Changes between Version 67 and Version 68 of ExperimenterPortal


Ignore:
Timestamp:
05/09/11 15:58:46 (8 years ago)
Author:
Vic Thomas
Comment:

--

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
Modified
  • ExperimenterPortal

    v67 v68  
    22= Experimentation with GENI =
    33
    4 == 1.0 Why GENI? ==
     4== 1  Why GENI? ==
    55GENI might be right for you if your experiment requires:
    66  * ''More resources than would ordinarily be found in your lab.''  Since GENI is a suite of infrastructures it can potentially provide you with more resources than is typically found in any one laboratory.  This is especially true for compute resources: GENI provides access to large testbeds with hundreds of PCs and to cloud computing resources.
     
    1111[[BR]]
    1212
    13 == 2.0 An Experimenter's View of GENI ==
     13== 2  An Experimenter's View of GENI ==
    1414
    1515GENI is a suite of infrastructures for networking and distributed systems experimentation.  GENI supports at-scale experimentation on shared, heterogeneous, highly instrumented infrastructure and enables deep programmability throughout the network.
     
    2626[[BR]]
    2727
    28 == 3.0 GENI Aggregates ==
     28== 3  GENI Resources ==
    2929The following table lists GENI aggregates that are currently available for use by experimenters and the networks (GENI backbone network or the Internet) to which they connect.  GENI has two backbone networks: [http://www.internet2.edu/ Internet2] and [http://www.nlr.net/ National Lambda Rail (NLR)].  The Internet2 backbone provides 1Gbps of dedicated bandwidth for GENI experiments and the NLR backbone provides up to 30Gbps of non-dedicated  bandwidth.   Some aggregates that connect to GENI backbone networks may be connected to other resources on the network using Layer 2 VLANS, giving experimenters the option of running non-IP based Layer 3 and above protocols.  Experimenters wishing to connect Internet2 connected resources to NLR connected resources may do so using switches in Atlanta .
    3030
    31 === 3.1 GENI aggregates currently available to experimenters ===
    32 ==== 3.1.1 Programmable Hosts ====
     31
     32=== 3.1 Picking Resources for Your Experiment ===
     33As you plan your experiment you will want to consider:
     34  * ''The degree of control you need over your experiment.''  Do you need to tightly control the resources (CPU, bandwidth, etc.) allocated to your experiment or will best-effort suffice.  If you need a tightly controlled environment you might want to consider the U. of Utah ProtoGENI aggregate that allocate entire PCs that can be connected in arbitrary topologies.
     35  * ''The desired network topology.''  Does your experiment have to be geographically distributed?  What kinds of connectivity do you need between these geographically distributed locations.  Almost all aggregates can connect using IP connectivity over the Internet.   Many aggregates connect to one of the GENI backbones and allow you to set up IP connections with other resources on the backbone.  This will give you a bit more control over the network.   Some aggregates provide Layer 2 connectivity over a GENI backbone i.e. you can set up vlans between these aggregates and other resources on the backbone network.  This allows you to run non-IP protocols across between the aggregate and other resources.
     36  * ''The desired control over network flows.''  If you need to manage network traffic to/from an aggregate you might want to use aggregates that connect to a GENI backbone using OpenFlow switches or set up vlans to these aggregates through the ProtoGENI Backbone Nodes or the SPP Nodes.
     37  * ''The number of resources you need from an aggregate.''  Aggregates vary from small installations such as the GPO Lab ProtoGENI aggregate that consists of eleven nodes to the PlanetLab and ProtoGENI aggregates that consist of hundreds of nodes.
     38  * ''Support for the GENI Aggregate Manager API.'' Aggregates that support the GENI Aggregate Manager API generally recognize credentials issued by one of the GENI Clearinghouses.  Aggregates that do not will likely require you to get an account from them.   Additionally, a growing number of GENI experiment control tools support the GENI API i.e. these tools can be used to create slices, add resources from aggregates that support the GENI API, etc.  Examples of such tools include the [http://www.protogeni.net/trac/protogeni/wiki/MapInterface ProtoGENI Tools], [http://trac.gpolab.bbn.com/gcf/wiki/Omni  Omni] and [http://gush.cs.williams.edu/trac/gush Gush].
     39
     40The GENI Project Office is happy to help find the best match of resources for your experiments.  Please contact [mailto:help@geni.net] for assistance.
     41[[BR]]
     42[[BR]]
     43
     44== 4  Experimenter Tools ==
     45
     46=== 4.1 Experiment Control Tools ===
     47GENI experiment control tools are used to create slices, add or remove resources to slices, and delete slices.  Some tools may also help with the installation of experimenter specified software into resources in slices; starting, pausing, resuming and stopping the execution of an experiment; and monitoring of the resources in slices for failures.  Examples of GENI experiment control tools include [http://gush.cs.williams.edu/trac/gush Gush], [http://trac.gpolab.bbn.com/gcf/wiki/Omni  Omni],  [http://www.cs.princeton.edu/~jrex/gew/gew-sfi.ppt PlanetLab SFI] and [http://www.protogeni.net/trac/protogeni/wiki/MapInterface ProtoGENI Tools].
     48
     49In addition to these experiment control tools, individual aggregates provide experimenters with additional tools to install and manage software on their resources.  For example, the Million Node GENI aggregate  provides a set of tools to manage the virtual machines it proves as computing resources.
     50
     51=== 4.2 Instrumentation and Measurement Tools ===
     52GENI instrumentation tools are currently aggregate specific.  Examples of such tools include [http://www.netlab.uky.edu/p/instools Instrumentation Tools] for the Kentucky ProtoGENI aggregate, [http://raven.cs.arizona.edu/projects/project Owl] for the !PlanetLab aggregate and [http://mytestbed.net/wiki/omf/Introduction OMF/OML] for the ORBIT aggregate.
     53[[BR]]
     54[[BR]]
     55
     56== 5 Getting Access to GENI ==
     57To use GENI for experimentation please contact [mailto:help@geni.net help@geni.net].
     58[[BR]]
     59[[BR]]
     60
     61== 6 Tutorials ==
     62For a tutorial on using [http://trac.gpolab.bbn.com/gcf/wiki/Omni Omni tools] to run experiments on GENI, see [http://groups.geni.net/geni/wiki/GENIExperimenter].
     63
     64For a tutorial on using ProtoGENI Tools to run experiments on GENI, see [http://www.protogeni.net/trac/protogeni/wiki/Tutorial].
     65[[BR]]
     66[[BR]]
     67
     68== 7 GENI aggregates currently available to experimenters ==
     69=== 7.1 Programmable Hosts ===
    3370{{{
    3471#!html
     
    102139}}}
    103140
    104 ==== 3.1.2 Programmable Networks ====
     141=== 7.2 Programmable Networks ===
    105142{{{
    106143#!html
     
    184221}}}
    185222
    186 ==== 3.1.2 Wireless Testbeds ====
     223=== 7.3 Wireless Testbeds ===
    187224{{{
    188225#!html
     
    220257}}}
    221258
    222 ==== 3.1.3 Specialized Aggregates ====
     259=== 7.4 Specialized Aggregates ===
    223260{{{
    224261#!html
     
    264301<p style="font-size:x-small;">GENI Aggregate Providers: Please report errors and omissions in the table above to <a href="mailto:vthomas@bbn.com"> Vic Thomas </a></p>
    265302}}}
    266 
    267 === 3.2 GENI aggregates that will be available soon, with links to their GENI project page ===
     303[[BR]]
     304[[BR]]
     305
     306== 8.0 GENI aggregates that will be available soon, with links to their GENI project page ==
    268307       || [http://groups.geni.net/geni/wiki/GpENI GpENI] || Network testbed centered on a Midwest US regional optical network between The University of Kansas, Kansas State University, University of Nebraska – Lincoln, and University of Missouri – Kansas City, supported with optical switches from Ciena interconnected by Qwest fiber infrastructure. ||
    269308       || [http://groups.geni.net/geni/wiki/GENICloud GENICloud] || Brings !OpenCirrus and Ecalyptus-based cloud computing resources to GENI experimenters. ||
     
    281320
    282321
    283 === 3.3 Picking Resources for Your Experiment ===
    284 As you plan your experiment you will want to consider:
    285   * ''The degree of control you need over your experiment.''  Do you need to tightly control the resources (CPU, bandwidth, etc.) allocated to your experiment or will best-effort suffice.  If you need a tightly controlled environment you might want to consider the U. of Utah ProtoGENI aggregate that allocate entire PCs that can be connected in arbitrary topologies.
    286   * ''The desired network topology.''  Does your experiment have to be geographically distributed?  What kinds of connectivity do you need between these geographically distributed locations.  Almost all aggregates can connect using IP connectivity over the Internet.   Many aggregates connect to one of the GENI backbones and allow you to set up IP connections with other resources on the backbone.  This will give you a bit more control over the network.   Some aggregates provide Layer 2 connectivity over a GENI backbone i.e. you can set up vlans between these aggregates and other resources on the backbone network.  This allows you to run non-IP protocols across between the aggregate and other resources.
    287   * ''The desired control over network flows.''  If you need to manage network traffic to/from an aggregate you might want to use aggregates that connect to a GENI backbone using OpenFlow switches or set up vlans to these aggregates through the ProtoGENI Backbone Nodes or the SPP Nodes.
    288   * ''The number of resources you need from an aggregate.''  Aggregates vary from small installations such as the GPO Lab ProtoGENI aggregate that consists of eleven nodes to the PlanetLab and ProtoGENI aggregates that consist of hundreds of nodes.
    289   * ''Support for the GENI Aggregate Manager API.'' Aggregates that support the GENI Aggregate Manager API generally recognize credentials issued by one of the GENI Clearinghouses.  Aggregates that do not will likely require you to get an account from them.   Additionally, a growing number of GENI experiment control tools support the GENI API i.e. these tools can be used to create slices, add resources from aggregates that support the GENI API, etc.  Examples of such tools include the [http://www.protogeni.net/trac/protogeni/wiki/MapInterface ProtoGENI Tools], [http://trac.gpolab.bbn.com/gcf/wiki/Omni  Omni] and [http://gush.cs.williams.edu/trac/gush Gush].
    290 
    291 The GENI Project Office is happy to help find the best match of resources for your experiments.  Please contact [mailto:help@geni.net] for assistance.
    292 [[BR]]
    293 [[BR]]
    294 
    295 == 4.0 Experimenter Tools ==
    296 
    297 === 4.1 Experiment Control Tools ===
    298 GENI experiment control tools are used to create slices, add or remove resources to slices, and delete slices.  Some tools may also help with the installation of experimenter specified software into resources in slices; starting, pausing, resuming and stopping the execution of an experiment; and monitoring of the resources in slices for failures.  Examples of GENI experiment control tools include [http://gush.cs.williams.edu/trac/gush Gush], [http://trac.gpolab.bbn.com/gcf/wiki/Omni  Omni],  [http://www.cs.princeton.edu/~jrex/gew/gew-sfi.ppt PlanetLab SFI] and [http://www.protogeni.net/trac/protogeni/wiki/MapInterface ProtoGENI Tools].
    299 
    300 In addition to these experiment control tools, individual aggregates provide experimenters with additional tools to install and manage software on their resources.  For example, the Million Node GENI aggregate  provides a set of tools to manage the virtual machines it proves as computing resources.
    301 
    302 === 4.2 Instrumentation and Measurement Tools ===
    303 GENI instrumentation tools are currently aggregate specific.  Examples of such tools include [http://www.netlab.uky.edu/p/instools Instrumentation Tools] for the Kentucky ProtoGENI aggregate, [http://raven.cs.arizona.edu/projects/project Owl] for the !PlanetLab aggregate and [http://mytestbed.net/wiki/omf/Introduction OMF/OML] for the ORBIT aggregate.
    304 [[BR]]
    305 [[BR]]
    306 
    307 == 5.0 Getting Access to GENI ==
    308 To use GENI for experimentation please contact [mailto:help@geni.net help@geni.net].
    309 [[BR]]
    310 [[BR]]
    311 
    312 == 6.0 Tutorials ==
    313 For a tutorial on using [http://trac.gpolab.bbn.com/gcf/wiki/Omni Omni tools] to run experiments on GENI, see [http://groups.geni.net/geni/wiki/GENIExperimenter].
    314 
    315 For a tutorial on using ProtoGENI Tools to run experiments on GENI, see [http://www.protogeni.net/trac/protogeni/wiki/Tutorial].
    316 
    317