Changes between Version 23 and Version 24 of GENIBibliography


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Timestamp:
01/21/15 14:58:30 (4 years ago)
Author:
Mark Berman
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  • GENIBibliography

    v23 v24  
    5858<a href="#full-2014">2014</a>&nbsp;
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     60<a href="#full-2015">2015</a>&nbsp;
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    6163<a href="#concise">Jump to concise bibliography</a>
     
    414416
    415417<a href="http://s3.amazonaws.com/marcoy&#x005F;thesis/Thesis.pdf">http://s3.amazonaws.com/marcoy&#x005F;thesis/Thesis.pdf</a>
    416 <br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Computer networking researchers often have access to a few di
    417 erent network testbeds (Section 1.2) for their experiments. However, those testbeds are limited in resources; contentions for resources are prominent in those testbeds especially when conference deadline is looming. Moreover, services running on those testbeds are subject to seasonal and daily trac spikes from users all round the world. Hence, demand for resources at the testbeds are high. Some researchers can use other testbeds in conjunction with the ones they are using. Even though each of the testbeds may have di
    418 erent infrastructures, and characteristics, in the end, what the researchers receive in return is a set of computing resources, either virtual machines or physical machines. Essentially, those testbeds are providing a similar service, but researchers have to manage the credentials for accessing the testbeds manually, and they have to manually request resources from di
    419 erent testbeds in order to setup experiments that span across di
    420 erent testbeds. This thesis presents GENICloud, a project that enables the federation of testbeds with clouds. Computing and storage resources can be provisioned to researchers and services running on existing testbeds dynamically from an Eucalyptus cloud. As a part of the GENICloud project, the user proxy (Section 3.4) provides a less arduous method for testbeds administrators to federate with other testbeds; the same serviceiv also manages researchers credentials, so they do not have to acquire resources from each testbed individually. The user proxy provides a single interface for researchers to interact with di
    421 erent testbeds and clouds and manage their experiments. Furthermore, GENICloud demonstrates that there are, in fact, quite a few architectural similarities between di
    422 erent testbeds and even clouds
     418<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Computer networking researchers often have access to a few dierent network testbeds (Section 1.2) for their experiments. However, those testbeds are limited in resources; contentions for resources are prominent in those testbeds especially when conference deadline is looming. Moreover, services running on those testbeds are subject to seasonal and daily trac spikes from users all round the world. Hence, demand for resources at the testbeds are high. Some researchers can use other testbeds in conjunction with the ones they are using. Even though each of the testbeds may have dierent infrastructures, and characteristics, in the end, what the researchers receive in return is a set of computing resources, either virtual machines or physical machines. Essentially, those testbeds are providing a similar service, but researchers have to manage the credentials for accessing the testbeds manually, and they have to manually request resources from dierent testbeds in order to setup experiments that span across dierent testbeds. This thesis presents GENICloud, a project that enables the federation of testbeds with clouds. Computing and storage resources can be provisioned to researchers and services running on existing testbeds dynamically from an Eucalyptus cloud. As a part of the GENICloud project, the user proxy (Section 3.4) provides a less arduous method for testbeds administrators to federate with other testbeds; the same serviceiv also manages researchers credentials, so they do not have to acquire resources from each testbed individually. The user proxy provides a single interface for researchers to interact with dierent testbeds and clouds and manage their experiments. Furthermore, GENICloud demonstrates that there are, in fact, quite a few architectural similarities between dierent testbeds and even clouds
    423419</li>
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    17781774
    17791775<li>
     1776<b>Antonenko, V. and Smeliansky, R. and Baldin, I. and Izhvanov, Y. and Gugel, Y.</b>
     1777, &quot;Towards SDI-bases Infrastructure for supporting science in Russia.&quot;
     1778Science and Technology Conference (Modern Networking Technologies) (MoNeTeC), 2014 First International, IEEE,
     17792014.
     1780doi:10.1109/monetec.2014.6995576.
     1781<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/monetec.2014.6995576">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/monetec.2014.6995576</a>
     1782<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Modern science presents a number of challenges to the cyber-infrastructure supporting it: heterogeneity of the required computational resources, problems associated with storing, preserving and moving large quantities of information, a collaborative nature of scientific activities requiring shared access to resources, continuously growing requirements for computational power and network bandwidth, and, last, but not least, ease of use. In this position paper we explore a new approach to creating and growing such infrastructure based on the principles of federation, enabled by deep programmability of individual infrastructure elements: Software-Defined Infrastructure (SDI). We describe the evolution of the science infrastructure, open research problems and the concrete steps we are taking towards its realization by building a unique, widely distributed science facility in Russia based on SDI and GENI technologies.
     1783</li>
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     1787
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    17801789<b>Araji, B. and Gurkan, D.</b>
    17811790, &quot;Embedding Switch Number, Port Number, and MAC Address (ESPM) within the IPv6 Address.&quot;
     
    18691878
    18701879<li>
     1880<b>Berman, M. and Brinn, M.</b>
     1881, &quot;Progress and challenges in worldwide federation of future internet and distributed cloud testbeds.&quot;
     1882Science and Technology Conference (Modern Networking Technologies) (MoNeTeC), 2014 First International, IEEE,
     18832014.
     1884doi:10.1109/monetec.2014.6995579.
     1885<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/monetec.2014.6995579">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/monetec.2014.6995579</a>
     1886<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Future Internet and distributed cloud (FIDC) testbeds are rapidly becoming important research and educational resoures worldwide. While FIDC testbeds may be built on diverse technologies, they share the primary capabilities of slicing (virtualized end-to-end configurations of computing, networking, and storage resources) and deep programmability (experimenter programmability of all resources from low level hardware to virtualized components). FIDC testbeds often achieve their deep programmability through software defined networking (SDN) capabilities, which researchers employ both to construct per-application and per-experiment virtual networks, and to intelligently steer traffic throughout the virtual network/cloud environment.
     1887</li>
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     1892<li>
    18711893<b>Berman, Mark and Chase, Jeffrey S. and Landweber, Lawrence and Nakao, Akihiro and Ott, Max and Raychaudhuri, Dipankar and Ricci, Robert and Seskar, Ivan</b>
    18721894, &quot;GENI: A federated testbed for innovative network experiments.&quot;
     
    21552177
    21562178<li>
     2179<b>Mambretti, J. and Chen, J. and Yeh, F.</b>
     2180, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs) and Infrastructure (SDI): Emerging innovations in SDN and SDI interdomain multi-layer services and capabilities.&quot;
     2181Science and Technology Conference (Modern Networking Technologies) (MoNeTeC), 2014 First International, IEEE,
     21822014.
     2183doi:10.1109/monetec.2014.6995590.
     2184<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/monetec.2014.6995590">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/monetec.2014.6995590</a>
     2185<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Software-Defined-Networking (SDN) is quickly transforming the networking landscape. Programmable networking based on many types of virtualization techniques, including SDN, enable high levels of abstraction for network services, control and management functions, and underlying technology resources. These approaches enable network designers to create a much wider range of services and capability, including through Software Defined Networking Exchanges (SDXs) than can be provided with traditional networks and exchange facilities, enabling a) many more dynamic provisioning options, including in real time b) faster implementation of new and enhanced services c) enabling applications, edge processes and even individuals to directly control core resources; e) substantially improved options for creating customizable networks and e) enhanced operational efficiency and effectiveness. In addition, these capabilities are now being extended to other types of Software Defined Infrastructure (SDI), including clouds, compute grids, storage devices, instruments, and many other types of edge devices.
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     2191<li>
    21572192<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    21582193, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot;
     
    24522487
    24532488<li>
     2489<b>Wang, K. C. and Brinn, M. and Mambretti, J.</b>
     2490, &quot;From federated software defined infrastructure to future internet architecture.&quot;
     2491Science and Technology Conference (Modern Networking Technologies) (MoNeTeC), 2014 First International, IEEE,
     24922014.
     2493doi:10.1109/monetec.2014.6995605.
     2494<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/monetec.2014.6995605">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/monetec.2014.6995605</a>
     2495<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Significant efforts have been devoted to creating large scale compute and network testbeds for studying future Internet challenges. Besides large geographic span, the common emphasis is programmability, allowing researchers to reserve or create, via software, flexible sets of compute and network resources over specified topologies to execute research prototypes of new protocols, processes, and applications. Also emphasized are virtualization, instrumentation, and software defined networking (SDN) capabilities of the infrastructure. SDN in particular stimulated significant interests in academia, industry, and public sectors to re-imagine the future computing and networking infrastructure landscape and roadmap while it becomes increasingly utilized in production environments. Amidst these interests, one can start to capture desirable characteristics to glimpse the potential architecture of the future Internet. In this paper, we discuss the significance of compute-network interaction across complex, highly customized federated architecture in the future Internet. Infrastructure federation has been happening across multiple dimensions. Federation expands the scope of infrastructure, geographically and administratively, for use by members of different organizations. For example, federation initiatives are underway among: 1) US Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI), Europe Future Internet Research and Experimentation (FIRE), and future Internet testbeds in Asia, South America, and Canada, 2) university production infrastructure, 3) US cities, 4) US public research institutes, and 5) commercial infrastructure. While requirements and objectives differ, they must all address a common set of issues. Such federation suggests the fundamental needs of applications to interact with compute and network resources across a generic, federated, future Internet environment.
     2496</li>
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     2501<li>
    24542502<b>Wang, Qing and Xu, Ke and Izard, Ryan and Kribbs, Benton and Porter, Joseph and Wang, Kuang-Ching and Prakash, Aditya and Ramanathan, Parmesh</b>
    24552503, &quot;GENI Cinema: An SDN-Assisted Scalable Live Video Streaming Service.&quot;
     
    25612609<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/gree.2014.8">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/gree.2014.8</a>
    25622610<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>After several spirals of development, GENI has evolved into a rich-featured environment with comprehensive support. Researchers have started to use it as a testing environment for their research projects, as evidenced by new GENI projects on shakedown experiments. However, it is not clear what we can expect from the GENI testbeds from a performance perspective. Some fundamental questions we can ask are: What are the bandwidth and latency of a link that connects two VMs from two different GENI aggregates? Do they change a lot over time? What kind of distribution do they follow? Are they aggregate dependent? The goal of this study is to characterize the links of the GENI networks and provide guidance to GENI experimenters. The information collected can be helpful for designing GENI experiments in selecting where resources should be reserved.
     2611</li>
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     2617<b>Zink, M.</b>
     2618, &quot;A measurement architecture for Software Defined Exchanges.&quot;
     2619Science and Technology Conference (Modern Networking Technologies) (MoNeTeC), 2014 First International, IEEE,
     26202014.
     2621doi:10.1109/monetec.2014.6995606.
     2622<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/monetec.2014.6995606">http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/monetec.2014.6995606</a>
     2623<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Prototype deployments of Software Defined Exchanges (SDX) have recently come into existence as a platform for Future Internet architecture to eliminate the need for core routing technology used in today's Internet. In this paper, we motivate the need for an adequate measurement architecture for such SDXes to be able to evaluate their performance and inform further development. We present the major requirements for this architecture, introduce the idea of SDX and its first prototypes, and give an overview on a SDX measurement experiment we recently conducted.
     2624</li>
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     2629<br>
     2630<a id="full-2015"><H2>GENI Publications for 2015</H2></a>
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     2633<li>
     2634<b>Mukherjee, Shreyasee and Baid, Akash and Raychaudhuri, Dipankar</b>
     2635, &quot;Integrating Advanced Mobility Services into the Future Internet Architecture.&quot;
     26367th International Conference on COMmunication Systems &#x0026; NETworkS (COMSNETS 2015), Bangalore,
     26372015.
     2638
     2639<a href="http://winlab.rutgers.edu/&#x73;&#x0303;hreya/comsnets.pdf">http://winlab.rutgers.edu/&#x73;&#x0303;hreya/comsnets.pdf</a>
     2640<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>This paper discusses the design challenges associated with supporting advanced mobility services in the future Internet. The recent transition of the Internet from the fixed host-server model to one in which mobile platforms are the norm motivates a next-generation protocol architecture which provides integrated and efficient support for advanced mobility services. Key wireless access and mobility usage scenarios are identified including host mobility, multihoming, vehicular access and context addressability, and key protocol support requirements are identified in each case. The MobilityFirst (MF) architecture being developed under the National Science Foundation's future Internet Architecture (FIA) program is proposed as a possible realization that meets the identified requirements. MF protocol specifics are given for each wireless/mobile use case, along with sample evaluation results demonstrating achievable performance benefits.
     2641</li>
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     2646<li>
     2647<b>\\Oz&#x63;&#x0327;elik, &#x49;&#x0307;lker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
     2648, &quot;Deceiving entropy based DoS detection.&quot;
     2649Computers &#x0026; Security,
     26502015.
     2651doi:10.1016/j.cose.2014.10.013.
     2652<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cose.2014.10.013">http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cose.2014.10.013</a>
     2653<br><br><b>Abstract: </b>Denial of Service (DoS) attacks disable network services for legitimate users. As a result of growing dependence on the Internet by both the general public and service providers, the availability of Internet services has become a concern. While DoS attacks cause inconvenience for users, and revenue loss for service providers; their effects on critical infrastructures like the smart grid and public utilities could be catastrophic. For example, an attack on a smart grid system can cause cascaded power failures and lead to a major blackout. Researchers have proposed approaches for detecting these attacks in the past decade. Anomaly based DoS detection is the most common. The detector uses network traffic statistics; such as the entropy of incoming packet header fields (e.g. source IP addresses or protocol type). It calculates the observed statistical feature and triggers an alarm if an extreme deviation occurs. Entropy features are common in recent DDoS detection publications. They are also one of the most effective features for detecting these attacks. However, intrusion detection systems (IDS) using entropy based detection approaches can be a victim of spoofing attacks. An attacker can sniff the network and calculate background traffic entropy before a (D)DoS attack starts. They can then spoof attack packets to keep the entropy value in the expected range during the attack. This paper explains the vulnerability of entropy based network monitoring systems. We present a proof of concept entropy spoofing attack and show that by exploiting this vulnerability, the attacker can avoid detection or degrade detection performance to an unacceptable level.
    25632654</li>
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    25902681<a href="#concise-2014">2014</a>&nbsp;
    25912682
     2683<a href="#concise-2015">2015</a>&nbsp;
     2684
    25922685<br>
    25932686<a href="#full">Jump to full bibliography</a>
     
    40464139
    40474140<li>
     4141<b>Antonenko, V. and Smeliansky, R. and Baldin, I. and Izhvanov, Y. and Gugel, Y.</b>
     4142, &quot;Towards SDI-bases Infrastructure for supporting science in Russia.&quot
     4143Science and Technology Conference (Modern Networking Technologies) (MoNeTeC), 2014 First International, IEEE,
     41442014.
     4145doi:10.1109/monetec.2014.6995576.
     4146</li>
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    40484152<b>Araji, B. and Gurkan, D.</b>
    40494153, &quot;Embedding Switch Number, Port Number, and MAC Address (ESPM) within the IPv6 Address.&quot
     
    41234227
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     4229<b>Berman, M. and Brinn, M.</b>
     4230, &quot;Progress and challenges in worldwide federation of future internet and distributed cloud testbeds.&quot
     4231Science and Technology Conference (Modern Networking Technologies) (MoNeTeC), 2014 First International, IEEE,
     42322014.
     4233doi:10.1109/monetec.2014.6995579.
     4234</li>
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     4239<li>
    41254240<b>Berman, Mark and Chase, Jeffrey S. and Landweber, Lawrence and Nakao, Akihiro and Ott, Max and Raychaudhuri, Dipankar and Ricci, Robert and Seskar, Ivan</b>
    41264241, &quot;GENI: A federated testbed for innovative network experiments.&quot
     
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    43664481<li>
     4482<b>Mambretti, J. and Chen, J. and Yeh, F.</b>
     4483, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs) and Infrastructure (SDI): Emerging innovations in SDN and SDI interdomain multi-layer services and capabilities.&quot
     4484Science and Technology Conference (Modern Networking Technologies) (MoNeTeC), 2014 First International, IEEE,
     44852014.
     4486doi:10.1109/monetec.2014.6995590.
     4487</li>
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    43674493<b>Mambretti, Joe and Chen, Jim and Yeh, Fei</b>
    43684494, &quot;Software-Defined Network Exchanges (SDXs): Architecture, services, capabilities, and foundation technologies.&quot
     
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    46174743<li>
     4744<b>Wang, K. C. and Brinn, M. and Mambretti, J.</b>
     4745, &quot;From federated software defined infrastructure to future internet architecture.&quot
     4746Science and Technology Conference (Modern Networking Technologies) (MoNeTeC), 2014 First International, IEEE,
     47472014.
     4748doi:10.1109/monetec.2014.6995605.
     4749</li>
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    46184755<b>Wang, Qing and Xu, Ke and Izard, Ryan and Kribbs, Benton and Porter, Joseph and Wang, Kuang-Ching and Prakash, Aditya and Ramanathan, Parmesh</b>
    46194756, &quot;GENI Cinema: An SDN-Assisted Scalable Live Video Streaming Service.&quot
     
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     4851<li>
     4852<b>Zink, M.</b>
     4853, &quot;A measurement architecture for Software Defined Exchanges.&quot
     4854Science and Technology Conference (Modern Networking Technologies) (MoNeTeC), 2014 First International, IEEE,
     48552014.
     4856doi:10.1109/monetec.2014.6995606.
     4857</li>
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     4863<a id="concise-2015"><H2>GENI Publications for 2015</H2></a>
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     4867<b>Mukherjee, Shreyasee and Baid, Akash and Raychaudhuri, Dipankar</b>
     4868, &quot;Integrating Advanced Mobility Services into the Future Internet Architecture.&quot
     48697th International Conference on COMmunication Systems &#x0026; NETworkS (COMSNETS 2015), Bangalore,
     48702015.
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     4878<b>\\Oz&#x63;&#x0327;elik, &#x49;&#x0307;lker and Brooks, Richard R.</b>
     4879, &quot;Deceiving entropy based DoS detection.&quot
     4880Computers &#x0026; Security,
     48812015.
     4882doi:10.1016/j.cose.2014.10.013.
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