Changes between Version 4 and Version 5 of GEC21Agenda/EveningDemoSession


Ignore:
Timestamp:
09/30/14 10:36:59 (5 years ago)
Author:
peter.stickney@bbn.com
Comment:

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  • GEC21Agenda/EveningDemoSession

    v4 v5  
    9696  * Xiaodan Zhang, zhangxiaodan@cstnet.cn, Chinese Academy of Sciences
    9797
     98==== Network Functions Virtualization using ProtoRINA ====
     99
     100Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) aims to implement network functions as software instead of dedicated physical devices (middleboxes), and recently it has attracted a lot of attention. NFV is inherently supported by our RINA architecture, and a Virtual Network Function (VNF) can be easily added onto existing networks. In this demo, we demonstrate how ProtoRINA can be used to support RINA-based NFV.
     101
     102Participants:
     103  * Ibrahim Matta, matta@bu.edu, Boston University
     104
     105==== GENI Science Shakedown ====
     106
     107This demo will feature recent developments from the GENI Science Shakedown project. Specifically, we will show the ADCIRC Storm Surge model (MPI) running across several GENI racks. In addition, we will show new ExoGENI features.
     108
     109Participants:
     110  * Paul Ruth, pruth@renci.org, RENCI
     111
     112=== Federation / International Projects ===
     113
    98114==== GENI Cinema ====
    99115
     
    109125  * Parmesh Ramanathan, parmesh@ece.wisc.edu, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison
    110126
    111 ==== Network Functions Virtualization using ProtoRINA ====
     127==== SDXs-Software Defined Network Exchanges Inter Domain Prototype ====
    112128
    113 Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) aims to implement network functions as software instead of dedicated physical devices (middleboxes), and recently it has attracted a lot of attention. NFV is inherently supported by our RINA architecture, and a Virtual Network Function (VNF) can be easily added onto existing networks. In this demo, we demonstrate how ProtoRINA can be used to support RINA-based NFV.
     129This !Poster/Demo will demonstrate SDXs inter domain prototype underway at !StarLight. This includes the !StarLight GENI AM, vNode Slice Exchange Point, OpenFlow for NSI(ofNSI) and other inter domain control integration at !StarLight. The vNode/Slice Exchange Point(SEP) team will also demonstrate the SDX GK integration between vNode/SEP and SDXs. We will also show the SOX and !StarLight SDXs integration extend to other domains.
    114130
    115131Participants:
    116   * Ibrahim Matta, matta@bu.edu, Boston University
     132  * Jim Chen, jim-chen@northwestern.edu, Northwestern Univ
     133  * Joe Mambretti, j-mambretti@northwestern.edu, Northwestern Univ
     134  * Fei Yeh, fyeh@northwestern.edu, Northwestern Univ
    117135
    118 === Federation / International Projects ===
    119136
    120137==== VNode, FLARE, SDX ====
     
    142159Participants:
    143160  * yuehua.research@gmail.com
     161
     162==== Integrating GENI/Wireless with Emerging Connected Vehicle and Intelligent Transportation Systems ====
     163
     164 An OpenFlow-based handover and mobility solution for connected vehicles. A handover can occur on a device on a vehicle when it changes network interfaces or when an interface attaches to a new point on the edge. Traditionally, device mobility has been made possible with various mobile IP solutions. Clemson University was tasked by GENI to create a testbed to support handover and mobility experiments with IPv4. Our solution is entirely OpenFlow-based and includes components onboard the client device and within the network edge and core. The demonstration at GEC21 shows how the various OpenFlow components interact and are used to allow a client device to switch interfaces without disrupting the application layer.
     165
     166Scenario 1: Vehicles run one application that requires continuous network connection, e.g., video conference. However, while moving on road, the vehicle may move out of the coverage of currently connected network. Since other networks may exist, the vehicle would wish to be able to transparently switch to another available network. In this demo, we show how the SDN based scheme can enable smooth and transparent handoff to another network without disturbing the performance of the running application.
     167
     168Scenario 2: Vehicles will operate two applications. One will be uploading or downloading real-time or video-on-demand streamed data. The second application will be a safety related application. Emerging applications such as collision avoidance will require periods certain type of control messages to be sent from the vehicle or to the vehicle with a high strict network service quality requirements. While these applications are well suited for DSRC vehicle-to-infrastructure deployment areas, it is clear that DSRC networks are unable to scale (both geographically and by the number of participating nodes). Thus, in this demo, we will show how the two applications can transparently switch between different networks with the support of the SDN based handoff solution, so that their requirements on network service quality and robustness can be satisfied.
     169
     170Participants:
     171  * Kang Chen, kangc@g.clemson.edu, Clemson Univ.
     172  * Jim Martin, JMARTY@clemson.edu, Clemson Univ.
     173  * Kuang-Ching Wang, kwang@clemson.edu, Clemson Univ.
     174
     175==== GENI Enabling an Ecological Science Community ====
     176
     177The University of Wisconsin-Madison's GENI WiMAX installations have extended to the Kemp Natural Resource Station in northern Wisconsin. We are GENI enabling the research facility of ecology students and field classes for research connectivity out in the forest and lake areas. This demo shows the current infrastructure, planned research sites, and video coverage at Kemp.
     178
     179Participants:
     180  * Derek Meyer, dmeyer@cs.wisc.edu, Wisconsin Wireless and NetworkinG Systems (WiNGS) Laboratory