bed, which provides a large-scale experimental facility for networking research.
     2474</li>
     2475<br>
     2476
     2477
     2478
     2479<li>
    23832480<b>Wang, Yuefeng and Matta, I. and Akhtar, N.</b>
    23842481, &quot;Experimenting with Routing Policies Using ProtoRINA over GENI.&quot;
     
    24082505<li>
    24092506<b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
     2507, &quot;Scaling up applications over distributed clouds with dynamic layer-2 exchange and broadcast service.&quot;
     2508Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
     25092014.
     2510doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932973.
     2511<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973</a>
     2512<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we study the problem of provisioning large-scale virtual clusters over federated clouds connected by multi-domain, layer-2 wide area networks. We first present the virtual cluster request abstraction and the abstraction models for substrate resource pools. Based on these two abstraction models, we developed a novel layer-2 exchange mechanism and an implementation of it in a multi-domain networked cloud environment. The design of the mechanism takes into consideration the realistic constraints in current network and cloud systems. We show that efficient cluster splitting, cloud data center selection and resource allocation algorithms can be developed to provision large-scale virtual clusters across cloud sites. A prototype system has been deployed and integrated into the ExoGENI testbed for about a year, and is being heavily used by scientific and data analytic applications.
     2513</li>
     2514<br>
     2515
     2516<li>
     2517<b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
    24102518, &quot;Capacity of Inter-cloud Layer-2 Virtual Networking.&quot;
    24112519Proceedings of the 2014 ACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, USA, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     
    24142522<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2627566.2627573">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2627566.2627573</a>
    24152523<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Due to the economy of scale of Ethernet networks and available dynamic circuit capability from the major national research and educational networks, VLAN (Virtual LAN) based virtual networking solution has been successfully adopted in some advanced distributed cloud systems. However, there are two major constraints in this adaptation: (1) dynamic circuit service is far from pervasive; (2) there is only limited VLAN tags offered by regional network service providers. In this paper, after examining layer-2 networking in large-scale distributed cloud environments, we present a graph theoretical model to study the network capacity in terms of the number of inter-cloud connections that can co-exist. We further design the algorithms to achieve this capacity for both point-to-point and multi-point inter-cloud connections in both static and dynamic scenarios. We also study a general topology embedding problem based on this model. As tagging is a common mechanism for isolating communication channels in other network layers, the proposed models and algorithms can be extended to optical and IP networks.
    2416 </li>
    2417 <br>
    2418 
    2419 <li>
    2420 <b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
    2421 , &quot;Scaling up applications over distributed clouds with dynamic layer-2 exchange and broadcast service.&quot;
    2422 Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
    2423 2014.
    2424 doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932973.
    2425 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973</a>
    2426 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we study the problem of provisioning large-scale virtual clusters over federated clouds connected by multi-domain, layer-2 wide area networks. We first present the virtual cluster request abstraction and the abstraction models for substrate resource pools. Based on these two abstraction models, we developed a novel layer-2 exchange mechanism and an implementation of it in a multi-domain networked cloud environment. The design of the mechanism takes into consideration the realistic constraints in current network and cloud systems. We show that efficient cluster splitting, cloud data center selection and resource allocation algorithms can be developed to provision large-scale virtual clusters across cloud sites. A prototype system has been deployed and integrated into the ExoGENI testbed for about a year, and is being heavily used by scientific and data analytic applications.
    24272524</li>
    24282525<br>
     
    40594156
    40604157<li>
     4158<b>Bronzino, Francesco and Han, Chao and Chen, Yang and Nagaraja, Kiran and Yang, Xiaowei and Seskar, Ivan and Raychaudhuri, Dipankar</b>
     4159, &quot;In-Network Compute Extensions for Rate-Adaptive Content Delivery in Mobile Networks.&quot
     4160Network Protocols (ICNP), 2014 IEEE 22nd International Conference on, IEEE,
     41612014.
     4162doi:10.1109/icnp.2014.81.
     4163</li>
     4164<br>
     4165
     4166
     4167
     4168<li>
    40614169<b>Brown, D. and Ascigil, O. and Nasir, H. and Carpenter, C. and Griffioen, J. and Calvert, K.</b>
    40624170, &quot;Designing a GENI Experimenter Tool to Support the Choice Net Internet Architecture.&quot
     
    40924200
    40934201<li>
     4202<b>Collings, Jake and Liu, Jun</b>
     4203, &quot;An OpenFlow-Based Prototype of SDN-Oriented Stateful Hardware Firewalls.&quot
     4204Network Protocols (ICNP), 2014 IEEE 22nd International Conference on, IEEE,
     42052014.
     4206doi:10.1109/icnp.2014.83.
     4207</li>
     4208<br>
     4209
     4210
     4211
     4212<li>
    40944213<b>Dane, L. and Gurkan, D.</b>
    40954214, &quot;GENI with a Network Processing Unit: Enriching SDN Application Experiments.&quot
     
    41034222
    41044223<li>
     4224<b>Dumba, Braulio and Sun, Guobao and Mekky, Hesham and Zhang, Zhi-Li</b>
     4225, &quot;Experience in Implementing &#x0026;amp; Deploying a Non-IP Routing Protocol VIRO in GENI.&quot
     4226Network Protocols (ICNP), 2014 IEEE 22nd International Conference on, IEEE,
     42272014.
     4228doi:10.1109/icnp.2014.85.
     4229</li>
     4230<br>
     4231
     4232
     4233
     4234<li>
    41054235<b>Fei, Zongming and Xu, Qingrong and Lu, Hui</b>
    41064236, &quot;Generating large network topologies for GENI experiments.&quot
     
    42364366<li>
    42374367<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     4368, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot
     4369Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
     43702014.
     4371doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932970.
     4372</li>
     4373<br>
     4374
     4375<li>
     4376<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    42384377, &quot;Creating environments for innovation: Designing and implementing advanced experimental network research testbeds based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility and the StarLight Exchange.&quot
    42394378Computer Networks,
    424043792014.
    42414380doi:10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024.
    4242 </li>
    4243 <br>
    4244 
    4245 <li>
    4246 <b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    4247 , &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot
    4248 Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
    4249 2014.
    4250 doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932970.
    42514381</li>
    42524382<br>
     
    43104440
    43114441<li>
     4442<b>Navaz, Abdul and Velusam, Gandhimathi and Gurkan, Deniz</b>
     4443, &quot;Experiments on Networking of Hadoop.&quot
     4444Network Protocols (ICNP), 2014 IEEE 22nd International Conference on, IEEE,
     44452014.
     4446doi:10.1109/icnp.2014.87.
     4447</li>
     4448<br>
     4449
     4450
     4451
     4452<li>
    43124453<b>Nozaki, Yoshihiro and Bakshi, Parth and Tuncer, Hasan and Shenoy, Nirmala</b>
    43134454, &quot;Evaluation of tiered routing protocol in floating cloud tiered internet architecture.&quot
     
    43654506
    43664507<li>
     4508<b>Ruth, Paul and Mandal, Anirban</b>
     4509, &quot;Domain Science Applications on GENI: Presentation and Demo.&quot
     4510Network Protocols (ICNP), 2014 IEEE 22nd International Conference on, IEEE,
     45112014.
     4512doi:10.1109/icnp.2014.86.
     4513</li>
     4514<br>
     4515
     4516
     4517
     4518<li>
    43674519<b>Schwerdel, Dennis and Reuther, Bernd and Zinner, Thomas and M\\uller, Paul and Tran-Gia, Phouc</b>
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