Changes between Version 45 and Version 46 of ExperimenterPortal


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Timestamp:
03/11/11 22:01:23 (8 years ago)
Author:
Vic Thomas
Comment:

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  • ExperimenterPortal

    v45 v46  
    33
    44== 1.0 Why GENI? ==
    5 GENI might be right  for your experiment if:
    6   * Your experiment requires more resources than would ordinarily be found in your lab.  Since GENI is a suite of infrastructures it can potentially provide you with more resources than is typically found in any one laboratory.  This is especially true for compute resources: GENI provides access to large testbeds with hundreds of PCs and to cloud computing resources.
    7   * Your experiment requires non-IP connectivity across resources.  Some GENI aggregates allow you to set up Layer 2 connections between resources within the aggregate.  Experimenters may install and run their own Layer 3 and above protocols on these resources.  It is also possible to setup Layer 2 connections between many GENI aggregates that connect to GENI backbone networks (Internet2 and NLR).  You can even set up your network to route through experimenter programmable switches in the GENI backbone.
    8   * Your experiment requires requires geographically distributed resources.  Some GENI aggregates include resources distributed around the world.
     5GENI might be right  for your experiment if your experiment requires:
     6  * ''More resources than would ordinarily be found in your lab.''  Since GENI is a suite of infrastructures it can potentially provide you with more resources than is typically found in any one laboratory.  This is especially true for compute resources: GENI provides access to large testbeds with hundreds of PCs and to cloud computing resources.
     7  * ''Non-IP connectivity across resources.''  Some GENI aggregates allow you to set up Layer 2 connections between resources within the aggregate.  Experimenters may install and run their own Layer 3 and above protocols on these resources.  It is also possible to setup Layer 2 connections between many GENI aggregates that connect to GENI backbone networks (Internet2 and NLR).  You can even set up your network to route through experimenter programmable switches in the GENI backbone.
     8  * ''A deeply programmable network.'' GENI has switches in the backbone and at the edges that you can program to set up the network topologies you need and to control flows in your network.
     9  * ''Geographically distributed resources.''  Some GENI resources are distributed around the world.
     10  * ''Reproducibility.'' You can get exclusive access to certain GENI resources including CPU resources and network resources.  This gives you control over your experiment's environment and hence the ability for you and others to repeat experiments under identical or very similar conditions.
    911[[BR]]
    1012
     
    1315GENI is a suite of infrastructures for networking and distributed systems experimentation.  GENI supports at-scale experimentation on shared, heterogeneous, highly instrumented infrastructure and enables deep programmability throughout the network.
    1416
    15 As an experimenter you will need to know about GENI ''clearinghouses'' and GENI ''aggregates''.  A GENI clearinghouse authenticates experimenters and issues them credentials needed to obtain GENI resources for experimentation. 
    16 
    17 GENI aggregates provide resources to experimenters with GENI credentials.  GENI has a number of different aggregates that provide a variety of resources for experimentation.  An important aspect of planning your experiment is deciding what resources you need (type and numbers) and which aggregates might meet your needs.
     17As an experimenter you will need to know about GENI ''clearinghouses'' and GENI ''aggregates''.  A GENI ''clearinghouse'' authenticates experimenters and issues them credentials needed to obtain GENI resources for experimentation. 
     18
     19GENI ''aggregates'' provide resources to experimenters with GENI credentials.  GENI has a number of different aggregates that provide a variety of resources for experimentation.  An important aspect of planning your experiment is deciding what resources you need (type and numbers) and which aggregates might meet your needs.
    1820
    1921The following figure illustrates the role of GENI clearinghouses and aggregates:
     
    100102                <td> MAC layer and above programmable by experimenter.  Topology control by changing transmit power levels and noise floor.  </td>
    101103                <td>  Yes </td>
    102                 <td> ??? </td>
     104                <td> </td>
    103105                <td> <a href="http://mytestbed.net/wiki/omf/Introduction">  OMF Tools </a></td>
    104106        </tr>
     
    213215       || [http://groups.geni.net/geni/wiki/Mid-Atlantic%20Crossroads MAX] || Regional optical network consisting of wavelength-selectable switches, 10Gbps Ethernet switches, and virtual machines. ||
    214216       || [http://groups.geni.net/geni/wiki/CmuLab CMU Wireless Emulator] || A wireless network emulator that accurately emulates wireless signal propagation in a physical space. ||
    215        || ORCA/BEN || Network consisting of several segments of dark fiber and includes a reconfigurable fiber switch (layer 0) to generate different physical topologies, out of band network management to access equipment at PoPs and remote power management for resetting and powering down of experimental equipment. ||
     217       || ORCA/BEN || Network consisting of several segments of dark fiber and includes a reconfigurable fiber switch (layer 0) to generate different physical topologies, out of band network management to access equipment at !PoPs and remote power management for resetting and powering down of experimental equipment. ||
    216218       || [http://groups.geni.net/geni/wiki/DICLOUD Data Intensive Cloud] || Cloud-based environment for data-intensive experiments from start (the data collection point) to finish (processing and archiving). ||
    217219       || [http://groups.geni.net/geni/wiki/WIMXRG Rutgers WiMAX] || GENI-enabled WiMAX base station at Rutgers University||
     
    224226=== 3.3 Picking Resources for Your Experiment ===
    225227As you plan your experiment you will want to consider:
    226   * The degree of control you need over your experiment.  Do you need to tightly control the resources (CPU, bandwidth, etc.) allocated to your experiment or will best-effort suffice.  If you need a tightly controlled environment you might want to consider the U. of Utah ProtoGENI aggregate that allocate entire PCs that can be connected in arbitrary topologies.
    227   * The desired network topology.  Does your experiment have to be geographically distributed?  What kinds of connectivity do you need between these geographically distributed locations.  Almost all aggregates can connect using IP connectivity over the Internet.   Many aggregates connect to one of the GENI backbones and allow you to set up IP connections with other resources on the backbone.  This will give you a bit more control over the network.   Some aggregates provide Layer 2 connectivity over a GENI backbone i.e. you can set up vlans between these aggregates and other resources on the backbone network.  This allows you to run non-IP protocols across between the aggregate and other resources.
    228   * The desired control over network flows.  If you need to manage network traffic to/from an aggregate you might want to use aggregates that connect to a GENI backbone using OpenFlow switches.
    229   * The number of resources you need from an aggregate.  Aggregates vary from small installations such as the GPO Lab ProtoGENI aggregate that consists of eleven nodes to the PlanetLab and ProtoGENI aggregates that consist of hundreds of nodes.
     228  * ''The degree of control you need over your experiment.''  Do you need to tightly control the resources (CPU, bandwidth, etc.) allocated to your experiment or will best-effort suffice.  If you need a tightly controlled environment you might want to consider the U. of Utah ProtoGENI aggregate that allocate entire PCs that can be connected in arbitrary topologies.
     229  * ''The desired network topology.''  Does your experiment have to be geographically distributed?  What kinds of connectivity do you need between these geographically distributed locations.  Almost all aggregates can connect using IP connectivity over the Internet.   Many aggregates connect to one of the GENI backbones and allow you to set up IP connections with other resources on the backbone.  This will give you a bit more control over the network.   Some aggregates provide Layer 2 connectivity over a GENI backbone i.e. you can set up vlans between these aggregates and other resources on the backbone network.  This allows you to run non-IP protocols across between the aggregate and other resources.
     230  * ''The desired control over network flows.''  If you need to manage network traffic to/from an aggregate you might want to use aggregates that connect to a GENI backbone using OpenFlow switches or set up vlans to these aggregates through the ProtoGENI Backbone Nodes or the SPP Nodes.
     231  * ''The number of resources you need from an aggregate.''  Aggregates vary from small installations such as the GPO Lab ProtoGENI aggregate that consists of eleven nodes to the PlanetLab and ProtoGENI aggregates that consist of hundreds of nodes.
     232
     233The GENI Project Office is happy to help find the best match of resources for your experiments.  Please contact [mailto:help@geni.net Mark Berman] for assistance.
    230234[[BR]]
    231235
     
    243247
    244248== 5.0 Getting Access to GENI ==
    245 To use GENI for experimentation please contact [mailto:mberman@bbn.com Mark Berman].
     249To use GENI for experimentation please contact [mailto:help@geni.net Mark Berman].
    246250[[BR]]
    247251[[BR]]