Changes between Version 55 and Version 56 of GENIBibliography


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Timestamp:
06/13/17 10:35:21 (22 months ago)
Author:
Mark Berman
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  • GENIBibliography

    v55 v56  
    189189
    190190<li>
     191<b>Antequera, Ronny B. and Calyam, Prasad and Chandrashekara, Arjun A. and Malhotra, Shivoam</b>
     192, &quot;Recommending Resources to Cloud Applications Based on Custom Templates Composition.&quot;
     193Proceedings of the Computing Frontiers Conference, Siena, Italy, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     1942017.
     195doi:10.1145/3075564.3075582.
     196<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/3075564.3075582">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/3075564.3075582</a>
     197<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Emerging interdisciplinary data-intensive applications in science and engineering fields (e.g. bioinformatics, cybermanufacturing) demand the use of high-performance computing resources. However, data-intensive applications' local resources usually present limited capacity and availability due to sizable upfront costs. The applications requirements warrant intelligent resource 'abstractions' coupled with 'reusable' approaches to save time and effort in deploying cyberinfrastructure (CI). In this paper, we present a novel 'custom templates' management middleware to overcome this scarcity of resources by use of advanced CI management technologies/protocols to on-demand deploy data-intensive applications across distributed/federated cloud resources. Our middleware comprises of a novel resource recommendation scheme that abstracts user requirements of data-intensive applications and matches them with federated cloud resources using custom templates in a catalog. We evaluate the accuracy of our recommendation scheme in two experiment scenarios. The experiments involve simulating a series of user interactions with diverse applications requirements, also feature a real-world data-intensive application case study. Our experiment results show that our scheme improves the resource recommendation accuracy by up to 21&#x0025;, compared to the existing schemes.
     198</li>
     199<br>
     200
     201
     202
     203<li>
    191204<b>Antonenko, V. and Smeliansky, R. and Baldin, I. and Izhvanov, Y. and Gugel, Y.</b>
    192205, &quot;Towards SDI-bases Infrastructure for supporting science in Russia.&quot;
     
    579592
    580593<li>
     594<b>Bhat, Shireesh</b>
     595, &quot;Network Service Orchestration within the ChoiceNet Architecture (Doctoral dissertation).&quot;
     596
     5972017.
     598
     599<a href="http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.20/34346">http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.20/34346</a>
     600<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this research we present Network Service Orchestration algorithms for Open Marketplaces which allow for various Data Plane Services in the routing domain to be advertised, queried, composed, purchased and provisioned. We use ChoiceNet as an example of an Open Marketplace in our work. Orchestration of services allows for constructing a ''composed service'' using the various compatible services participating in the Marketplace in response to a ''composed service'' request by the User. The Orchestration algorithm presents the User with not just ''a composed service'' but a list of ''composed service(s)'' to choose from. Our contribution can be classified into two main categories. First, we enable Orchestration by solving three key problems: a) Identify compatibility of adjacent services in a composed service; b) Provide the ability to compare service offerings from different providers and c) Develop a Planner (Orchestration Algorithm) module with request/response automation. Second, we develop three complementary algorithms which perform service Orchestration: a) Find optimal k composed services in a Marketplace, which allows combining multiple service functionalities into one service; b) Find optimal time-dependent, time-constrained composed services which supports in-advance path reservation and c) Find a optimal composed tour of services. We address the key problems for enabling Orchestration by first defining the Semantics Language for advertising the Data Plane Services to be compatible with other services which are a logical choice. In addition, we define the Protocol for interaction between the entities of ChoiceNet to achieve complete automation of the Planner. Later, we present three flavors of Planners which perform service orchestration on three different graph models which correspond to three different Network Applications.
     601</li>
     602<br>
     603
     604
     605
     606<li>
    581607<b>Bhat, Shireesh and Udechukwu, Robinson and Dutta, Rudra and Rouskas, George N.</b>
    582608, &quot;Inception to application: A GENI based prototype of an open Marketplace for network services.&quot;
     
    826852
    827853<li>
     854<b>Cecil, J. and Gupta, Avinash and Ramanathan, P. and Pirela-Cruz, Miguel</b>
     855, &quot;A distributed collaborative simulation environment for orthopedic surgical training.&quot;
     8562017 Annual IEEE International Systems Conference (SysCon), Montreal, QC, Canada, IEEE,
     8572017.
     858doi:10.1109/syscon.2017.7934721.
     859<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/syscon.2017.7934721">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/syscon.2017.7934721</a>
     860<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The use of Virtual Reality (VR) simulators has increased rapidly in the field of medical surgery for training purposes. In this paper, the design and development of a Virtual Surgical Environment (VSE) for training residents in an orthopaedic surgical process called Less Invasive Stabilization System (LISS) surgery is discussed; LISS plating surgery is a process used to address fractures of the femur bone. The development of such virtual environments for educational and training purposes will accelerate and supplement existing training approaches enabling medical residents to be better prepared to serve the surgical needs of the general public. One of the important aspects of the VSE is that it is a network based simulator. Our approach explores the potential of emerging Next Generation Internet frameworks and technologies to support such distributed interaction contexts. A discussion of the validation activities is also presented, which highlights the effectiveness of the VSE for teaching medical residents and students.
     861</li>
     862<br>
     863
     864
     865
     866<li>
    828867<b>Chakrabortty, Aranya and Xin, Yufeng</b>
    829868, &quot;Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulations and Verifications of Smart Power Systems Over an Exo-GENI Testbed.&quot;
     
    853892<li>
    854893<b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
     894, &quot;Cont2: Social-Aware Content and Contact Based File Search in Delay Tolerant Networks.&quot;
     895Proceedings of the 2013 42Nd International Conference on Parallel Processing, IEEE Computer Society, Washington, DC, USA,
     8962013.
     897doi:10.1109/icpp.2013.28.
     898<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icpp.2013.28">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icpp.2013.28</a>
     899<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we focus on distributed file search over a delay tolerant network (DTN) formed by mobile devices that exhibit the characteristics of social networks. Current file search methods in MANETs/DTNs are either content-based or contact-based. The former builds routing tables for node contents but is not resilient to high node mobility, while the latter exploits node contact patterns in the social networks but may lead to high latency. Recent research also reveal the importance of interests in realizing efficient file dissemination in DTNs. In this paper, we first analyze node interest and mobility from real traces, which confirms the shortcomings of a contact based method and show the importance of considering both content/interest and contact in file search. We then propose Cont2, a social-aware file search method which leverages both node social interests (content) and contact patterns to enhance search efficiency. First, considering people with common interests tend to share files and gather together, Cont2 virtually groups common-interest nodes into a community to direct file search. Second, considering human mobility follows a certain pattern, Cont2 exploits nodes that have high contact frequency with the queried content. Third, Cont2 also exploits active nodes that have more connections to others as a complementary approach to expedite file search. Trace-driven experimental on the real-world GENI test bed and NS-2 simulator show that Cont2 can significantly improve the search efficiency compared to current methods.
     900</li>
     901<br>
     902
     903<li>
     904<b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
    855905, &quot;Global optimization of file availability through replication for efficient file sharing in MANETs.&quot;
    856906Network Protocols (ICNP), 2011 19th IEEE International Conference on, Vancouver, AB, Canada, IEEE,
     
    859909<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2011.6089056">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icnp.2011.6089056</a>
    860910<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>File sharing applications in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) have attracted more and more attention in recent years. The efficiency of file querying suffers from the distinctive properties of MANETs including node mobility and limited communication range and resource. An intuitive method to alleviate this problem is to create file replicas in the network. However, despite the efforts on file replication, no research has focused on the global optimal replica sharing with minimum average querying delay. Specifically, current file replication protocols in MANETs have two shortcomings. First, they lack a rule to allocate limited resource to different files in order to minimize the average querying delay. Second, they simply consider storage as resource for replicas, but neglect the fact that the file holders' frequency of meeting other nodes also plays an important role in determining file availability. A node having a higher meeting frequency with others provides higher availability to its files. In this paper, we introduce a new concept of resource for file replication, which considers both node storage and meeting frequency. We theoretically study the influence of resource allocation on the average querying delay and derive a resource allocation rule to minimize the average querying delay. We further propose a distributed file replication protocol that follows the rule. The trace-driven experiments on both the real-world GENI testbed and NS-2 show that our protocol can achieve shorter average querying delay at lower cost than current replication protocols, which justifies the correctness of our theoretical analysis and the effectiveness of the proposed protocol.
    861 </li>
    862 <br>
    863 
    864 <li>
    865 <b>Chen, Kang and Shen, Haiying</b>
    866 , &quot;Cont2: Social-Aware Content and Contact Based File Search in Delay Tolerant Networks.&quot;
    867 Proceedings of the 2013 42Nd International Conference on Parallel Processing, IEEE Computer Society, Washington, DC, USA,
    868 2013.
    869 doi:10.1109/icpp.2013.28.
    870 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icpp.2013.28">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icpp.2013.28</a>
    871 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we focus on distributed file search over a delay tolerant network (DTN) formed by mobile devices that exhibit the characteristics of social networks. Current file search methods in MANETs/DTNs are either content-based or contact-based. The former builds routing tables for node contents but is not resilient to high node mobility, while the latter exploits node contact patterns in the social networks but may lead to high latency. Recent research also reveal the importance of interests in realizing efficient file dissemination in DTNs. In this paper, we first analyze node interest and mobility from real traces, which confirms the shortcomings of a contact based method and show the importance of considering both content/interest and contact in file search. We then propose Cont2, a social-aware file search method which leverages both node social interests (content) and contact patterns to enhance search efficiency. First, considering people with common interests tend to share files and gather together, Cont2 virtually groups common-interest nodes into a community to direct file search. Second, considering human mobility follows a certain pattern, Cont2 exploits nodes that have high contact frequency with the queried content. Third, Cont2 also exploits active nodes that have more connections to others as a complementary approach to expedite file search. Trace-driven experimental on the real-world GENI test bed and NS-2 simulator show that Cont2 can significantly improve the search efficiency compared to current methods.
    872911</li>
    873912<br>
     
    955994<li>
    956995<b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
     996, &quot;Selective Packet Inspection to Detect DoS Flooding Using Software Defined Networking (SDN).&quot;
     997Distributed Computing Systems Workshops (ICDCSW), 2015 IEEE 35th International Conference on, IEEE,
     9982015.
     999doi:10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27.
     1000<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27</a>
     1001<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software-defined networking (SDN) and Open Flow have been driving new security applications and services. However, even if some of these studies provide interesting visions of what can be achieved, they stop short of presenting realistic application scenarios and experimental results. In this paper, we discuss a novel attack detection approach that coordinates monitors distributed over a network and controllers centralized on an SDN Open Virtual Switch (OVS), selectively inspecting network packets on demand. With different scale of network views and information availability, these two elements collaboratively detect signature constituents of an attack. Therefore, this approach is able to quickly issue an alert against potential threats followed by careful verification for high accuracy, while balancing the workload on the OVS. We have applied this method for detection and mitigation of TCP SYN flood attacks on Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI). This realistic experimentation has provided us with insightful findings helpful toward a systematic methodology of SDN-supported attack detection and containment.
     1002</li>
     1003<br>
     1004
     1005<li>
     1006<b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    9571007, &quot;An SDN-supported collaborative approach for DDoS flooding detection and containment.&quot;
    9581008Military Communications Conference, MILCOM 2015 - 2015 IEEE, IEEE,
     
    9611011<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/milcom.2015.7357519">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/milcom.2015.7357519</a>
    9621012<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Networking (SDN) has the potential to enable novel security applications that support flexible, on-demand deployment of system elements. It can offer targeted forensic evidence collection and investigation of computer network attacks. Such unique capabilities are instrumental to network intrusion detection that is challenged by large volumes of data and complex network topologies. This paper presents an innovative approach that coordinates distributed network traffic Monitors and attack Correlators supported by Open Virtual Switches (OVS). The Monitors conduct anomaly detection and the Correlators perform deep packet inspection for attack signature recognition. These elements take advantage of complementary views and information availability on both the data and control planes. Moreover, they collaboratively look for network flooding attack signature constituents that possess different characteristics in the level of information abstraction. Therefore, this approach is able to not only quickly raise an alert against potential threats, but also follow it up with careful verification to reduce false alarms. We experiment with this SDN-supported collaborative approach to detect TCP SYN flood attacks on the Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI), a realistic virtual testbed. The response times and detection accuracy, in the context of a small to medium corporate network, have demonstrated its effectiveness and scalability.
    963 </li>
    964 <br>
    965 
    966 <li>
    967 <b>Chin, Tommy and Mountrouidou, Xenia and Li, Xiangyang and Xiong, Kaiqi</b>
    968 , &quot;Selective Packet Inspection to Detect DoS Flooding Using Software Defined Networking (SDN).&quot;
    969 Distributed Computing Systems Workshops (ICDCSW), 2015 IEEE 35th International Conference on, IEEE,
    970 2015.
    971 doi:10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27.
    972 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icdcsw.2015.27</a>
    973 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software-defined networking (SDN) and Open Flow have been driving new security applications and services. However, even if some of these studies provide interesting visions of what can be achieved, they stop short of presenting realistic application scenarios and experimental results. In this paper, we discuss a novel attack detection approach that coordinates monitors distributed over a network and controllers centralized on an SDN Open Virtual Switch (OVS), selectively inspecting network packets on demand. With different scale of network views and information availability, these two elements collaboratively detect signature constituents of an attack. Therefore, this approach is able to quickly issue an alert against potential threats followed by careful verification for high accuracy, while balancing the workload on the OVS. We have applied this method for detection and mitigation of TCP SYN flood attacks on Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI). This realistic experimentation has provided us with insightful findings helpful toward a systematic methodology of SDN-supported attack detection and containment.
    9741013</li>
    9751014<br>
     
    10151054
    10161055<li>
     1056<b>Chung, Joaquin and Cox, Jacob and Clark, Russ and Owen, Henry</b>
     1057, &quot;FAS: Federated Auditing for Software-defined exchanges.&quot;
     1058SoutheastCon 2017, Concord, NC, USA, IEEE,
     10592017.
     1060doi:10.1109/secon.2017.7925261.
     1061<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/secon.2017.7925261">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/secon.2017.7925261</a>
     1062<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The Software-defined exchange (SDX) allows multiple independent administrative domains to share computing, storage, and networking resources. One variation on the SDX applies software-defined networking (SDN) technologies to the fabric of an Internet exchange point (IXP) to support rich policy expression among participants. Similarly, Research and Education (R&#x0026;E) networks are introducing SDN at exchange points to enable network operators to provision network policies over multiple independent administrative domains. The federated nature of R&#x0026;E exchange points is based on a chain of trust between participant domains. However, trust and verifiability go hand in hand, an old adage says ” trust, but verify”, so a responsible network operator would like to verify that his or her policies are honored by the SDN domains participating at an SDX. Moreover, some SDX participants do not want to reveal internal topology information while proving they correctly deployed the requested policies. For these reasons, we propose Federated Auditing for SDX (FAS), a federated auditing framework for SDX configuration verification, which reveals the minimal necessary information to an SDX central controller. We also show our initial proof-of-concept and preliminary evaluation.
     1063</li>
     1064<br>
     1065
     1066
     1067
     1068<li>
    10171069<b>Chung, Joaquin and Owen, Henry and Clark, Russell</b>
    10181070, &quot;SDX architectures: A qualitative analysis.&quot;
     
    15361588<li>
    15371589<b>Gosain, Abhimanyu and Seskar, Ivan</b>
     1590, &quot;GENI Wireless Testbed: A Flexible Open Ecosystem for Wireless Communications Research: Demo.&quot;
     1591Proceedings of the 22Nd Annual International Conference on Mobile Computing and Networking, New York City, New York, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     15922016.
     1593doi:10.1145/2973750.2985627.
     1594<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2973750.2985627">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2973750.2985627</a>
     1595<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>This demo presents the architecture of GENI (Global Environment of Network Innovations) [1] edge cloud computing network in the form of compute and storage resources, a mobile 4G LTE edge and a high speed campus network connecting these components. GENI's edge computing strategy proceeds by deploying self-contained packages of network, computing, storage resources, or GENI Racks [2] connected via high speed fiber to LTE BS(s) across twelve campuses in the US, all interconnected via a nationwide research network. The GENI mobile computing resource manager is based on the Orbit Management framework (OMF) [3] and provides seamless access to the edge computing resources via the GENI Portal for experimentation, scheduling, data collection and processing.
     1596</li>
     1597<br>
     1598
     1599<li>
     1600<b>Gosain, Abhimanyu and Seskar, Ivan</b>
    15381601, &quot;GENI wireless testbed: An open edge ecosystem for ubiquitous computing applications.&quot;
    153916022017 IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications Workshops (PerCom Workshops), Kona, Big Island, HI, USA, IEEE,
     
    15421605<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/percomw.2017.7917520">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/percomw.2017.7917520</a>
    15431606<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>This demo presents the architecture of GENI (Global Environment of Network Innovations) [1] edge cloud computing network in the form of compute and storage systems, a mobile 4G LTE edge and a high speed campus network. GENI's edge computing strategy proceeds by deploying self-contained packages of network, computing, storage resources, or GENI Racks [2] connected via high speed fiber to LTE BS(s) across twelve campuses in the US, all interconnected via a nationwide research network. The GENI mobile computing resource manager is based on the Orbit Management framework (OMF) [3] and provides seamless access to the computing resources via the GENI Portal for experimentation, scheduling, data collection and processing of ubiquitous computing applications.
    1544 </li>
    1545 <br>
    1546 
    1547 <li>
    1548 <b>Gosain, Abhimanyu and Seskar, Ivan</b>
    1549 , &quot;GENI Wireless Testbed: A Flexible Open Ecosystem for Wireless Communications Research: Demo.&quot;
    1550 Proceedings of the 22Nd Annual International Conference on Mobile Computing and Networking, New York City, New York, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
    1551 2016.
    1552 doi:10.1145/2973750.2985627.
    1553 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2973750.2985627">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2973750.2985627</a>
    1554 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>This demo presents the architecture of GENI (Global Environment of Network Innovations) [1] edge cloud computing network in the form of compute and storage resources, a mobile 4G LTE edge and a high speed campus network connecting these components. GENI's edge computing strategy proceeds by deploying self-contained packages of network, computing, storage resources, or GENI Racks [2] connected via high speed fiber to LTE BS(s) across twelve campuses in the US, all interconnected via a nationwide research network. The GENI mobile computing resource manager is based on the Orbit Management framework (OMF) [3] and provides seamless access to the edge computing resources via the GENI Portal for experimentation, scheduling, data collection and processing.
    15551607</li>
    15561608<br>
     
    17791831<li>
    17801832<b>Huang, Shufeng and Griffioen, James and Calvert, Ken</b>
    1781 , &quot;PVNs: Making virtualized network infrastructure usable.&quot;
    1782 2012 ACM/IEEE Symposium on Architectures for Networking and Communications Systems (ANCS),
    1783 2012.
    1784 
    1785 <a href="http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=7846352">http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=7846352</a>
    1786 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Network virtualization is becoming a fundamental building block of future Internet architectures. Although the underlying network infrastructure needed to dynamically create and deploy custom virtual networks is rapidly taking shape ( e.g., GENI), constructing and using a virtual network is still a challenging and labor intensive task, one best left to experts. In this paper, we present the concept of a Packaged Virtual Network (PVN), that enables normal users to easily download, deploy and use application-specific virtual networks. At the heart of our approach is a PVN Hypervisor that ” runs” a PVN by allocating the virtual network resources needed by the PVN and then connecting the PVN's participants into the network on demand. To demonstrate our PVN approach, we implemented a multicast PVN that runs on the PVN hypervisor prototype using ProtoGENI as the underlying virtual network, allowing average users to create their own private multicast network.
    1787 </li>
    1788 <br>
    1789 
    1790 <li>
    1791 <b>Huang, Shufeng and Griffioen, James and Calvert, Ken</b>
    17921833, &quot;PVNs: Making Virtualized Network Infrastructure Usable.&quot;
    17931834ACM/IEEE Symposium on Architectures for Networking and Communications Systems (ANCS '12),
     
    18941935<li>
    18951936<b>Juluri, Parikshit and Tamarapalli, Venkatesh and Medhi, Deep</b>
    1896 , &quot;QoE management in DASH systems using the segment aware rate adaptation algorithm.&quot;
    1897 NOMS 2016 - 2016 IEEE/IFIP Network Operations and Management Symposium, IEEE,
    1898 2016.
    1899 doi:10.1109/noms.2016.7502805.
    1900 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/noms.2016.7502805">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/noms.2016.7502805</a>
    1901 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) enables the video player to adapt the bitrate of the video while streaming to ensure playback without interruptions even with varying throughput. A DASH server hosts multiple representations of the same video, each of which is broken down into small segments of fixed playback duration. The video bitrate adaptation is purely driven by the player at the endhost. Typically, the player employs an Adaptive Bitrate (ABR) algorithm, that determines the most appropriate representation for the next segment to be downloaded, based on the current network conditions and user preferences. The aim of an ABR algorithm is to dynamically manage the Quality of Experience (QoE) of the user during the playback. ABR algorithms manage the QoE by maximizing the bitrate while at the same time trying to minimize the other QoE metrics: playback start time, duration and number of buffering events, and the number of bitrate switching events. Typically, the ABR algorithms manage the QoE by using the measured network throughput and buffer occupancy to adapt the playback bitrate. However, due to the video encoding schemes employed, the sizes of the individual segments may vary significantly. For low bandwidth networks, fluctuation in the segment sizes results in inaccurate estimation the expected segment fetch times, thereby resulting in inaccurate estimation of the optimum bitrate. In this paper we demonstrate how the Segment-Aware Rate Adaptation (SARA) algorithm, that considers the measured throughput, buffer occupancy, and the variation in segment sizes helps in better management of the users' QoE in a DASH system. By comparing with a typical throughput-based and buffer-based adaptation algorithm under varying network conditions, we demonstrate that SARA manages the QoE better, especially in a low bandwidth network. We also developed AStream, an open-source Python-based emulated DASH-video player that was used to evaluate three different ABR algor- thms and measure the QoE metrics with each of them.
    1902 </li>
    1903 <br>
    1904 
    1905 <li>
    1906 <b>Juluri, Parikshit and Tamarapalli, Venkatesh and Medhi, Deep</b>
    19071937, &quot;SARA: Segment aware rate adaptation algorithm for dynamic adaptive streaming over HTTP.&quot;
    19081938Communication Workshop (ICCW), 2015 IEEE International Conference on, IEEE,
     
    19111941<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/iccw.2015.7247436">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/iccw.2015.7247436</a>
    19121942<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Dynamic adaptive HTTP (DASH) based streaming is steadily becoming the most popular online video streaming technique. DASH streaming provides seamless playback by adapting the video quality to the network conditions during the video playback. A DASH server supports adaptive streaming by hosting multiple representations of the video and each representation is divided into small segments of equal playback duration. At the client end, the video player uses an adaptive bitrate selection (ABR) algorithm to decide the bitrate to be selected for each segment depending on the current network conditions. Currently, proposed ABR algorithms ignore the fact that the segment sizes significantly vary for a given video bitrate. Due to this, even though an ABR algorithm is able to measure the network bandwidth, it may fail to predict the time to download the next segment In this paper, we propose a segment-aware rate adaptation (SARA) algorithm that considers the segment size variation in addition to the estimated path bandwidth and the current buffer occupancy to accurately predict the time required to download the next segment We also developed an open source Python based emulated DASH video player, that was used to compare the performance of SARA and a basic ABR. Our results show that SARA provides a significant gain over the basic algorithm in the video quality delivered, without noticeably impacting the video switching rates.
     1943</li>
     1944<br>
     1945
     1946<li>
     1947<b>Juluri, Parikshit and Tamarapalli, Venkatesh and Medhi, Deep</b>
     1948, &quot;QoE management in DASH systems using the segment aware rate adaptation algorithm.&quot;
     1949NOMS 2016 - 2016 IEEE/IFIP Network Operations and Management Symposium, IEEE,
     19502016.
     1951doi:10.1109/noms.2016.7502805.
     1952<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/noms.2016.7502805">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/noms.2016.7502805</a>
     1953<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) enables the video player to adapt the bitrate of the video while streaming to ensure playback without interruptions even with varying throughput. A DASH server hosts multiple representations of the same video, each of which is broken down into small segments of fixed playback duration. The video bitrate adaptation is purely driven by the player at the endhost. Typically, the player employs an Adaptive Bitrate (ABR) algorithm, that determines the most appropriate representation for the next segment to be downloaded, based on the current network conditions and user preferences. The aim of an ABR algorithm is to dynamically manage the Quality of Experience (QoE) of the user during the playback. ABR algorithms manage the QoE by maximizing the bitrate while at the same time trying to minimize the other QoE metrics: playback start time, duration and number of buffering events, and the number of bitrate switching events. Typically, the ABR algorithms manage the QoE by using the measured network throughput and buffer occupancy to adapt the playback bitrate. However, due to the video encoding schemes employed, the sizes of the individual segments may vary significantly. For low bandwidth networks, fluctuation in the segment sizes results in inaccurate estimation the expected segment fetch times, thereby resulting in inaccurate estimation of the optimum bitrate. In this paper we demonstrate how the Segment-Aware Rate Adaptation (SARA) algorithm, that considers the measured throughput, buffer occupancy, and the variation in segment sizes helps in better management of the users' QoE in a DASH system. By comparing with a typical throughput-based and buffer-based adaptation algorithm under varying network conditions, we demonstrate that SARA manages the QoE better, especially in a low bandwidth network. We also developed AStream, an open-source Python-based emulated DASH-video player that was used to evaluate three different ABR algor- thms and measure the QoE metrics with each of them.
    19131954</li>
    19141955<br>
     
    24752516<li>
    24762517<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     2518, &quot;Creating environments for innovation: Designing and implementing advanced experimental network research testbeds based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility and the StarLight Exchange.&quot;
     2519Computer Networks,
     25202014.
     2521doi:10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024.
     2522<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024">http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024</a>
     2523<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Large scale national and international experimental research environments are required to advance communication services and supporting network architecture, technology, and infrastructure. Theories and concepts are often explored using simulation and modeling techniques within labs or on small scale testbeds. However, while such testbeds are valuable resources for the research process, these facilities alone cannot provide an appropriate approximation of the real world conditions required to explore ideas at scale. Very large scale global, experimental network research capabilities are required to deeply investigate innovative concepts. For many years, network testbeds were created to address fairly specific, well defined, limited research goals, and they were implemented for fairly short periods. Recently, taking advantage of a number of macro information technology trends, such as virtualization and programmable resources, several network research communities have been developing innovative types of network research environments. Instead of designing traditional network testbeds, research communities are designing large scale, highly flexible distributed platforms that can be used to create many different types of testbeds. Also, rather than creating short term testbeds for limited research objectives, these new environments are being designed as long term persistent resources to support many types of experimental research. This paper describes the motivations for this trend, provides several examples of large scale distributed network research environments based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility (GLIF) and the StarLight Exchange Facility, including the Global Environment for Network Innovation (GENI), and indicates emerging future trends for these types of environments.
     2524</li>
     2525<br>
     2526
     2527<li>
     2528<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
     2529, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot;
     2530Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
     25312014.
     2532doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932970.
     2533<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970</a>
     2534<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Networks (SDNs), primarily based on OpenFlow, are being deployed in single domain networks around the world. The popularity of SDNs has given rise to multiple considerations about designing, implementing, and operating Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs), to enable SDNs to interconnect SDN islands and to extend SDNs across multiple domains. These goals can be accomplished only by developing new techniques that extend the single domain orientation of current SDN/OpenFlow approaches to include capabilities for multidomain control, including those for resource discovery, signaling, and dynamic provisioning. Several networking research communities have begun to investigate these concepts. Early architectural models of SDXs have been designed and implemented as prototypes. These SDXs are being used to conduct experiments and to demonstrate the potentials of SDXs.
     2535</li>
     2536<br>
     2537
     2538<li>
     2539<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    24772540, &quot;Next Generation Virtual Network Architecture for Multi-tenant Distributed Clouds: Challenges and Emerging Techniques.&quot;
    24782541Proceedings of the 4th Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     
    24812544<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2955193.2955194">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2955193.2955194</a>
    24822545<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Providing services for multiple tenants within a single or federated distributed cloud environment requires a variety of special considerations related to network design, provisioning, and operations. Especially important are multiple topics concerning the implementation of multiple parallel programmable virtual networks for large numbers of tenants, who require autonomous management, control, and data planes. This paper provides an overview of some of the challenges that arise from developing and implementing parallel programmable virtual networks, describes experiences with several experimental techniques for addressing those challenges based on large scale distributed testbeds, and presents the results of the experiments that were conducted. Distributed environments used include a distributed cloud testbed, the Chameleon Cloud, sponsored by the National Science Foundation's NSFCloud program, the NSF's Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI), an international distributed OpenFlow testbed, and the Open Science Data Cloud.
    2483 </li>
    2484 <br>
    2485 
    2486 <li>
    2487 <b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    2488 , &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot;
    2489 Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
    2490 2014.
    2491 doi:10.1109/itc.2014.6932970.
    2492 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932970</a>
    2493 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software Defined Networks (SDNs), primarily based on OpenFlow, are being deployed in single domain networks around the world. The popularity of SDNs has given rise to multiple considerations about designing, implementing, and operating Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs), to enable SDNs to interconnect SDN islands and to extend SDNs across multiple domains. These goals can be accomplished only by developing new techniques that extend the single domain orientation of current SDN/OpenFlow approaches to include capabilities for multidomain control, including those for resource discovery, signaling, and dynamic provisioning. Several networking research communities have begun to investigate these concepts. Early architectural models of SDXs have been designed and implemented as prototypes. These SDXs are being used to conduct experiments and to demonstrate the potentials of SDXs.
    2494 </li>
    2495 <br>
    2496 
    2497 <li>
    2498 <b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    2499 , &quot;Creating environments for innovation: Designing and implementing advanced experimental network research testbeds based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility and the StarLight Exchange.&quot;
    2500 Computer Networks,
    2501 2014.
    2502 doi:10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024.
    2503 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024">http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2013.12.024</a>
    2504 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Large scale national and international experimental research environments are required to advance communication services and supporting network architecture, technology, and infrastructure. Theories and concepts are often explored using simulation and modeling techniques within labs or on small scale testbeds. However, while such testbeds are valuable resources for the research process, these facilities alone cannot provide an appropriate approximation of the real world conditions required to explore ideas at scale. Very large scale global, experimental network research capabilities are required to deeply investigate innovative concepts. For many years, network testbeds were created to address fairly specific, well defined, limited research goals, and they were implemented for fairly short periods. Recently, taking advantage of a number of macro information technology trends, such as virtualization and programmable resources, several network research communities have been developing innovative types of network research environments. Instead of designing traditional network testbeds, research communities are designing large scale, highly flexible distributed platforms that can be used to create many different types of testbeds. Also, rather than creating short term testbeds for limited research objectives, these new environments are being designed as long term persistent resources to support many types of experimental research. This paper describes the motivations for this trend, provides several examples of large scale distributed network research environments based on the Global Lambda Integrated Facility (GLIF) and the StarLight Exchange Facility, including the Global Environment for Network Innovation (GENI), and indicates emerging future trends for these types of environments.
    25052546</li>
    25062547<br>
     
    29002941<li>
    29012942<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
     2943, &quot;Operational System Testing for Designed in Security.&quot;
     2944Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     29452013.
     2946doi:10.1145/2459976.2460038.
     2947<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2459976.2460038">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2459976.2460038</a>
     2948<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>To design secure systems, one needs to understand how attackers use system vulnerabilities in their favor. This requires testing vulnerabilities on operational systems. However, working on operational systems is not always possible because of the risk of disturbance. In this study, we introduce an approach to experimenting using operational system data and performing real attacks without disturbing the original system. We applied this approach to a network security experiment and tested the performance of three detection methods. The approach used in this study can be used when developing systems with Designed-in Security to identify and test system vulnerabilities.
     2949</li>
     2950<br>
     2951
     2952<li>
     2953<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
     2954, &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot;
     2955First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
     29562012.
     2957
     2958
     2959<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks are major security threats to the Internet. The distributed structure of these attacks makes it difficult to distinguish between legitimate and attack traffic, making detection difficult. In addition to this challenge, researchers also have to study and find countermeasures against these attacks without using an operational network for testing, since attacks on operational networks inconvenience users. In this paper, we propose a method to perform DDoS analysis on real hardware using real traffic without jeopardizing the original network. We implement our experiments on the Geni testbed using Openflow. We present results from DDoS detection methods using operational traffic.
     2960</li>
     2961<br>
     2962
     2963<li>
     2964<b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    29022965, &quot;Security experimentation using operational systems.&quot;
    29032966Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Workshop on Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     
    29062969<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2179298.2179388">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2179298.2179388</a>
    29072970<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Computers and Internet have evolved into necessary tools for our professional, personal and social lives. As a result of this growing dependence, there is a concern that these systems remain protected and available. This concern increases exponentially when considering systems such as smart power grids. Therefore, research should be conducted to develop effective ways of detecting system anomalies. To have realistic results, the studies should be tested on real systems. However, it is not possible to test these experiments on the live network. With the recent collaboration of Universities and research labs, a new experiment test bed has been established. As a result, experiments can now be implemented on real networks. In our study, we design an experiment to analyze Distributed Denial of Service Attacks (DDoS Attack) on a real network with real Internet traffic. The approach that we use in our study can easily be generalized to apply to smart power grids.
    2908 </li>
    2909 <br>
    2910 
    2911 <li>
    2912 <b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    2913 , &quot;Performance Analysis of DDoS Detection Methods on Real Network.&quot;
    2914 First GENI Research and Educational Experiment Workshop (GREE 2012), Los Angeles,
    2915 2012.
    2916 
    2917 
    2918 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks are major security threats to the Internet. The distributed structure of these attacks makes it difficult to distinguish between legitimate and attack traffic, making detection difficult. In addition to this challenge, researchers also have to study and find countermeasures against these attacks without using an operational network for testing, since attacks on operational networks inconvenience users. In this paper, we propose a method to perform DDoS analysis on real hardware using real traffic without jeopardizing the original network. We implement our experiments on the Geni testbed using Openflow. We present results from DDoS detection methods using operational traffic.
    2919 </li>
    2920 <br>
    2921 
    2922 <li>
    2923 <b>Ozcelik, Ilker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
    2924 , &quot;Operational System Testing for Designed in Security.&quot;
    2925 Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
    2926 2013.
    2927 doi:10.1145/2459976.2460038.
    2928 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2459976.2460038">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2459976.2460038</a>
    2929 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>To design secure systems, one needs to understand how attackers use system vulnerabilities in their favor. This requires testing vulnerabilities on operational systems. However, working on operational systems is not always possible because of the risk of disturbance. In this study, we introduce an approach to experimenting using operational system data and performing real attacks without disturbing the original system. We applied this approach to a network security experiment and tested the performance of three detection methods. The approach used in this study can be used when developing systems with Designed-in Security to identify and test system vulnerabilities.
    29302971</li>
    29312972<br>
     
    30123053
    30133054<li>
     3055<b>Rahimi, R. and Shao, C. and Veeraraghavan, M. and Fumagalli, A. and Nicho, J. and Meyer, J. and Edwards, S. and Flannigan, C. and Evans, P.</b>
     3056, &quot;An Industrial Robotics Application with Cloud Computing and High-Speed Networking.&quot;
     30572017 First IEEE International Conference on Robotic Computing (IRC), Taichung, Taiwan, IEEE,
     30582017.
     3059doi:10.1109/irc.2017.39.
     3060<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/irc.2017.39">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/irc.2017.39</a>
     3061<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>This paper describes an industrial cloud robotics distributed application that was executed across a high-speed wide-area network. The application was implemented using ROS libraries and packages. The purpose of the application is to enable an industrial robot to perform surface blending. A Kinect sensor, a surface blending tool and a laser scanner are mounted on the robot arm. The arm is moved under software control to scan a work bench on which metal parts of variable size can be laid out at any orientation. The collected point cloud data is processed by a segmentation algorithm to find the surface boundaries. A Cartesian path planning algorithm is executed to determine paths for the robot arm to execute the blending action and a laser scan on a selected surface. A new ROS package was implemented to collect CPU, memory and bandwidth usage for each significant ROS node in this distributed application. To emulate a scenario in which computing resources at a remote datacenter can be used for the segmentation and path planning algorithms in conjunction with the robots located on a factory floor, a software-defined network testbed called GENI was used to distribute compute-heavy ROS nodes. Measurements show that with TCP tuning, and high-speed end-to-end paths, the total execution time in the Cloud scenario can be reasonably close to a local scenario in which computing is collocated with the robot.
     3062</li>
     3063<br>
     3064
     3065
     3066
     3067<li>
    30143068<b>Rahimi, Reza and Veeraraghavan, M. and Nakajima, Y. and Takahashi, H. and Nakajima, Y. and Okamoto, S. and Yamanaka, N.</b>
    30153069, &quot;A high-performance OpenFlow software switch.&quot;
     
    39754029<li>
    39764030<b>Van Vorst, N. and Erazo, M. and Liu, J.</b>
     4031, &quot;PrimoGENI for hybrid network simulation and emulation experiments in GENI.&quot;
     4032Journal of Simulation,
     40332012.
     4034doi:10.1057/jos.2012.5.
     4035<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/jos.2012.5">http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/jos.2012.5</a>
     4036<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) is a community-driven research and development effort to build a collaborative and exploratory network experimentation platform—a 'virtual laboratory' for the design, implementation, and evaluation of future networks. The PrimoGENI project enables real-time network simulation by extending an existing network simulator to become part of the GENI federation to support large-scale experiments involving physical, simulated, and emulated network entities. In this paper, we describe a novel design of PrimoGENI, which aims at supporting realistic, scalable, and flexible network experiments with real-time simulation and emulation capabilities. We present a flexible emulation infrastructure that allows both remote client machines, local cluster nodes running virtual machines, and external networks to seamlessly interoperate with the simulated network running within a designated 'slice' of resources. We present the results of our preliminary validation and performance studies to demonstrate the capabilities as well as limitations of our approach.
     4037</li>
     4038<br>
     4039
     4040<li>
     4041<b>Van Vorst, N. and Erazo, M. and Liu, J.</b>
    39774042, &quot;PrimoGENI: Integrating Real-Time Network Simulation and Emulation in GENI.&quot;
    39784043Principles of Advanced and Distributed Simulation (PADS), 2011 IEEE Workshop on, Nice, France, IEEE,
     
    39814046<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/pads.2011.5936747">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/pads.2011.5936747</a>
    39824047<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) is a community-driven research and development effort to build a collaborative and exploratory network experimentation platform -- a &#x76;&#x0308;irtual laboratory'' for the design, implementation and evaluation of future networks. The PrimoGENI project enables real-time network simulation by extending an existing network simulator to become part of the GENI federation to support large-scale experiments involving physical, simulated and emulated network entities. In this paper, we describe a novel design of PrimoGENI, which aims at supporting realistic, scalable, and flexible network experiments with real-time simulation and emulation capabilities. We present a flexible emulation infrastructure that allows both remote client machines and local cluster nodes running virtual machines to seamlessly interoperate with the simulated network running within a designated &#x73;&#x0308;lice'' of resources. We show the results of our preliminary validation and performance studies to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of our approach.
    3983 </li>
    3984 <br>
    3985 
    3986 <li>
    3987 <b>Van Vorst, N. and Erazo, M. and Liu, J.</b>
    3988 , &quot;PrimoGENI for hybrid network simulation and emulation experiments in GENI.&quot;
    3989 Journal of Simulation,
    3990 2012.
    3991 doi:10.1057/jos.2012.5.
    3992 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/jos.2012.5">http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/jos.2012.5</a>
    3993 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>The Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) is a community-driven research and development effort to build a collaborative and exploratory network experimentation platform—a 'virtual laboratory' for the design, implementation, and evaluation of future networks. The PrimoGENI project enables real-time network simulation by extending an existing network simulator to become part of the GENI federation to support large-scale experiments involving physical, simulated, and emulated network entities. In this paper, we describe a novel design of PrimoGENI, which aims at supporting realistic, scalable, and flexible network experiments with real-time simulation and emulation capabilities. We present a flexible emulation infrastructure that allows both remote client machines, local cluster nodes running virtual machines, and external networks to seamlessly interoperate with the simulated network running within a designated 'slice' of resources. We present the results of our preliminary validation and performance studies to demonstrate the capabilities as well as limitations of our approach.
    39944048</li>
    39954049<br>
     
    42724326<li>
    42734327<b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
     4328, &quot;Capacity of Inter-cloud Layer-2 Virtual Networking.&quot;
     4329Proceedings of the 2014 ACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, USA, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     43302014.
     4331doi:10.1145/2627566.2627573.
     4332<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2627566.2627573">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2627566.2627573</a>
     4333<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Due to the economy of scale of Ethernet networks and available dynamic circuit capability from the major national research and educational networks, VLAN (Virtual LAN) based virtual networking solution has been successfully adopted in some advanced distributed cloud systems. However, there are two major constraints in this adaptation: (1) dynamic circuit service is far from pervasive; (2) there is only limited VLAN tags offered by regional network service providers. In this paper, after examining layer-2 networking in large-scale distributed cloud environments, we present a graph theoretical model to study the network capacity in terms of the number of inter-cloud connections that can co-exist. We further design the algorithms to achieve this capacity for both point-to-point and multi-point inter-cloud connections in both static and dynamic scenarios. We also study a general topology embedding problem based on this model. As tagging is a common mechanism for isolating communication channels in other network layers, the proposed models and algorithms can be extended to optical and IP networks.
     4334</li>
     4335<br>
     4336
     4337<li>
     4338<b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
    42744339, &quot;Scaling up applications over distributed clouds with dynamic layer-2 exchange and broadcast service.&quot;
    42754340Teletraffic Congress (ITC), 2014 26th International, IEEE,
     
    42784343<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/itc.2014.6932973</a>
    42794344<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>In this paper, we study the problem of provisioning large-scale virtual clusters over federated clouds connected by multi-domain, layer-2 wide area networks. We first present the virtual cluster request abstraction and the abstraction models for substrate resource pools. Based on these two abstraction models, we developed a novel layer-2 exchange mechanism and an implementation of it in a multi-domain networked cloud environment. The design of the mechanism takes into consideration the realistic constraints in current network and cloud systems. We show that efficient cluster splitting, cloud data center selection and resource allocation algorithms can be developed to provision large-scale virtual clusters across cloud sites. A prototype system has been deployed and integrated into the ExoGENI testbed for about a year, and is being heavily used by scientific and data analytic applications.
    4280 </li>
    4281 <br>
    4282 
    4283 <li>
    4284 <b>Xin, Yufeng and Baldin, Ilya and Heermann, Chris and Mandal, Anirban and Ruth, Paul</b>
    4285 , &quot;Capacity of Inter-cloud Layer-2 Virtual Networking.&quot;
    4286 Proceedings of the 2014 ACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Distributed Cloud Computing, Chicago, Illinois, USA, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
    4287 2014.
    4288 doi:10.1145/2627566.2627573.
    4289 <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2627566.2627573">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2627566.2627573</a>
    4290 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Due to the economy of scale of Ethernet networks and available dynamic circuit capability from the major national research and educational networks, VLAN (Virtual LAN) based virtual networking solution has been successfully adopted in some advanced distributed cloud systems. However, there are two major constraints in this adaptation: (1) dynamic circuit service is far from pervasive; (2) there is only limited VLAN tags offered by regional network service providers. In this paper, after examining layer-2 networking in large-scale distributed cloud environments, we present a graph theoretical model to study the network capacity in terms of the number of inter-cloud connections that can co-exist. We further design the algorithms to achieve this capacity for both point-to-point and multi-point inter-cloud connections in both static and dynamic scenarios. We also study a general topology embedding problem based on this model. As tagging is a common mechanism for isolating communication channels in other network layers, the proposed models and algorithms can be extended to optical and IP networks.
    42914345</li>
    42924346<br>
     
    43344388
    43354389<li>
     4390<b>Xiong, Kaiqi and Makati, Mufaddal</b>
     4391, &quot;Assessing End-to-end Performance and Security in Cloud Computing.&quot;
     4392Proceedings of the Symposium on Applied Computing, Marrakech, Morocco, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     43932017.
     4394doi:10.1145/3019612.3019633.
     4395<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/3019612.3019633">http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/3019612.3019633</a>
     4396<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>While most studies are concerned with the network performance and security of data centers in the cloud - a shared computing infrastructure, there is little research on the understanding of the end-to-end performance and security of cloud services offered by cloud providers. That is, while cloud providers promise to deliver cloud services that meet predefined Quality of Services (QoS), there is nowadays a lack of efficient tools for the verification of the performance and security of cloud services a user has received. Such research, however, plays an important role in the successful delivery of cloud services. In this paper, we present a systematic way to evaluate the end-to-end performance and security of cloud services in a shared computing infrastructure. We design and develop an end-to-end SECUrity and Performance assessment framework (SECUPerf), where we experimentally and analytically investigate the performance and security of the routers along the path of cloud services between cloud users and providers. Our experimental results have demonstrated the applicability and usefulness of SECUPerf in the cloud. SECUPerf is useful to all the users in the shared computing infrastructure.
     4397</li>
     4398<br>
     4399
     4400
     4401
     4402<li>
    43364403<b>Xiong, Kaiqi and Pan, Yin</b>
    43374404, &quot;Understanding ProtoGENI in Networking Courses for Research and Education.&quot;
     
    46604727
    46614728<li>
     4729<b>Antequera, Ronny B. and Calyam, Prasad and Chandrashekara, Arjun A. and Malhotra, Shivoam</b>
     4730, &quot;Recommending Resources to Cloud Applications Based on Custom Templates Composition.&quot
     4731Proceedings of the Computing Frontiers Conference, Siena, Italy, ACM, New York, NY, USA,
     47322017.
     4733doi:10.1145/3075564.3075582.
     4734</li>
     4735<br>
     4736
     4737
     4738
     4739<li>
    46624740<b>Antonenko, V. and Smeliansky, R. and Baldin, I. and Izhvanov, Y. and Gugel, Y.</b>
    46634741, &quot;Towards SDI-bases Infrastructure for supporting science in Russia.&quot
     
    49905068
    49915069<li>
     5070<b>Bhat, Shireesh</b>
     5071, &quot;Network Service Orchestration within the ChoiceNet Architecture (Doctoral dissertation).&quot
     5072
     50732017.
     5074
     5075</li>
     5076<br>
     5077
     5078
     5079
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