Changes between Version 19 and Version 20 of GEC13Agenda/ExperimenterWorkflowTutorial/Tutorial


Ignore:
Timestamp:
03/13/12 01:15:10 (7 years ago)
Author:
nriga@bbn.com
Comment:

--

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  • GEC13Agenda/ExperimenterWorkflowTutorial/Tutorial

    v19 v20  
    661661== 2. Login to the nodes --- Omni Scripting ==
    662662
    663 After reserving the nodes, you are ready to login. When reserving !PlanetLab
    664 resources, using a different clearinghouse, the login name that should be used
    665 to access the nodes is ''''not'''' the username. The username is listed as part
    666 of the sliverstatus call. For common functionality like this that is expected to
    667 be used often, omni gives you the capability of writing scripts and including
    668 omni as a library.
    669 Under omni_tutorial there is a folder 'example_scripts' that includes example
    670 python scripts that use Omni. One script that is available is the
    671 ''getMyLogin.py'' script that will return the exact command for logging-in to
    672 your nodes.
     663After reserving the nodes, you are ready to login. When reserving !PlanetLab resources, using a ProtoGENI clearinghouse, the login name that should be used to access the nodes is ''''not'''' the username. The login is listed as part of the sliverstatus call. For common functionality like this that is expected to be used often, omni gives you the capability of writing scripts and including omni as a library.
     664Under the /home/geni/gcf directory there is a folder 'examples' that includes example python scripts that use Omni. One script that is available is the
     665''readyToLogin.py'' script that will return the exact command for logging-in to your nodes.
    673666{{{
    674667readyToLogin -a <AM_NICKNAME> sliceomni##
    675668}}}
    676669
    677 The script will return the actual command that you would need to use for logging
    678 in.
     670The script will return the actual command that you would need to use for logging in.
    679671
    680672For gpousr21 the script would return :
     
    686678  boot
    687679Login using:
    688   xterm -e ssh -i ./ssh/geni_key
    689 pgenigpolabbbncom_gposlice21@bain.gpolab.bbn.com &
     680  xterm -e ssh -i ./ssh/geni_key pgenigpolabbbncom_gposlice21@bain.gpolab.bbn.com &
    690681
    691682================================================================================
     
    706697
    707698== 3. Test Different Topologies  ==
    708 The Mesoscaly deployment can offer, different topologies even if the
    709 communication is between the same hosts. We have provisioned
    710 two different subnets in the Mesoscale infrastructure, each using a different
    711 VLAN (one using 3715 and the other 3716).
     699The Mesoscale deployment can offer different topologies for communicating between hosts. We have provisioned two different subnets in the Mesoscale infrastructure, each using a different VLAN (one using 3715 and the other 3716).
    712700
    713701The two subnets that have been provisioned are '''10.42.144.0/24''' on 3715 and
     
    716704First of all let's see how we can figure out the IP of the hosts we reserved :
    717705
    718    * List all the interfaces in your host. You will see that there are many
    719 interfaces of the form eth1.XXXX
     706   * List all the interfaces on your host. You will see that there are many interfaces of the form eth1.XXXX
    720707   {{{
    721708   /sbin/ifconfig
     
    732719   }}}
    733720
    734    * Figure out the last octet of the IP address of your hosts. The way these
    735 MyPLC hosts are setup, is that they have multiple subinterfaces, each configured
    736 to be part of a different IP subnet. Almost all subnets in the hosts are in the
    737 form of 10.42.Y.0/24. You will notice that for all these subnets, your host has
    738 the same last octet.  In the example above all the subinterfaces of eth1, will
    739 have an IP address that will end in '''90''' (10.42.147.'''90''',
    740 10.42.148.'''90''')
     721   * Figure out the last octet of the IP address of your hosts. The way these MyPLC hosts are setup, is that they have multiple subinterfaces, each configured to be part of a different IP subnet. Almost all subnets in the hosts are in the form of 10.42.Y.0/24. You will notice that for all these subnets, your host has the same last octet.  In the example above all the subinterfaces of eth1, will have an IP address that will end in '''90''' (10.42.147.'''90''', 10.42.148.'''90''')
    741722
    742723   * Ping over 3715. After loging in to your hosts ping from host1 to host2.